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I have recently been wondering how many of you frame your basements in. I have done it two different ways. Either building the walls normally on the ground or stick framing it in.

I used to hate stick framing it. I was completely against it I thought it took longer, and was more work. Recently I have been getting a lot of basement framing/frostwall jobs. So I've tried thinking of ways to make them go faster.

I have gone strictly to stick framing. Basically all i do is i cut all my plates, lay them out, take my measurement to the bottom of the joist and minus 1/2", cut my studs, nail bottom plate, put in 2 end studs, place in top plate, level, fill it in.

On a 8' ceiling I can get away with never going on a ladder. 9' takes a bit longer but I find its easier lifting and you're not having to figure out how you're going to get this wall behind the furnis. I can do about 100 ln ft in 4-5 hours that's from the time I pull up to the time I leave.

I'm always looking for ideas to make it go faster (that way I can make some more $) any suggestions would be helpful
 

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In a basement, I like to set up a vertical line laser and set the top and bottom plates to this. The line continues through and around obstructions and the plates are perfectly straight and plumb. A helper can stud up the wall after with little risk of error

It's often hard to find space to lay down a wall in a basement, and nothing more frustrating than overlooking the hump in the floor that makes it too tight to stand up.

Stick framing seems the only logical way between irregular fixed points like an existing basement
 

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I almost always frame the walls on the ground and stand up monolithically. There is never a bunch of stuff in the way because they are always empty before we start.

If there are bulkheads and such Ill panel to it, and install a panel on layout under it.

The larger condsideration for basement framing is becoming fire blocking. Make sure you install your fire blocking before you build the wall no matter what technique you employ.

http://www.ohiohomedoctorremodeling.com/basement-finishing-cincinnati-ohio
 

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I use the C-channel for steel studs for the top and bottom plates set on a laser line as Larry describes. The advantage to the C-channel is the flange allows you to cut all the studs a little short and still secure them well. This is true for wood or steel studs you place. Steel studs get screwed in with mini's, wood studs get a 2-3/8" gun nail through the channel into the edge of the stud.

Don't forget all the fire blocking at the soffits and between the back of the stud wall, face of foundation wall.

Tom
 

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I almost always frame the walls on the ground and stand up monolithically. There is never a bunch of stuff in the way because they are always empty before we start.

If there are bulkheads and such Ill panel to it, and install a panel on layout under it.

The larger condsideration for basement framing is becoming fire blocking. Make sure you install your fire blocking before you build the wall no matter what technique you employ.

http://www.ohiohomedoctorremodeling.com/basement-finishing-cincinnati-ohio
Same here. I snap a line for my top plate and run strips of 3/4" plywood to the front of that line for fire stop. You could also use 5/8 drywall. Then I take measurements all the way across and cut my studs go fit the smallest measurement. Stand wall and shim where necessary.
 

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In a basement, I like to set up a vertical line laser and set the top and bottom plates to this. The line continues through and around obstructions and the plates are perfectly straight and plumb. A helper can stud up the wall after with little risk of error

It's often hard to find space to lay down a wall in a basement, and nothing more frustrating than overlooking the hump in the floor that makes it too tight to stand up.

Stick framing seems the only logical way between irregular fixed points like an existing basement
You're not the famouse larry the basement guy from YouTube are you?
 

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We have done a couple recently where the basement walls were pretty decent as far as plumb and flat. In this case we reduce the space between the plates and the concrete wall to the point where the top plate squishes the existing foundation insulation creating inherent and free fire blocking. The inspectors liked this.

Last noted on fire blocking, don't forget the verticle fire blocking. Here its every 10'. We have been using 1.5" treated lumber for this.
 

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Steel studs are great for the builder; light, fast, straight, but that's about it. For the homeowner they suck. Hanging pictures, shelves, etc stink on steel.

Also from the ones we have demo, I have noticed that steel will rust away to nothing long before wood decays in the event of a bad sump pump.
 

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Steel studs are great for the builder; light, fast, straight, but that's about it. For the homeowner they suck. Hanging pictures, shelves, etc stink on steel.

Also from the ones we have demo, I have noticed that steel will rust away to nothing long before wood decays in the event of a bad sump pump.
It doesn't take a world of genius to fasten to a steel wall.

The only real disadvantage is the cost.
 

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You don't really want to average, you want to cut to the shortest height. Especially if you have tile floors overhead.
Thats a very good point,
I also thought about using a steel stud track at the top and bottom, cutting studs to fit loose and nail em in, same concept as steel framing, non bearing applications only though ;)
 

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Thats a very good point,
I also thought about using a steel stud track at the top and bottom, cutting studs to fit loose and nail em in, same concept as steel framing, non bearing applications only though ;)
Steel track and wood studs?
 

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I use the C-channel for steel studs for the top and bottom plates set on a laser line as Larry describes. The advantage to the C-channel is the flange allows you to cut all the studs a little short and still secure them well. This is true for wood or steel studs you place. Steel studs get screwed in with mini's, wood studs get a 2-3/8" gun nail through the channel into the edge of the stud.

Don't forget all the fire blocking at the soffits and between the back of the stud wall, face of foundation wall.

Tom
Thats a very good point,
I also thought about using a steel stud track at the top and bottom, cutting studs to fit loose and nail em in, same concept as steel framing, non bearing applications only though ;)
Steel track and wood studs?
I have thought about it but never done it. I see no practicle issue other than loss of strength.

Most basements here are with 3/4" so we can usually bump cut the studs in unison.
I've thought about that too
In post #5 I stated that is how I assemble the walls. Very forgiving, leaving the top 1/4 to 1/2" short keeps the wall from transferring to the floor joists. I looked at one home where the tile floor in the kitchen had a crack across its entire width. It lined right up with on of the dividing walls in the basement.

I saw a drawing for basement framing in Colorado, they hung the wall off the floor joists and allowed the bottom to float on pins due to the expansive soils.

Tom
 
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