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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Don't know if i'm in the right forum but i'll give it a shot. I'm looking to waterproof my basement the correct way as i'm going to dig all the way down to the footer and membrane the entire wall all the way around the perimeter including footer drains and such. Can anyone recommend a system and where i could get some prices on the material? Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok, yea i've found some products from Tremco as well. For this carlise system, what are you using for a footer drain? How about drain tile?
 

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Ok, yea i've found some products from Tremco as well. For this carlise system, what are you using for a footer drain? How about drain tile?
we use 4" pvc perforated by hand set in rock and with separator fabric...BESIDE THE FOOTING not on top
 

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Drain tile makes any surface coating system much better, especially if you dig as few inches deeper (to the bottom or slightly below the footings) to get the water away from the walls. For new construction, it is a no-brainer and cheap, but since you apparently have an existing home with the excavation done, it is not too costly and far more reliable since it can also reduce the upward hydrostatic pressure inside the basement and under the slab. Nothing is more costly than trying chase a leak around a basement, when you can remove the water.
 

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Ok, yea i've found some products from Tremco as well. For this carlise system, what are you using for a footer drain? How about drain tile?
we use 4" pvc perforated by hand set in rock and with separator fabric...BESIDE THE FOOTING not on top


eeks double post....how do i delete?
 

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Drain tile makes any surface coating system much better, especially is you dig as few inches deeper (to the bottom or slightly below the footings) to get the water away from the walls. For new construction, it is a no-brainer and cheap, but since you apparently have an existing home with the excavation done, it is not too costly and far more reliable since it can also reduce the upward hydrostatic pressure inside the basement and under the slab. Nothing is more costly than trying chase a leak around a basement, when you can remove the water.
as usual "well said" advice
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Great advise. I intend to def use a membrane and drain tile system. I have only one problem, if its a problem at all and that is that i cannot daylight my drain tile anywhere. I was thinking of constructing two dry well systems, on in the front yard and also on in the back yard in which the drain tile will run and collect to as well as the roof drain leaders. Anyone do this? I mean i wouldnt really want to dump the water into the sump inside the basement as i would want this water to go to the dry well as well. Whats the usual cost for the drain tile and membrane materials?? On average. If you choose not to say thats fine as i will eventually get a dealer and price out anyway.
 

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I've seen household roof drains ran linked into one dry well under a patio, obv. use an excavator. If you can't daylight, dry wells are the right idea. I was gonna mention drainage, I think drainage is awesome. When I landscaped years ago, we put drainage around my bosses lake house. The water was still stagnant when we started the trench. We dug through water. Until it day lighted back into the lake. After seeing that work. Besides an installation to the foundation, I definitely vouch for PVC. Obviously mud in the stones is gonna halt everything.
 

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Keep the downspout drainage separate from the drain tile. All you do is flood your foundation and under slab during a heavy rain.

Depending on your climate, a buried solid pvc (not corrugated!) can be used to carry the water away fom the house and you can always use a pop-up once it is far enough away.
 

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Keep the downspout drainage separate from the drain tile. All you do is flood your foundation and under slab during a heavy rain.

Depending on your climate, a buried solid pvc (not corrugated!) can be used to carry the water away fom the house and you can always use a pop-up once it is far enough away.
This is absolutely right. Also if you get a clog of leaves or debris in a drain tile below the surface how fun is it going to be to clean that out? I say nightmare.:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Actually i was going to run a seperate line for the roof leaders to the dry well. So the drain tile would be seperate. I have to dig some test pits to verify my water table first before i can even think of doing this. I believe i am high enough in my area where i will be ok but you never know.
 

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We have used Carlisle and Tremco, and have found better service and tech support from Carlisle if and when there is a problem, for what it's worth.
 

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First Post - I hope it helps
For membrane, drainage board and strip drain, I would recommend dry dog barriers dot com. Talk to Lindsey about the "Greyhound" an elastomeric membrane.
If you can't get to daylight, we use the Saber Sump Pit with 12'' extension rings to grade(exterior always). Install minimum 1 primary pump, 1 back up pump that is both AC and DC powered in case primary is overwhelmed or power outage. I personally wouldn't rely on a dry well alone, (really not at all) they have to be below the slab elevation, if and when it rains for several days and the ground is saturated, dry well can't perk anymore, then, Presto! wet basement from hydrostatic pressure that has built beneath the slab. Yes, your walls will be dry because you sealed them, but your no longer moving the water away. Pumps will keep water moving when you can't get to daylight.
The insulating drainage board will prevent pressure from building against your walls by draining several hundred GPH per foot into the strip drain. Again, it keeps the water moving towards the sump. Of course you'll have the 4" inch pvc placed below the top of the footing and pitched towards the pit.
 

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Nice post MB1! Welcome to the forum.

He is exactly right about the dry well. It will be full of water when you really need it. I think you have to either get to daylight, a storm system or pump it out on top far enough away to relieve pressure from the foundation.

I have a sump at an outside corner of my basement that I can drop a pump into anytime I want. A below the top of footer tile that is bedded into stone drains into this sump. In the last 3 years, we have had 3 100 year floods and I have stayed dry every time.

I drain an inside the footer tile into an interior sump with AC and DC backup. Obviously you have to do this before the floor is poured. These pumps evacuate to a seperate tile that drains to an agriculture tile and that drops to a drainage ditch about a 1/4 mile away from the house.

I actually hooked the DC backup to pump to the surface about 100 feet from the house just in case the field floods so bad that I can't get gravity to take the pressure off the house. It may sound like overkill, but we use the basement as living space, raising 3 boys down there.

In the 100 year floods we have had the neighboring field was almost completly under water. While my house sits up at the high end, the bottom of the footer is only two foot above the nomal ditch level. During those floods, I was very conscious monitoring my pumps and had my backup generator ready to go.
 

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Nice post MB1! Welcome to the forum.
Good point....one of the more informative AND correct first posts I have seen on here..... Sure beats the normal can you help me price X inagural post.
 
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