Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Wondering what suggestions the pros might have for basement ceilings. I would like to avoid a true drop ceiling because of the loss in headroom, but I don't necessarily want to just put up drywall because of the sound transmission - the basement will be rented out, so the more isolated, acoustically, I can make the upstairs and downstairs, the better. Of course, drywall also doesn't give me any real access to the plumbing/wiring.

I saw an idea somewhere - a manufacturer's website, actually, can't remember which one though - about gluing acoustical panels directly to the joists. I've never heard of that being done, would that work? I also looked into various other options, like "QuietRock" which you install like drywall but has a very high STC rating, but that's about $120 per 4x8 ! I guess I could still do resilient channels, but they seem to be prone to short-circuiting, and I have yet to find them in stock anywhere. Finally, I see Owens-Corning has a product called Solserene that sounds perfect, but I bet it's $$$ too. O-C says Lowes and others sell it through the pro desk, but the guys at the local store had never heard of it.

Basically, I'm looking to minimize sound transmission and maximize head room without spending a fortune. Access would be a nice side benefit, but I would be willing to give that up first.

Thanks!
 

·
DGR,IABD
Joined
·
9,683 Posts
You can install a regular drywall ceiling on the metal "Z" channel lath. This acts like a spring, effectively isolating the drywall ceiling from the wood joists and negating sound transmission. Cheap and effective. It's being done a lot in my area for home theater installs. I think that the Z channel lath might have a trade slang name, but I forget what it is. We just call it Z channel. I sort of hate to see "permanent" ceilings going into basements. If you need to correct and/or change anything in the future with your mechanicals, you're sort of screwed. Whatever suits you. Why couldn't you just use the regular Armstrong 12x12 staple up tiles like the 40 million other 1960's and 70's basement remodelers did? They do a pretty good job at reducing sound. One thing I can guarantee you is that no option is totally "sound proof". Nothing short of a concrete span deck (maybe not even that) will completely null the sound.
 

·
DGR,IABD
Joined
·
9,683 Posts
Here's a picture and a link to one manufacturer's product. I just pulled this off the net just now. Any brand looks basically like this one. IF you accidentally screw completely through the lath and get lucky enough to hit the floor joist too, you'll "short circuit" the channel's effectiveness as the original poster pointed out. You have to be sure to let the electrician know when you're using these, since it adds an additional 1/2" to the finished wall thickness. He'll have to leave the device boxes stick out a little extra. I just did a job in a new doctor's office a couple of weeks ago where they used these on all the exam room walls. It's sold whereever sheetrock guys buy all their super cool sheetrock stuff. It's generally supplied by and installed by the rockers.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Big,
I used a product about 3 years ago, a zero clearance drop ceiling.it uses a plastic track fastened directly to the floor joist,there was a length of "t" that snapped into the fixed track that held the 2x2 or 2x4 tiles and cross members in place. very servicable and affordable, Ill see if I can dig up the link for you.
" stay curious"
Dan
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,078 Posts
I guess I am not getting it. What part of this is attached the joist and what part is the drywall attached to? The idea is the drywall is not attached or connected to the actual joists on the ceiling in any way right? So the channel is screwed to the joists and the drywall is screwed to the channel only? It seems like this stuff would sag or create and uneven ceiling?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Resilient channel and Z-channel are one in the same, as far as I'm aware. Here's another link with more info and pics: http://truesoundcontrol.com/products/RC824.html

I have the same concerns about an uneven ceiling with that stuff. I have also heard about some failures of the channels, where I guess the screws just rip out of the metal and the drywall comes crashing down. :eek:

edit - Wow, those ads on the top really work! Here's one of those zero-clearance drop ceilings: www.ceilinglink.com I think that might be the way to go. If the price is reasonable, I might attach a sound-blocking barrier sheet to the joists first, and then the drop ceiling to that.
 

·
DGR,IABD
Joined
·
9,683 Posts
Big E said:
I have the same concerns about an uneven ceiling with that stuff. I have also heard about some failures of the channels, where I guess the screws just rip out of the metal and the drywall comes crashing down. :eek:
I certainly don't have any interest in "selling" this product to anyone, but I think that the sag and crashing down fears are unfounded. My background is mostly in commercial work, and I've observed these in use for the best part of 20 years in that setting. I have not personally observed any abnormalities or failures of this type of product. As with any product, improper installation will result in undesirable results.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,539 Posts
mdshunk is correct

I have seen them use that on this old house many times. Especially when there do a home theatre room in a remodel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Update - Used the ceiling link stuff, works great. Very easy to install, looks as good as a drop ceiling can look, and frees up lots of head room. I noticed they carried some similar stuff in Lowes, but it didn't look to be as slick of a system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,471 Posts
I also do acoustical work (home theaters and yachts). Much is based on stopping low freqs., the highs are fairly easy. Anyone wanting more info can post.
Did you know that Blue Whales can communicate across the Pacific Ocean using ultra low frequency sound? Elephants can do about 6 miles through the air. Given the fluid ratio of about 600:1, elephants have the Blues beat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Big E

Saw that you used the CeilingLink product. Any specifics of what you liked about the product? Ease of installation? How the tiles went in? Etc.

Thanks!

Bryan Klakamp
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
[Did you know that Blue Whales can communicate across the Pacific Ocean using ultra low frequency sound? Elephants can do about 6 miles through the air. Given the fluid ratio of about 600:1, elephants have the Blues beat.[/QUOTE]


TEETORBILT,

You are a wealth of knowledge :clap: I like that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
I'm a bit late on this post, but the metal channel is called RC-1 it's more forgiving than z-channel,,we use zchannel in industrial black wall applications so we can insulate w/ foam sheets

we have aslo used a drywall suspension system in basements..for those that haven't seen it it's like a heavy duty acustical grid that you screw drywall to-Kevin
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top