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Hello - New to this site -

As a painter, I have done couple of trim work. Currently, I have a client that wants me to re-trim his 2 bedroom condo. They want 1x4 used as the baseboard and 1x2 for casing.

The issue: both of them are 5/8 thickness. I recommended that we find a 1x4 with 1/2 width, which would be the correct way. However they are insisting that I use the same width for a smooth transition.

A. Does anyone have a recommendation/tips for this kind of installation? I see the use of wood clay and sanding if the width is going to be the same.

Thanks....
 

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Do you want a smooth transition, or do they? i've worked with casing and baseboard that are the same thickness lots of times. we just butt it up to the casing, even if it's all flat profile.

But if you really want them to tie in together, i would just glue where they meet, then fill and do lots of sanding until there's no noticeable transition
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Do you want a smooth transition, or do they? i've worked with casing and baseboard that are the same thickness lots of times. we just butt it up to the casing, even if it's all flat profile.

But if you really want them to tie in together, i would just glue where they meet, then fill and do lots of sanding until there's no noticeable transition
Thanks! They want the smooth transition. The carpenter I used to work for all ways told me to make sure the base is a little thinner the casing so the casing has a little lip and that was the right way of doing it.

This is the first square trim that I have ever done, so I'm thinking of butting it against the casting, fill the little crack with clay, sand it and paint it.
 

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that's about all you can do. I have done it where I sanded a slight roundover profile on the end of the baseboard, but then there is a visible crack where the two meet which is obviously not what you want.
 

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The casing will already have a round over. you need to at least put a round over at the end of the base.
You will struggle and fail, and it won't be your fault. it just is. Flush is impossible 100% of the time.
There is a 1/2 x4 base just for that.
Best bet is to show the clients how it will look
 

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Seen it, done it. It looks a little weird but it's their house and if that's what they want fine. They're cutting the check and I don't have to live with it.

To get a smooth finish I like to use Evercoat automotive Spot-Lite spot putty. Like bondo but smoother and easy to sand.
 

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The carpenter I used to work for all ways told me to make sure the base is a little thinner the casing so the casing has a little lip and that was the right way of doing it.
In his opinion. it's really up to the customer and some people want 5/8 casing and 5/8 baseboard and aren't too concerned about how they butt up
 

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I've run into that...... and to keep the base trim/ casing exactly flush, I drop a formica sample shim behind the butt joint. For invisable though, you still have to fill/sand.
 

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Hello - New to this site -

As a painter, I have done couple of trim work. Currently, I have a client that wants me to re-trim his 2 bedroom condo. They want 1x4 used as the baseboard and 1x2 for casing.

The issue: both of them are 5/8 thickness. I recommended that we find a 1x4 with 1/2 width, which would be the correct way. However they are insisting that I use the same width for a smooth transition.

A. Does anyone have a recommendation/tips for this kind of installation? I see the use of wood clay and sanding if the width is going to be the same.

Thanks....
In most cases it is nice to put a base block, it will make a nice transition and you don't have to worry about being to deep or not being flush. It will eliminate extra labor like you said, caulking and filling, sanding,etc if they don't match up perfectly, not to mention it will look like s^*t if they don't, even with sanding and filling.
Try explain this to the HO and make a sense out of it, they might change theirs mind, was in a few similar situations and they were happy with the outcome.
 

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1 by 2 casing?

Filling joints with clay?

Is it just me???
LOL
Exactly. Even if the doors/jams are perfectly centered in the opening, 2" (really just 1-1/2" wide) casing probably won't span the gap. The joint between the casing and the base is probably going to be the least of your problems.
 

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Exactly. Even if the doors/jams are perfectly centered in the opening, 2" (really just 1-1/2" wide) casing probably won't span the gap.
Maybe some of the R.O.s for the doors you set are large, but mine are typically only 2" larger. 2'8" for a 2'6" door. It leave around a 1/4" shim space. 1 1/2" casing would cover just fine.

Here is the job I was referring to...



We came back about a year later to replace those corner guards, replace all the painted door in the hall with clear finish maple as well as new base/shoe/casing down the hall.
 

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Joseph A. Capece
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99.99% of the trim I install is the same thickness as the casings. Usually 1x6 base and 1x4 casings. Is that not common in the rest of the country?
 

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CENTERLINE MV said:
99.99% of the trim I install is the same thickness as the casings. Usually 1x6 base and 1x4 casings. Is that not common in the rest of the country?
It's not that common around here (Boston)
Where are you?

I'd say 90 percent here is moulded casing.

Yes it can be done right. Yours looks good.
 
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