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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently did a kitchen remodel , when I do back splash I usually like to install the window casing over the trim rather than cut the tile to the trim. I think it gives it a nice clean look instead of looking directly at a bead of caulk no matter how small and perfect it may be.

Anyways, the home owner is quite irrate that I did it this way, even went so far as to get a quote from another contractor to cut the tile back and reinstall the trim. This particular contractor agreed with her that install the trim ontop of the tile is wrong. I'm assuming he did that because he wants to get paid to fix it..

Anyways, it's an easy (if annoying fix) so I'm just wondering what the general feeling is.. is casing on top of tile wrong? FYI it's very thin subway style tile.
 

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How did you deal with the jamb being too short? How did you deal with the casing where the the backsplash stops?

I generally butt to the casing and use sanded, color matched caulk.
 

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slowsol said:
How did you deal with the jamb being too short? How did you deal with the casing where the the backsplash stops? I generally butt to the casing and use sanded, color matched caulk.
What he said. Did you just caulk the 1/4" gap where the casing and jamb meet? That would look worse than a nice grout calk joint.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Shimed the casing so it was nice and flat, tile was super thin so a nice thin bead of latex caulk and some paint sealed the gap up nicely. Glued the trim on where it over lapped the tile. Thicker tile I would have ripped down a piece of wood and extended the jam., creating sort of a step with a double reveal. Usually cabinets on either side of the windows (as was here) so the outside edge of the trim isn't typically visible anyways.

Actually only was problematic when she attempted to hang drapes on the trim and the screws torqued the trim into the 'void' behind revealing my 'mistake' . I explained that MDF casing isn't really designed to hold drapes and they should be mounted above the trim and screwed right into the header, but perhaps I do that wrong too lol
 

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The HO and other contractor are correct, I don't even know how you can do that properly without looking worse. If you do that then pull the cabinets and countertops and install the tile behind those.

That's just not normal practice for a backsplash tile installation.
 

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hack of all trades
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What you did is definitely not common practice but I have nothing against different approaches. In this case, the functionality of the install isnt compromised, so I dont see what the problem is unless it looks like sh*t. The one problem I see with this is, depending on how far under the trim the tile runs, nailing the trim gets weird.
 

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But it does have me thinking... any reason not to just rabbet the trim out a little say, 3/4" where you could install it like normal as far as the jamb is concerned but could look nice having no grout caulk joint where the tile meets the casing.
 

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hack of all trades
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But it does have me thinking... any reason not to just rabbet the trim out a little say, 3/4" where you could install it like normal as far as the jamb is concerned but could look nice having no grout caulk joint where the tile meets the casing.
Rabbet is a much nicer way to approach this, i agree
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Forums are interesting. First time I've played with them actually :)
I googled the answer before coming on here to inquire and it's a pretty even debate actually lol
I guess it all would come down to how it looked, personally I hate trimmed back tile, you end up staring at a caulk line. No matter how perfectly you do it it's still right there in front of you.

Guess realistically would have to see it to know how it looked, or I'd have to describe it better.

But if you think about it, 1/4 rise on the outside of the trim (hidden by abutting cabinets) even with a negligible taper to the trim of 1/8 inch over the 3" width of the casing the caulking line would only be 1/8" thick, and be smooth and invisible once painted.

The problem was never the appearance however, it was the void behind it since it wouldn't hold drapes properly.
 

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If the caulk is grout colored it would not be noticeable.

The tile has to be at least 1/4" which means you caulked a 1/4" at the jamb. That seems worse to me.

Without pictures none of us know what would have looked best.
 

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Forums are interesting. First time I've played with them actually :)
I googled the answer before coming on here to inquire and it's a pretty even debate actually lol
I guess it all would come down to how it looked, personally I hate trimmed back tile, you end up staring at a caulk line. No matter how perfectly you do it it's still right there in front of you.

Guess realistically would have to see it to know how it looked, or I'd have to describe it better.

But if you think about it, 1/4 rise on the outside of the trim (hidden by abutting cabinets) even with a negligible taper to the trim of 1/8 inch over the 3" width of the casing the caulking line would only be 1/8" thick, and be smooth and invisible once painted.

The problem was never the appearance however, it was the void behind it since it wouldn't hold drapes properly.
The miters would look like crap doing it that way. I would say there would be a problem with appearance. Trim is supposed to be flat, not angled IMO in this instance. Plus, you have caulk at the counter top and the cabinet transition and the corner as well. You're suppose to have caulk at every plane change so this is just one more plane change that has caulk like everything else.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Actually i just finished renovating a 130 year old house, and trust me with a little sand paper, caulking, patience and a whole lot of swearing you can make damned near any random angle look good. Or at least anything thats going to be painted.. if it was a wood/stain kinda trim it would be hell on earth. Could probably still make it look good but i'd cry a little
 

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As mentioned you have caulk in other areas. So by doing it your way you have abnormal looking tile where it meets the casing and also abnormal looking casing on the window.

So now you have 2 areas that look abnormal I for one would notice it in a heartbeat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Actually I like trimmed windows better, makes em 'pop'

But that does look nice yes, but that would involve riping out the sill, drywalling etc. There are of course 1000's of better ways to do things, but that wasn't within the scope of the job.
 

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jferrie:

Lots of folks have different ways of doing things and disagree on same. I like your method and agree with your reasoning, but I'm not signing your check on this one. Do what you've got to do to make her happy and move on.
 

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Seems like a lot more work. And no way could it look as good as the normal way with a super thin grout line. Seems silly to me to want to do it that way
 
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