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Artisan Carpentry
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This thread will be a series of photos of interesting architecture in my neck of the woods. Winona has a rich history as an upper Mississippi River town. Steamboats, lumber and flour mills, railroads were a big part of the early days.

The first home is that of a lumber baron. It is known as the Huff Lamberton House and is for sale for about one million, last I heard.

Cheers,

Basswood
 

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1 mil. seems like a bargain, can you imagine the labor it took to build that?
Even with todays tools it would be quite a project.
 

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Those old (1860-1900) Mississippi River towns (Red Wing to LaCrosse) had more millionaires that you could shake a stick at because of the lumber business. The grand old homes were very common, but many were bought for the trim and millwork that was used in some of the "new" money (in Minneapolis/St. Paul) for the grain and railroad money that wanted elegant mansions. Even in those days, they did not want "new" growth wood.

I had an architecturally significant home in St. Paul that was built in 1917. - Flat roof (double with 2-3' spacing, interior roof drains, 9-10' ceilings and solid "newer growth birch" trim that was custom cut (each piece identified and dated) and was painted and never stained. All hollow clay tile exterior walls (stuccoed) with full 2x4s inside, lath and plaster plus a 1/8" "china coat" finish. An amazing house, but there are many similar homes all along the Mississippi River. - mine even had a built in wall safe in the basement with a 3" thick door.

On of my "shirt tail" relatives had a husband that built a state of the art home for her near LaCrosse, WI that had double cavity walls of brick inspired by a trip to the 1880? Worlds Fair. It was also a sort of a mansion in its day with great trim. I think it is now gone. Getting unique home built in the early days was very possible because of the quality required of the trades. At that time a mansion could have been built for $3500 -$5000.
 

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When you see this kind or craftsmanship you wonder what it was like to be part of the crew working on these masterpieces.

No boom boxes
No Sliding compound miterboxes
No Alumapole pumpjacks
No CAD drawings

Just masters ....like yourself, Bass.:thumbsup:
 

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Wood Craftsman
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When I work on .....

this type of architecture... I really like to listen to opera.....that is no joke.....but honeslty..it is capturing the feeling of the time and period for me... and it is great.. an acquired taste;)....:thumbsup: and then later NIN:laughing::thumbsup:
Brian
 

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Hey Pres
Buffalo has a lot of great architecture in it also. I think I remember a post showing great pics of beautiful turn of the century homes in the Buffalo area.
Prb'ly from you Pres:thumbsup:

You don't have to apologize for listening to Opera.
I love getting into the Classics when I'm working on a special project.
 

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Wood Craftsman
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It's not only the homes...

the buildings in the city are incredible in their architecture & Design. The architecture of most of the buildings being constructed today can not hold a candle to that time period..

I have a friend in the business that is working on the Frank Loyd Write Martin house downtown..4-million is the price tag for the renovation~:eek:.


He was contemporary but had a style he put into his projects that was indulged in wood. The ceiling in the home is layer after layer of trim work. I had dinner with his trim guy last month and is laid off do to the lack of funds to continue. Tim told me when they were starting the refurbish project inside it was un godly how much wood was in the ceiling design... layer after layer just to replace or repair areas of the ceiling.....

I do like his choice of stained glass design.. but his style was contemporary and everything is sharp corners- not my style but very interesting....
 

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copper magnet
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When you see this kind or craftsmanship you wonder what it was like to be part of the crew working on these masterpieces.

No boom boxes
No Sliding compound miterboxes
No Alumapole pumpjacks
No CAD drawings

Just masters ....like yourself, Bass.:thumbsup:
But Brian is the inventor (as far as I know) of the internal Ipod driven Makita boom box. One more thing he's the master of.:whistling
 

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Wood Craftsman
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7,324 Posts
don't thank me....

Thank Bass!:thumbsup:

I am just thankful that There are those of you guys that appreciate this as well.....it is so intricate in detail and speaks volumes of the craftsman of yesterday...:thumbup:

I drive by all these newer 1/2mil homes & up on estimates in Amherst... Clearence..and they can not even come close to replicating anything such as what Bass has put up...seriously... detail in the window trim..the eves with leaf cornice corbels... they are actually "orders" ...in the architectural sense.. Think about ... boxed open frieze with hand carved Greek goddess ,,ahhh possibley eygptian~and leaf accent....... all the tedious work and attention to detail... it is absolutely incredable... i MEAN LOOK AT IT... what a great piece of architecture...:thumbsup: what craftsman...:thumbup:


You want a chalange.....dive in..just be patient with yourself..there are so few of us around...trust me.. once you do something like this... you will never leave the vortex....:thumbsup: the possibilities seem endless IMO... :eek:

Be patient.. more to come.. :thumbsup:Brian
 
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