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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I hear some Apprenticeships are a lot better than others. Can anyone suggest a good school and a particular field that pays well and is enjoyable? Any info appreciated.

Scott
 

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You leave out some info such as how old you are, where you are located and what you envision for the rest of your life. Are you more comfortable as an employee or looking forward to starting your own business in the future.
According to the one of the latest editions of The Builders News, plumbers will be in the greatest demand in the future and I would look at this hard. Plumbing ranges from residential (mostly light work and often climate controlled) to skyscrapers and large fire control systems involving heavy equipment and pretty big pipe.
Plumbers are making a pretty good buck right now and that will increase with demand. The other nice thing is you can always go out on your own. Electrics don't have a lot of moving parts to break and people can live without framing carpenters if the industry slows down. Toilets will always run and get stopped up, faucets will always leak and water heaters will continue to go bad. A steady income is a given.
Were I you, I would locate the local builders assocn. and find out what they have to offer. Ours is tied in with the local community college, other areas are tied in with trade schools. They offer night classes if you need to have a day job and can introduce you into the builder community. Course attendees are usually hired during the classes and leave with real jobs waiting. If you are working the drivethrough window for $6.00 an hour, many contractors will pay nearly twice that as an apprentice and allow you to leave early to attend classes. Expect another big jump when you graduate.
If you someday plan on opening your own business, start working towards your BA. It's not required but will surely make everything easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Teetorbilt,

Im sorry, let me give you more to go on. Im living in the Dallas area. I'm interested in a electrician apprenticeship. I do live by a 2 year degree college, im trying to find out if it would be beneficial to have a certain 2 year degree or just to find a good apprenticeship such as NJATC which has a location in Dallas. I see that they offer 4 types of programs, Inside, Outside, Residential, VDV installer. I prefer to work inside, but im not sure if one is easier than another or pays better. I hear that experience for journeymen is very good. I assume that all of these lead to becoming a journeyman. Im 27 years old, I havent really broken into an industry yet, and I just want to get into a rewarding career. I am employee minded, and dont really intend on starting a business.
I read what you posted about framing carpenters, I guess the demand for plumbers and electricians is pretty high and is growing?(Ive read)
Being a plumber might not be my first choice, but it looks very solid. I have a phobia about toilets though, not sure if most of the work is around that.
Thanks,
Scott
 

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Handy, Sounds like you are in the perfect position to chart out your course in life, old enough to make wise choices and young enough to fullfill them.
I'm a big believer in formal education, if nothing else, it shows commitment and followthrough. It also makes most people more intelligent and worldly which is reflected in their ability to make proper decisions.
My suggestion is to locate your local builders association and they will guide you to people who are in the trades that you are interested in. Meet these people, attend a few get togethers. Ours hosts golf, fishing tournaments, Funday Sunday and networking get-to-gethers at restaurants around town. Hardly a week goes by without something going on. Most of all, they are fun. Don't be surprised if you are courted by a few of them, you will be showing initiative and business owners look for that (management potential).
Sorry to hear about your phobia, toilets don't bother me a bit but I spent 7 yrs. as a civil engineer. Try looking into a 2 or 3 million gallon tank of cr, er, wastewater. I have a slight problem with electricity, had a few things on when they were supposed to be off, shocking!
This will get you started. http://www.dallasbuilders.com/
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi Teetorbilt, Thanks for that info. I also located a very interesting site, please let me know what you think or any concerns, it explains that you get paid on the job and all you have to pay is on the job training. Here is the link > iecdallas.com
All of these years in college, I'm thinking maybe I should have done something more direct, you know? What is so bad about learning a trade? haha..
 

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Handy, That site looks like an excellent place to get started. Don't knock the trades and don't knock your college years.
In an abstract way I never left the trades. I worked my way through some of the top universities (Perdue, A&M) in the trades. I was a commercial fisherman in the North Sea while earning my PHD's. Gotta go with the flow. They are all days that I will never forget. Eventually I pidgeon holed myself and none of the job offers were pleasing so I went out on my own in 1987, and back to the trades that had done so much for me. I love the challenge, love the people and the paycheck ain't bad either.
My daughter went to college willingly, my son had to be shoved. A sheepskin makes for a good 'plan B'.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I hear the seas can be quite dangerous out there. That takes a lot of courage im sure. Sounds like a really wild ride, :) That must have been a GREAT challenge studying at the same time. Im sure a lot fo the trade work is in contracting also. I see that a lot of other places hire for electricians though. I just hope that theres not too much work with the sun bearing down, hehe. Dont like to burn. I guess you can go anywhere with certain skills you know.. my cousin works in a Toyota manufacturing plant on the east coast, I hear the electrician people make huge money in those plants. Too bad we dont have a plant here, haha. Shux.
 

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Handy, I have a friend that designs custom interiors for business jets and last I heard he was in your neck of the woods. I'm sure that these things are wired too. Just pitchin' ideas.
You are right about the North Sea, no place for wimps especially during the winter. Seas can go to 35-50ft. overnight, we won't talk about the temps and the fact that you are generally wet. But the ice keeps you warm, you attack it with hammers, sledge hammers and picks, too much ice and you will turn turtle (flip over) so it's a 24/7 job. This is why I now live in So. FL, If I never see snow and ice again I will be a happy camper.
 
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