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Tile Contractor
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It's fun to use if you aren't in a hurry. The type of cuts are limited to the size of the tile you are making the cuts from. If all you are cutting is a light/gradual radius it's OK. They do bind easily and the blade stops. This will ruin the drivers in short order. It is more of a novelty saw for a hobbyist than anything else.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's fun to use if you aren't in a hurry. The type of cuts are limited to the size of the tile you are making the cuts from. If all you are cutting is a light/gradual radius it's OK. They do bind easily and the blade stops. This will ruin the drivers in short order. It is more of a novelty saw for a hobbyist than anything else.:)

I did wonder that. Only reason i looked at it was because my bro in laws wife wanted this crazy looking shower tile install that meant cutting loads of tiles in a wavy affect. She ain't having a shower now but the saw looked interesting. Not something i would need but a pretty cleaver concept.

This is the video that caught my eye.

 

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Tile Contractor
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1,249 Posts
I contracted with a flooring store that owned one of those things and I was intrigued by the concept. Never used it on a job but did borrow it for a weekend or two just to play with.

It was fun but I would never buy one for professional use. The ring-blade is driven by a series of rubberized rollers that are mounted in an arc. The top is the same way. You are limited in what you can do because the tile will run into the backside of the blade just when you don't want it to if the tile is too big. Some cuts are impossible to make because of this.

It's OK for little bitty tiles and semi-fine cuts but there again you are limited on how tight of a radius you can cut because the width of the blade also hangs on the tile and everything just stops.

If a guy has money to burn and wants to limit himself in his hobbying then I guess it's a fair saw to own.

Instead,
I bought a diamond band saw. Much better deal from a practical standpoint but probably more expensive. I have cut detailed oak leaves with my band saw that you would never be able to cut with the Revolution saw.:) I use it from time to time for weird stuff like that.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I contracted with a flooring store that owned one of those things and I was intrigued by the concept. Never used it on a job but did borrow it for a weekend or two just to play with.

It was fun but I would never buy one for professional use. The ring-blade is driven by a series of rubberized rollers that are mounted in an arc. The top is the same way. You are limited in what you can do because the tile will run into the backside of the blade just when you don't want it to if the tile is too big. Some cuts are impossible to make because of this.

It's OK for little bitty tiles and semi-fine cuts but there again you are limited on how tight of a radius you can cut because the width of the blade also hangs on the tile and everything just stops.

If a guy has money to burn and wants to limit himself in his hobbying then I guess it's a fair saw to own.

Instead,
I bought a diamond band saw. Much better deal from a practical standpoint but probably more expensive. I have cut detailed oak leaves with my band saw that you would never be able to cut with the Revolution saw.:) I use it from time to time for weird stuff like that.:)

Yeah i bet the back edge of the blade can give issues when doing larger tiles. Whats the diamond band saw your talking about Bud. Never heard of them.
 

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Tile Contractor
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1,249 Posts
http://www.diamondsaws.com/



That video makes that saw look impressive. That's easy to do standing at a trade show free-cutting different stones and tiles with no real purpose in mind for any of the cuts. Try making a mosaic with the ring saw and watch the waste pile up.
 

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Tile Contractor
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I don't use mine very often but when that once in a while unique customer comes along wanting a monogram or special whatever it is handy to be able to offer the service. Doesn't happen often unfortunately because folks around here are super conservative and think everything must be square and equal. It's hard to get them off of dead-center when it comes to creativity.:)
 

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Carpe Diem
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I went through this ordeal last year. I also looked into the ring saw and ended up with a wet band saw too. To me it was more practical. However, I didn't get such a large one like Bud. I got one that is more designed for glass cutting but it works fine for backsplashes, which is the reason I bought it. I haven't ventured outside of that need. Not sure if mine would cut 1/4" porcelain. For 5/16" or thinner, it works fine.
 
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