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Box Builder
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6,315 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have one question I am getting at basically. But let me set the scene. Framed this winter and covered roof with triflex. I used roofing tins held down with manual hammer tacker staples and roofing tins held down with 1/4" crown stapler. Seems the 1/4" crown staples when not driven to the proper depth (too deep) caused leaking. Not sure if the manual hammer tacker staples caused any leaking. I don't think so. Just getting around to roofing now and want to deal with leaks in triflex. Do you guys think it is ok to just cover the roof with 15# felt as I roof it?(main question) Or do you think I will have moisture problems with felt and triflex together?(i.e. roof won't be able to breathe enough beneath shingles. Roof is both cold and hot in spots. I am roofing with Certainteed 30 years Landmark Woodscapes asphalt. Perfect world I would cover the roof with double covereage 30# felt regardless of pitch and roof right away. Thanks, Wood.
 

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Jeff
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1,485 Posts
I guess i dont understand the problem. Im assuming this is a synthetic underlay? Im probably wrong but if its properly shingled what does it matter if the underlay could leak in a few spots, it shouldnt see the light of day again until the structure gets reroofed.
 

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Box Builder
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah yeah I know. But it is just a thing with me. I like to make sure that the underlayment is not leaking or pretty damn close. If by any chance the roof does leak than there is something else to back it up. Mainly worried about permeability with two different layers of underlayment.
 

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Tool Junkie
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137 Posts
When you shingle it you will ultimately be peppering the underlayment with holes anyway
 
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Jeff
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If you're worried about the sweating under the wet/torn/affected areas, just tear them open, let them dry and install the roof. Underlay just keeps it dry until the roof goes on. No other purpose that I can see, as far as waterproofing goes.

I had one roofer tell me all the underlay did was act as a slip barrier for the shingles when they expanded and contracted. His theory was if the rubbed on the plywood they would age prematurely. Kinda makes sense but it felt like one of those blowing smoke moments.
 

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Capra Aegagrus
Remodeler
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No one is telling me what I want to hear. So goes the internet.;)
I don't tell my wife what she wants to hear either, when she's out in left field. That's why we have a 7' couch.

Quit being anal about it and just shingle it. If you do that properly, the underlayment will be superfluous. :thumbsup:
 

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5 Posts
Yes,
Before your shingles are applied, it is easy to cut the Triflex with air driven roofing nails~ at angle, overdriven etc.. During heavy rains prior to the shingles being applied we have had some leaks if runoff runs over a hole cut by a nail.
All in all really like the product.
 

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Super Moderator
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10,597 Posts
Felt is prone to rips and leaks also. Most of the synthetics have horrible perm ratings, so adding the felt or even another layer of syn probably won't have an adverse affect. Definitely not needed though. If your shingles develop a leak bad enough that your relying on the paper, it should be fixed anyway.
 

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*note to self^* Crew should have been using tin tags, or cap nails and the triflex would not have been cut...= no leaks. :whistling

Triflex perm .54 or so and 30 lbs felt 5 perms or so.
 

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Box Builder
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Jesus. I'm not sure I even remember. I think, since it was my own home and it sat for so long in the weather; I ripped the triflex off where I had issues and relayed new.
 

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Been around
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Yes the thread seems a bit aged........

but really it could be asked and replied to in general situations, not just specific to the OP.

Underlayment serves as temporary weatherproofing. But there is also a function of protection from minor infiltrations from wind driven rain, ice dams and even as a layer to protect should some shingles blow off in a storm.

Anyway, the idea that an underlayment needs to be watertight like the finished roof is beyond the call or need of the product. Stopping the lesser quantity of waters that might get in under the above conditions would be its main function. Used as a temp covering that has minor leaks does not explicitly suggest failure.
 
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