Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Nail Driving Fool
Joined
·
556 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm needing a concrete saw for an upcoming job this summer. Have rented saws in the past but I've decided to just buy my own. Its going to be cheaper in the long run. Checked last years receipts and I paid out $600 in concrete saw rentals last year alone.

Local lumber yard is a full line Makita dealer and they have a DPC7311 in stock. This is a 73cc saw. Price is $1099.00 and that includes a diamond blade.

Pros, Cons, anything I need to know?

I have been renting Stihl TS400s and in my opinion they are pretty weak. I think they are in the 60cc range.
 

·
Nail Driving Fool
Joined
·
556 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Well it depends on my work load. Sometimes I have multiple jobs back to back that require a concrete saw, then I may go 6 months and not touch one. Some jobs I make 1 cut and others I run the saw all day.

I cut more sidewalks than anything. So most is around 3 1/2 inches.

Once in a blue moon I will cut a door or window opening in a brick or block wall.

The job I was referring too requires about 50 "pockets" in a slab so I can dig post holes for a fence around a pool.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
I would lean towards the Stihls. They have quite a few models with larger engines and the prices are about the same. As far as quality/dependability goes Stihl steals the show.
Heres a list of the models:http://www.leppos.com/parts/cutoffsaws/cutoffsawsale.html

If you ever plan on cutting concrete inside consider this option as well: http://www.diamondtool.net/p/saws-h...aw-14-electric-27hp-motor-15a-wet-cutting-kit

Also anytime you can cut wet take advantage of it. Concrete cuts a lot easier and the dust factor is cut down by 99% not to mention the water cools the blade and increases life span of the blade. If you have trouble with an under powered saw, step cut. What I mean is the first pass should be 1" deep, then the second pass down to 3" then the last pass down to 4" on a 4" slab.In all reality you should be doing this anytime you do a full depth cut. Also be careful to minimize under cutting into the grade below, it drastically shortens the life of a diamond blade and as I am sure you know those aren't cheap.
 

·
Want to play a game?
Joined
·
4,557 Posts
I wouldn't buy a 2-stroke ever again. I've seen the videos of the
Makita 4-stroke saw and why would anyone deal with the hassle of
2-stroke?
If a two stroke and four stroke were the same CC, the two stroke would have almost twice the power.

Two strokes are a tad cold blooded and they like to be wound out but the same power in half the size as an equivalent CC four stroke.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,295 Posts
I think the makita is made by dolmar (makita bought dolmar?)... I rented a dolmar years ago and it seemed fine.

I rented a lot, so I went ahead and got a Stihl ts400... It's plenty strong, and starts easily:thumbup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
195 Posts
I have one, as well as a Stihl. My next concrete or chainsaw i will look at Dolmar/Makita before Stihl. I think the Dolmar is a better product, but Stihl dealers are all over. None of the seam to stock anything except consumables though. Like said they're is small handfull of companies that make good one's
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
683 Posts
If a two stroke and four stroke were the same CC, the two stroke would have almost twice the power.

Two strokes are a tad cold blooded and they like to be wound out but the same power in half the size as an equivalent CC four stroke.
That's not the case with 4 stroke vs 2 stroke any more. Look at 4 stroke motorcycles or boat motors. I saw the Makita 4 stroke at world of concrete and it was a beast. Not to mention quieter, easier to start, no need for 2 stroke oil in each tank of gas, etc.


I don't think I'd want a four-stroke saw of any kind... 2 strokes take to sitting around for months or years much better, no oil to change, lighter, better power-weight.
2 strokes are the devil when it comes to maintenance. The need for 2 stroke oil to lube the motor is a huge issue. If the mix is not perfect every time then it wears on the pistons. I see tons of concrete saws in the shop every time I go in for service work.
 

·
Nail Driving Fool
Joined
·
556 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Picked this up off ebay. Got lucky seller was only 30 miles away and it turned out that I knew the guy. Not sure how he liked selling to his competition. He got a funny look on his face when I showed up to pick it up this morning. :laughing:

Stihl Ts400, going to need a new blade pretty soon but it runs like a raped ape! Guy said it might have 30 hours on it. I guess the Stihls I had been renting were worn out. What else is new? :rolleyes:

Paid $235.00 :thumbsup:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I'm needing a concrete saw for an upcoming job this summer. Have rented saws in the past but I've decided to just buy my own. Its going to be cheaper in the long run. Checked last years receipts and I paid out $600 in concrete saw rentals last year alone.

Local lumber yard is a full line Makita dealer and they have a DPC7311 in stock. This is a 73cc saw. Price is $1099.00 and that includes a diamond blade.

Pros, Cons, anything I need to know?

I have been renting Stihl TS400s and in my opinion they are pretty weak. I think they are in the 60cc range.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top