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Any of you guys thinking about going south to pick up some of Charlies aftermath. 250,000 homes is alot of work and Punta Gorda only has 54 contractors.

I'm in a slow market and thinking about it.

I've got three skilled carpenters and three helpers who are getting tired of half weeks and less.

Any input?

Bob
 

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Glass, Construction is booming. If you can swing a hammer, you've got work and that was before Charley. I have no idea where they are going to find the labor to put Punta Gorda back together.
If I were you, I'd hitch up the buggy and get down here, just don't forget to go back home. The sun, bikinis, golf and fishing make people want to stay forever. LOL
 
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You may disagree with the practice, but I'm betting the people who are waiting and waiting for help rebuilding will certainly disagree with you, and welcome the help and the lower prices that will actually result by increasing the number of contractors in the area. Simple supply and demand economics.
 

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They will certianly agree with me when they have a warranty claim and nobody is there to service the warranty... or when an unskilled laborer falls off a ladder and sues them because nobody has workmans comp.

The above posted is the norm for the storm chasers I have expeirence with. About a year after bad storms we end up correcting mistakes left behind by the storm chasers in my area. Many home owners have left me with stories about so called contractors leaving town for the next storm with thier deposit and nothing to show for it.

Also building practices and code vary from region to region so a roof to standards in my area wouldn't be to standards in Florida and visa versa. Even though I belive in quality I'd end up doing the job wrong because I'd be putting on a Chicago roof in Florida. Not a good idea.
 

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I agree with Grumpy. I thought that after hurricane Andrew Florida wasn't allowing outside contractors come in to work, that you needed to be licensed from the state of FL to get in on their work. But I might be wrong.

Here in StL about 4 yrs. ago we got hit with a massive hail storm. Probably wasn't a roof for miles around that didn't need replacing. We were suddenly flooded with aliens from south of the border doing roofing work. I told the GC working on mine I only wanted locals working. I'd rather support the local economy than some illegal's family in another country. I came home at lunch, and they were already done. My neighbor advised me there were at least 10 guys on my roof at once, and none were from north of the border. The results were cracks in my ceiling, all the ceiling fans were out of whack, etc. The roof had to be replaced a year later. And several roofing buddies of mine are still real busy cleaning up the shoddy work.

Not saying everyone who travels for work does bad work, but buyer beware if the labor used is temporary.
 

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It seems to me that Pro and Grump are bringing up some valid points.
I also like to support local guys, not to mention the fact that I might need them down the road.
What good would it be if they went back home 2000 miles away?
 
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I don't consider Glasshousebltr to be a storm chaser, but since you are so quick to lump everyone together as a storm chaser no matter if they are truly a scammer or just somebody looking for greener pastures...

Also, a simple visit to the building dept down there and 30 minutes consulting an inspector will mean you are now building a Florida roof in Florida. 95% of what you do is going to be indentical, the 5% difference anyone can change to comply with local codes.

Rebuilding is going to be going on for the next few years, this is not a hail storm that went through were within 3 months everything is back to normal. After the rebuilding there will be a period of growth in construction that has never been seen before in those hardest hit communities. There is going to be a ton of waterfront property that is not going to return to its original uses before the hurricane. Most of those trailer parks are never going to see another trailer on them, there will be a huge boom of expensive homes going up on this prime real estate and there is going to be a need for every type of construction worker.

You're totally naive to lump everybody together as a storm chaser. And especially naive to try to reduce this all to your experience with a bad storm that got you involved in fixing roofs.

There are families living in shelters. Once the insurance checks are cut they need skilled workers to spend that money on so they can return to a home. You need to stop lumping everybody as a scumbag that doesn't comply with your narrow views, there are many, many ways to skin the cat, as you get older and more experienced you will start to see that the older you get the less you really know.
 

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I didn't say HE was a storm chaser. I said that the rap of a storm chaser is not a good one. I also said I disagree in the whole idea of chasing a storm. Feel free to defend him but I don't think anyone was insulting HIM specifically.

Also your posts would mean alot more to us if you were registered, or at least signed them so we know who we are talking to.

I agree with all the evils of your post. It's a terrible storm. The terrible storm did terrible damage. What does that have to do with suckering someone already down on their luck? That is the reputation of a storm chaser.

A stero-type is a bad thing. We all know it to be true but I do not know one person who doesn't stero-type. I think it is human nature. Stero-types are based on facts and experiences though. If you have alot of dealings with one kind of people (people A) and you find that kind of people to usually be conscious of quality you may say "Boy those people A really pay attention to quality!" If you have dealings with one kind of people (people B) and those people are really cheap always asking for discounts you may say "Boy those people B are really some penny pinchers!" If you deal with one kind of person that commonly does poor work and scams customers and changes their number so you've nobody to call when a warranty issue comes up you may say "Boy those people are really dirty and underhanded." Not all People A may care about quality, not all people B may be cheap, not all people C may scam, but that's the stero-type for a reason! So to summarize this paragraph. I have had many experiences with storm chasers and NONE of them have been good ones. This is not based on ONE experience in ONE storm. This is based on several personal experiences and reading many many posts in many many forums by contractors and consumers. Also, apparently I am not the only person to think the way I do when it comes to storm chasers.

Let me ask all the storm chasers this question. How are you going to honor your warranty 2 years from now when you are in texas fixing a hail storm or Michigan fixing an ice storm or Oklahoma fixing a tornado? Even if you can conform to codes we are all human and sometimes make mistakes. If you are a storm chaser, giving your customer a warranty is blatent fraud. You know your going to be half way across the country within a year's time. "Mr COnsumer I'll fix your damage next time I am back in the neighborhood. How does the forecast look? Any storms headed your way?"
 

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Grumpy said:
How are you going to honor your warranty 2 years from now when you are in texas fixing a hail storm or Michigan fixing an ice storm or Oklahoma fixing a tornado?
It's true! How are they?
You would think that a customer should know that if they contract a guy, they should know where they reside, so you can make sure you have the best chance of service down the road because they can make small mistakes.

I do know that some people may still be willing to do business with a chaser, so they can get the work completed faster than if they held out for a local. But I think they should be upfront and say " I am not from this area, I do roofing work in ------ and I do good work, but realisticly speaking, I will not be able to come back into town for my warranty work once I leave"
They may not get as much business doing it this way, but that's why they call it ethics.
 
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ssorry Grumpy you can phophisize all you want about the definition of a storm chaser but that isn't what my response was about. I realize what a storm chaser is.

The thread asks if anyone is going south to Florida to get work. Your reply is and I quote "I prefer not to storm chase. I disagree with that whole practice."

You are sterotyping anyone who would move to Florida as a storm chaser, that would include Glasshousebltr.

Basically your opinion is that anyone who goes to Florida for whatever motivation or whatever work, no matter if they are going to get a job as an employee with a contractor or be a contractor, live there for the rest of their lives or just a monnth, do work honorably or not as a stormchaser. That's your response, not mine I didn't write it.
 

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Guys, I have lived here since 1967. I know what is going on.
We have had a lack of tradesmen for years. Many of the larger companies offer great incentives and training just to get people into their business. Community Colleges and builders associations offer courses in the trades. Currently all of the talent is tapped and then Charley comes along. All of the sudden we need a lot more people than we don't already have.
Power companies from as far away as MI are here. 60,000 Americans are homeless and will continue to be so for along time. They need as much help as they can get to put their lives back together. If you are a charlatain I'd just as soon shoot you in the back as the next guy but if your good and could use the work c'mon down, we could use the help. Stay a while, do some fishin', remember where home and family is. LOL
 

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I am not sterotyping anyone who MOVES. I am sterotyping anyone who temporarily relocated. Again your post doesn't mean much to me until you either register or start signing your posts. As it is I am talking to a shadow.

Teetor correct me if I am wrong but part of the reason FL has such tight codes and contractor requirements is partially due to storm chasers after Andrew hit.
 

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Grumpy said:
Teetor correct me if I am wrong but part of the reason FL has such tight codes and contractor requirements is partially due to storm chasers after Andrew hit.

I would be interested in finding out if this is true.
 

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Grumpy, The reason that we have such tight codes is because of what all of the developers and contractors did prior to Andrew. They started lobbying for more relaxed codes back in the 60's and little by little got what they wanted. The majority of them moved here from elsewhere and had no concept of the power of one of our little windstorms and the rest were just making a fast buck.
My dad was killed in 1973 and he predicted the storm damage way back then. BTW we didn't build to the old code either because dad was an engineer and could calculate wind loads. We built to our own code which was the equivilent to about 160 MPH when the code was based on 120 MPH. The aforementioned got it lowered to 110. Windspeed is expotential as you must know, so this allowed for a large drop in quality. That's why Kendall and Homestead looked like the Big Bad Wolf just got done with the house of sticks. That also led to the Miami-Dade Hurricane Code.
 
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