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Finally got time to have my new 93% furnace put in, took oout the A coil from my old unit since i will be getting a new one next spring (I had planned on next spring, but am told prices are going through the roof and even getting them at cost will be an additional $2-400 for the same sized unit so will be buying all new A/C stuff later this month-just cuz)

Anyways, I am also going to buy a humidifier. What is the "typical" percentage you guys set them at initally. I know house will factor into that but dont want it turning the house into a rain forest. Will the damper air help contribute to lower thermostat settings hence lower operating costs, or is it a wash? Either way kids and I are tired of bloody noses during winter months so it's getting installed.

What about wrapping the the heat runs and trunk lines with insulation...currently in unfinished basement. Or is this one of those inital cost things will never be repaid since it wont make that big of a difference?

Taped all my joints already, getting H/E water heater installed also...blanket the outside and insulate all water lines? Or is the insulation blanket bad for the tank...have heard they cause premature rusting from outside in..

Any advise surely appreciated.
 

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taping all joints was a good idea, but insulating duct and heat runs might be much inless you have that money to just throw around.. could be a lil costly, and helps very little. lets put it this way i dont even add insulating duct and run on my bid if they are in a basement. i do if they are in a attic. i mean you might save 5 to 10 dollars a year and it would cost so much more to install and labor hours.all most not even worth it to even do it. hope that helps
as to any other idias i cant think of any off the top of my head
:nerd:
 

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Programmable setback thermostats will save a few percent in energy costs if you have them set back for a decent amount of time. You will never realize the 30% savings touted on the thermostat blisterpacks, I assure you.

One of the best things you can do is assure that you have adequate insulation and limit air infiltration from doors and windows. In worst case scenarios, adding insulation and stopping air infiltration can slash energy costs 50%.

Depending on your geographical location, you can add a heat pump and a fossil fuel kit to your furnace. With the appropriate controls, this can run the heat pump during its optimal time, and switch to the gas or oil furnace during its optimal time.
 

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IHI said:
Anyways, I am also going to buy a humidifier. What is the "typical" percentage you guys set them at initally. I know house will factor into that but dont want it turning the house into a rain forest. Will the damper air help contribute to lower thermostat settings hence lower operating costs, or is it a wash? Either way kids and I are tired of bloody noses during winter months so it's getting installed.



Taped all my joints already, getting H/E water heater installed also...blanket the outside and insulate all water lines? Or is the insulation blanket bad for the tank...have heard they cause premature rusting from outside in..

Any advise surely appreciated.
My HVAC buddies up here in New England avoid humidifiers. The house may not become a rain-forest, but think of the moisture in your duct work...breeds mold eventually. Something to think about?
 

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help me out with this one if you can....

i thought you insulated HVAC ducts to keep them from condensating in the summer as much as to keep heat in in the winter. i could have sworn it was a code issue here in the south....i don't know for sure...any help would be appreciated....

thanks!
 

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Depends if the space the pipes are running though are conditioned or not. Basements usually are, so thats why tape and insulation are a waste. But attics are not and allot of energy can be lost up there. Generally, I dont like running ducts in unconditioned spaces because of lose. More insulation in the attic is like money in the bank now. 12" minimum.
I also think humidifiers are not a good idea unless your getting nose bleeds. All that humidity can play havoc traveling through the house envelope.
Another thing to do is caulk all exterior wall outlets switch boxes etc. Window gaskets should be replaced if needed. And windows can be taped closed. But pick a good tape and remove it in the spring. Doors can be adjusted tighter to a good gasket surfaces etc.

Or do like myself and many others. Get your chain saw out and have a blast! I fiquired that one week of work (40 hrs) and saw and truck fuel payed for my heating bill this winter. And whos to say how much that will be. Now its just not for the excersize. But a big money saving job as well. Corn burners look promising
 

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i get the theory of putting ducts in conditioned space but i see alot of the 50's and 60's ranches on crawl spaces and that just won't work. a home inspector has told me that insulated ducts are now a requirement for a clean home inspection, as much for the condensation and mold growing challenges associated with it as heat loss.

i see alot of older galvanized duct work too.....i've had some people ask me if we could just wrap them with insulation, but i somehow wonder if i'd really be doing them any favors versus replacing the ducts with the newer, prewraped stuff whick isn't to incredibily expensive, is it?? these people have typically been in thier houses for some time and can afford to do it right, i just need to know what right is.

to me, this is a subject worth understanding as energy prices continue to rise. thanks for your time!
 

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Duct work and equipment sizing/system design is very important. If you install that 90% efficent equipment and don't deliver the required CFM to the correct area, then bring it back to the equipment in correct amounts, you have waisted your money.

Time and time again you see owners putting all the money into the equipment then can't figure out why they can't keep constant accurate temperatures throughout the home, without playing with the thermostat. If you are going to take the time to insulate and seal it, make sure you get the correct amount of air where it should be, with the right size.
 

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i'm having to assume that the systems i see on occasion are using duct work left over from an original heat only system (50's and 60's) and latter tapped to distribute air conditioning as well...in the summer, i've seen the uninsulated ducts shed so much condensation it actually flowed out the crawlspace. not fast mind you, but if i didn't know where it was coming from, i'd have been real concerned about the amount of water that was under that house.

what i'm asking at this point...

are insulated ducts required in a climate control system utilizing heat and air conditioning for a clean home inspection?

are the old galvanized ducts even worth saving by trying to insulate or is it more effective to reduct the house?

thanks for the help!!
 
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