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Just a filler at the bottom. I'd cut rip from 1x4, or 2x4.
If he doesn't do that, even if he got the angles right, it would look really off to the opposing side, which is a short distance away...
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Thanks for all the advice. I'll test with some scrap to see if I can get away with padding in a filler at the bottom. If I do have to box it out, relocating the light is no problem, it isn't centered right now anyway. Should be able to run the filler to the wall on the right and normal 45 deg miter the inside corner rather than cope it. Will post photos after completion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
FYI to those asking or assuming things - I'm an electrician & plumber, framing carpenter, & will even hang drywall. Don't like the tape & mud part of that. Started doing some trim & finish carpentry the past 6 months or so. The guy that was helping me along with tips & tricks like teaching me how to think upside-down & backward died of COVID.
 

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Now that you have the carpentry approach, here's the plasterers' approach.

Cut all the crown for perfect angles, perfect fit, glue and nail together as appropriate, put in place and nail along ceiling.

Fill the gap with 5 min setting mud.

Perfect angles, no gaps, no messing around.
 

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Now that you have the carpentry approach, here's the plasterers' approach.

Cut all the crown for perfect angles, perfect fit, glue and nail together as appropriate, put in place and nail along ceiling.

Fill the gap with 5 min setting mud.

Perfect angles, no gaps, no messing around.
This.

The gap is going to be about 3”.
If the top back of the crown is snug to the existing ceiling / stair intersection, the area that would usually be a right tringle chase behind the crown will be a tight sliver wedge shape. The bottom of the crown will only be 3/8" to 3/4" off the stair underside.

Hell, it might be tight enough to put a foam backer in and caulk.

The piece of crown on the stair side wall will need to be replaced with a longer piece to be able to make the outside miter.

Extend the line of the stair underside/ceiling intersection out.
 

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1" pad, give or take1/4".
Really easy to check though. Just hold crown tight up to ceiling slope, keeping wall portion of crown vertical, & measure distance off wall.
 

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Ok, look at this. I printed a random crown molding profile full size and drew some reference lines. The image i downloaded and printed had the 2-1/8” and 3” reference marks and i confirmed they were accurate after printing.

I then drew the ceiling line flush with the top of the molding, and an imaginary vertical line at the back of the lower part of the crown. I then drew a 7” rise/11” run line A to indicate the assumed underside of the stair enclosure. Note that we don’t know the size of the installed crown or the slope of the stairs, so these dimensions are reasonable assumptions. Because someone asserted (falsely in my opinion) that the stair slope is 45* I also drew line B.

Since the sketch is full scale, the gap at the bottom of the molding can be directly measured, and it varies between 3-1/16” (what i had stated initially) and 1-7/16”. Both potential dimensions are far too great to be packed with any kind of joint compound or caulk.

The molding profile was taken from mouldingsone.com


Slope Rectangle Schematic Font Triangle
 

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Ok, look at this. I printed a random crown molding profile full size and drew some reference lines. The image i downloaded and printed had the 2-1/8” and 3” reference marks and i confirmed they were accurate after printing.

I then drew the ceiling line flush with the top of the molding, and an imaginary vertical line at the back of the lower part of the crown. I then drew a 7” rise/11” run line A to indicate the assumed underside of the stair enclosure. Note that we don’t know the size of the installed crown or the slope of the stairs, so these dimensions are reasonable assumptions. Because someone asserted (falsely in my opinion) that the stair slope is 45* I also drew line B.

Since the sketch is full scale, the gap at the bottom of the molding can be directly measured, and it varies between 3-1/16” (what i had stated initially) and 1-7/16”. Both potential dimensions are far too great to be packed with any kind of joint compound or caulk.

The molding profile was taken from mouldingsone.com


View attachment 521729
Both potential dimensions are far too great to be packed with any kind of joint compound or caulk.
Good tracking thus down and drawing it out. One detail, I said 5 minute, not joint compound. 5 minute is plaster based. I absolutely can fill that.
 

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CBNC...
Good drawing, but probably not accurate to used crown.

I see it as std 4 1/4" 52/38 spring angle crown. I get crown scale from width of wall end being 4 3/4" on a std 2x4 wall with DW. Observed crown is about 1/2" smaller than wall width from scaling.

As far as stair slope, extend out pictured wall to clg lines. It's most likely 42' or so stair slope. Crown top may be a bit smaller than my drwg, but probably still 1/4"+ wide at clg.
Handwriting Slope Triangle Rectangle Parallel
 

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I won't argue about the specific crown profile used, it could be anything. We are both wasting time guessing about the slope of the stairs, the OP needs to step up and be part of the discussion, and give measurements. But … you can’t shave the back of the crown, too much chance of altering the installed angle and messing with the miter. That’s why the best solution to the situation would be to build a vertical section under the stairs.
 
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