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The trap most fall into is that "there is only X amount of masonry above it". If it doesn't naturally arch it carries the full weight of what is sitting upon it. A 12' angle on a 20' gable end can be the same size or smaller than a 12' angle with 2' or 3' of masonry above it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
I guess I should update this. Turned out the original steel was 3.5x3.5x5/16" I put in a 4x 6.6x3/8"

The wood header has actually sagged quite a bit. As much as the angle iron, there was a very slight crack in the drywall that I hadn't seen when I was doing my initial look around, it was up above the plywood that held bracket for the garage door chain so it wasn't visible until i got on a ladder. The header is a piece or rough cut 4"x12".

The owners decided not to replace the header..their call, but I didn't attach any brick ties to it in case someone wanted to replace it down the road.
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Good idea but no didn't. I doubt they would have gone for it. The angle is pretty beefy, I'm confident it will last. Also the old angle only had 4" of bearing either side, it now has a bit over 10" either side. That should help considerably
 

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BIA has as alternate method for up to 18' opening residential garage door lintels, using a lighter angle iron, and several courses of 9gauge durawall in the bed joints directly above and a foot or two up another group of durawall
A few dead legs are required for a week or so.

The paranoid can poke in some cut up durawall scraps vertically through the horizontal truss wire for added shear strength.

the durawall extending at least 8" past the jambs and properly lapped.

On a Double door, the 14-16 pieces of wire wouldn't be much cheaper than a big lintel, But, used with medium sized steel they'll reduce the sag alot
 

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Back in the 70's and earlier some timber windows and doors had the brickwork running over the top with no lintels, just 3 courses of this in the bed joints. The inside block or brick had a concrete lintel.
download.jpg

Worked OK until the windows were replaced with plastic ones, and then the brickwork dropped a bit causing problems with jamming doors etc.
 

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Same theory/ method, the steel wire provides the tensile strength for a laid in place brick lintel. No superimposed loads allowed though.

If they had laid the "brick Top" in a bed joint spread on the false work under the first course over the windows, no sagging brick on the window repairs, but more finishing for the masons.

One story construction only? i.e under soffits /no flashing?

For a short period, pre 1973 oil crisis, there were S(ociety) C(eramic) R(esearch) clay units 6" wide, 2.33"&(4") tall by 12-16" with groutable(just bearly) cores for vertical rebar wire scores for horizontal rebar. 6 to 10 story apartments by rule of thumb almost. Cavity insulated walls killed it.

THere is a six story apt. in town that still looks good 40 years later. A ten story one in College town that is a crack fest appearence wise, no CJs, oops.
"
 

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Seen the sheet metal bent lintel, Trade named after the inventor builder? can't recall it... save a couple of pounds money and weight every window in steel.

I'm suprised the LEED/Eco manure hasn't encouraged their use to cut heat flow over openings.

In Florida there is a galvanised 16 gauge scored surface 8" square pre made lintel single use form, the tin is the tensile element for up to ~8' openings then you start adding rebars in the form cavity. Less planning than precast,no hoists needed and salt tested,

Having missed out on the Luftwaffe bombing and fires, building codes here aren't to worried about firestorms in the suburbs, even our duplexs and town homes ~Row houses almost have mostly wood structures with the masonry just as expensive siding. :sad: 1" of dry wall as the "firewall".
 

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Seen the sheet metal bent lintel, Trade named after the inventor builder? can't recall it... save a couple of pounds money and weight every window in steel.

I'm suprised the LEED/Eco manure hasn't encouraged their use to cut heat flow over openings.

In Florida there is a galvanised 16 gauge scored surface 8" square pre made lintel single use form, the tin is the tensile element for up to ~8' openings then you start adding rebars in the form cavity. Less planning than precast,no hoists needed and salt tested,
They get left in place. Not sure how long the stucco will stick to it was the main concern, but setting them was like setting a feather pillow. My guys eyes would brighten right up when the 17'4" was on the job. Some days those precast ones are extra heavy, esp. when your down to 8 guys that day.
 

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Fjn, not the same thing, that an older multi-wythe method for brick soffits, I laid them on churches for the pre iron lintel look. They are a pita to align. We end up pre "casting" laying the soffits on two shiskabob rebars, in a jig, let cure a day or two then hang the nearly flat assemblely from the piers.

I haven't been able to find the "tech" notes on the single wythe garage door durawall technique, I'm thinking it was published in Masonry Construction about 10-16 years ago about the same they changed the residential code to allow floating "chimney" boxes on doubled up wood roof trusses.

I 'd change the 8" bearing of the wire to at least 12" or hook the ends 2" into a head joint and switch to 3/16" side wire Durawall if it were availiable on the bottom course for 18' openings after rereading the old school methods. Start CJs at the ends of wire above the head of the door. Again the dead legs till cure are critical, getting the other subs/general to leave them undistrubed as they block easy delivery into the "shop"/garage space...
 
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