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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm in the process of putting together a proposal for some new windows on a remodeling project. Two of the windows are Andersen Bow windows, and I came to find out the bay and bow windows are not energy star rated. This means no Tax credit on these windows. I spoke with my Andersen rep and he told me it's because the top and bottom of these windows aren't insulated, and they don't know how they will be finished after install.

So my question is this... If I frame out the top and bottom of the window and insulate these areas can someone certify them, giving the homeowner the ability to get their credit on these?

Or option two: Frame an opening like a bow and install single units?

Any help or suggestions are appreciated
 

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I like Green things
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I think you may be stuck with option #2.

I am going through 2 good sized window jobs right now from andersen, and am trying to get each window/door spec'ed to meet the requirements for the credit as well.

Casements from them need nothing to meet, tilt wash's have to have the grills applied on the inside, same with the doors.

Customers wonder why it takes so long to get a window/door proposal back to them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I just spoke with my energy consultant, and he said it is possible to certify the windows upon install. The draw back to doing this is the time it takes for the process to be completed, and the cost of all the testing needed. So I deem this not worth while, but he did fill me in on some other very interesting info.

I actually spoke with him a couple months ago about this program. The program is the BPI cert. course. I don't know how this applies in other states, but here is the run down in NJ. Once you become a BPI certified contractor you can have a home energy audited. The way this works is, if the audit shows you could save between 5-30 percent on you energy bills by replacing windows (doors, insul etc.) you can get the 30 percent federal credit on energy star products. On top of this the homeowner can get a $2000 rebate, reimbursed for the audit and a $1000 towards air sealing.

Now, if you can achieve a 30 percent savings on energy cost that $2000 goes up to 50 percent on labor and materials, with a cap of $10,000.:eek: This only applies if you're a contractor with a BPI cert.

Guess what class I'm going to take next
 

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I just spoke with my energy consultant, and he said it is possible to certify the windows upon install. The draw back to doing this is the time it takes for the process to be completed, and the cost of all the testing needed. So I deem this not worth while, but he did fill me in on some other very interesting info.

I actually spoke with him a couple months ago about this program. The program is the BPI cert. course. I don't know how this applies in other states, but here is the run down in NJ. Once you become a BPI certified contractor you can have a home energy audited. The way this works is, if the audit shows you could save between 5-30 percent on you energy bills by replacing windows (doors, insul etc.) you can get the 30 percent federal credit on energy star products. On top of this the homeowner can get a $2000 rebate, reimbursed for the audit and a $1000 towards air sealing.

Now, if you can achieve a 30 percent savings on energy cost that $2000 goes up to 50 percent on labor and materials, with a cap of $10,000.:eek: This only applies if you're a contractor with a BPI cert.

Guess what class I'm going to take next

Who does the certification?
 

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I will have to double check , but am thinking that the bays I buy locally are energy star rated. The window have the sticker on them am pretty sure.
 
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