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Very nice. Looks like a massive chimney.
Is there an advantage to using copper over galv, or is it just asthetic?
 

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Connecticut has a great history of Italian masonry contractors and seems it is still continuing. You seem to be able to do what is needed in a first class way.

Are your projects around Hartford or the lower post road/I95 area where there is some money and the desire to fit in properly?

I lived in CT for about a year and went to many mason contractors meetings and got to understand the feel and competition. When I went to my first meeting they had tags made out and I was the only one that did not have an "I" or "O" as the last letter. The next meeting, they added a "O" to my last name and pelted me with rolls from the bread basket. - Is there still an "Italian Society" house south and west of Hartford?
 

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Connecticut has a great history of Italian masonry contractors and seems it is still continuing. You seem to be able to do what is needed in a first class way.

Are your projects around Hartford or the lower post road/I95 area where there is some money and the desire to fit in properly?

I lived in CT for about a year and went to many mason contractors meetings and got to understand the feel and competition. When I went to my first meeting they had tags made out and I was the only one that did not have an "I" or "O" as the last letter. The next meeting, they added a "O" to my last name and pelted me with rolls from the bread basket. - Is there still an "Italian Society" house south and west of Hartford?
Do you remember some guys out of Uncasville, I think it was a father/son operation......Richard Kirsch was the son I think.... Thames Permacrete? We used to get a lot of stuff from them....I'm not even sure they exist anymore......my dad was one of the few non Italians in the biz, but only because his partnership with the Cardile bros. had ended.

I remember those days like they were yesterday....he ran a union shop, but many of the guys worked fairly steadily for him for many years......it was funny, most everybody identified through their lineage back then, and knew others the same way, mostly Italian, but some Poles, (Polacks really, never heard the word 'Pole') Frenchmen, a German, and just a small handful whose names would have come from the UK....

You must have been there some time ago......I haven't heard 'the post road' for a long time...:laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
copper for asthetics

Very nice. Looks like a massive chimney.
Is there an advantage to using copper over galv, or is it just asthetic?
the copper more expensive and at today's prices only the high end jobs warrant it....it's easier to solder too as you can't burn through it.


lead is just as nice imo harder to solder but not bad if the soldering iron tips are sharp and clean...they sem to pit all the time and it screws up the bead and placement of the weld then when you try to do it again you burn through.

Forever cleaning the irons.

This particular job the owner's dad was a large plumbing contractor in Torington CT. he pitched in a large roll he had kicking around..lives just across the lake from his daughter.
Nice guy and so very smart...."Art Cisco I hope your doing ok".. he is getting on in years and had bad arthritis!

I never heard of galvanized ..there used to be tin that would last for years...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
ethnics don't matter the person ''type" is key.

Do you remember some guys out of Uncasville, I think it was a father/son operation......Richard Kirsch was the son I think.... Thames Permacrete? We used to get a lot of stuff from them....I'm not even sure they exist anymore......my dad was one of the few non Italians in the biz, but only because his partnership with the Cardile bros. had ended.

I remember those days like they were yesterday....he ran a union shop, but many of the guys worked fairly steadily for him for many years......it was funny, most everybody identified through their lineage back then, and knew others the same way, mostly Italian, but some Poles, (Polacks really, never heard the word 'Pole') Frenchmen, a German, and just a small handful whose names would have come from the UK....

You must have been there some time ago......I haven't heard 'the post road' for a long time...



No don't know them....that's by the casino near Rhode Island.
I never worked that way exept once.I helped an Italian mason out doing a library....he kept puttiing me on layout and then complaining the joints were too tight! He had already done some block work before I and my laborer started and he didn't like the contrasting styles....lol. He bitched because I was packing in the grout too much ....he made it real dry purposely to save money.....and I kept adding enough water to pack it!

I stood three days and got away as he wa a real shoe-maker!
So see they come in all flavors...I have a Italian mason friend whom is similarly mediocre at best! He actually went in the mason business after his father [whom changed from being a butcher to a mason] left for florida.
The guy was a laborer for his dad up to when he started his company! I have a Irish friend whoes family were all great brickys, but he's lowsy..anything goes, builds fps hollow with a 2ft level, meandering all the way up truely pathetic,.. fat butt joints bigger than a thumb!
His wife is a hair dresser at a hospital whom continuously gets him jobs with elderly people whom are disadvantaged in more than one way.

He charged/charges an old lady 4000 to stop her f.p. from leaking! He stages it takes the top off and pours slurry down it until full!
I stopped by once as he was finishing....I noticed the flashing had separated at the roof, so I said, here's the problem. He said Ya I'm gonna caulk it!
He spent about 4 short lazy days there and 200 on matereials if that!

Imagine if someone down the road lights it and heats it!

The old generations were from a hardened generation whom were pretty much humiliated when they came here. The preceeding imigrants from other countries always made things hard on successors...it's how it was.

One things for certain though, they had alot of masonry!
There was....plaster/ stucco/ block foundations/ porches/ fireplaces/ and stone basements and walls..... There was always a 55 gal drum of hot lime slacking in the barn.

The old man would say to me 2 bags of portland to a basement,,,the rest was lime...and the outside stones were basically dry untill just below grade!

I'll bet many here don't know that sears robuck sold houses after the war. They came out with sheet rock which they tried to have white coated! My dad said they would put one room on then two then three and it wouldnt dry...they ended up doing the hole house, an still wet. The sheet rock was later flipped backwards like rock lath [stopped that now too around here in new england] then it worked...but then tape and compound came out.

I used to here the storys of masons laying 1200 brick a day...but they were three courses wide and somtimes 16'' lol.
 

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There is one brick layer around here that is supposed to be the fastest in the city. A brit named Basil routinely lays 1200 bricks a day (ontario sized brick, a bit bigger than your imperial modular and commercial jobs). Not the best walls ever but lots of bricks thrown in. I've heard this claim from lots of guys who've worked with him. Most jobs I do I'm lucky to install 300 in a day. Too many doors and windows, soldier courses, stacked bond etc...
 

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Bragging about brick count gets you one thing, long runs all day long while the guys who arnt full of themselves get to do quoins, arches and other fun detail stuff.

Carry on bragging. lol.
 

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Bragging about brick count gets you one thing, long runs all day long while the guys who arnt full of themselves get to do quoins, arches and other fun detail stuff.

Carry on bragging. lol.
depends on how you get paid though. Paid by the brick/sqft, give me a long wall any day of the week. Paid by the hour...who cares. Right now I'd kill for a 500 brick day just for the satisfaction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
long walls nice to pump and dump ...blow the carbon out

depends on how you get paid though. Paid by the brick/sqft, give me a long wall any day of the week. Paid by the hour...who cares. Right now I'd kill for a 500 brick day just for the satisfaction.
I agree Sean...stand at one spot all day during the winter sucks esp. at my age.....I used to look down at my laborers playing near the fire barrell and envy them.....

I remember a 1200' long sidewalk I did on main st seymour ct.back in the 80's. I had to lay pavers on the 4'' slab we poured in 1'' cement mortar bed. It was averaged 14' wide to 18 at the otherend. I set up leads on the inside against the buildings and line bocked on the new granite curbs at the roadside and laid the brick, tooled the butt joints and my dad and another guy tucked the long joints following me.
One day I felt like kong when I stopped to tally the count as I laid 20' worth or 1260 brick. The old man never could understand how I could squat for 8 hrs and now, neither can I..lol.
If you put 700 in a wall and they are are nicely jointed when looking up at them that's a good day's work. There was a conveinient store there where all the masons came and gauked ...lol ate it up as a young rooster....as I knew some had bid against me.....
 

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The union here has a saying. 480 minutes in a day 480 bricks to lay, which is the sort of informal quota that a journeyman bricklayer is supposed to install in a day laying to the line. For most commercial companies that is a minimum and if a guy is only laying that many in a day then he's the first to be let go, but...These are commercial jobs, there is sometimes a 3-2 bricklayer-labourer ratio, forklifts hydraulic scaffolding etc...Walls that are 500 sqft with only 2 openings, zero detail work, just throwing bricks to a line. I rarely, extremely rarely get to lay more than 20 bricks in a course and that's usually above a garage door for maybe 2 or 3 feet,

to just say how many bricks you install in a day without figuring out the added manpower and the design of the building is just plain silly
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The union here has a saying. 480 minutes in a day 480 bricks to lay, which is the sort of informal quota that a journeyman bricklayer is supposed to install in a day laying to the line. For most commercial companies that is a minimum and if a guy is only laying that many in a day then he's the first to be let go, but...These are commercial jobs, there is sometimes a 3-2 bricklayer-labourer ratio, forklifts hydraulic scaffolding etc...Walls that are 500 sqft with only 2 openings, zero detail work, just throwing bricks to a line. I rarely, extremely rarely get to lay more than 20 bricks in a course and that's usually above a garage door for maybe 2 or 3 feet,

to just say how many bricks you install in a day without figuring out the added manpower and the design of the building is just plain silly
If you refer to me ....and If I'm being braggish I didn't mean it,.. but it felt good, as I said.
It wasn't a wall anyhow and of course "it was a team effort" with two guys tucking the long joints and a laborer stacking brick behind me. All the circumstances were good hot and dry in fact I recall wetting with a brush the droppings and smearing them like a slury. I would lean a brick evey 3 I layed, to stop slide back as I was squeezing some mud, about half into the side joints via a bi directional shove method. i.e. no buttering at all
I mentioned the added help to joint as it's understood on a slab you simply cant, your backing up constantly...heck most sweep dry powder in.
It aint easy squatting and moving back like that...it was a once in life time thing and I'm cognizant of varied brick laying skill levels / constraints ...heck I'm a orton slant advocate remember. I spend all day doing one and an hour or more the next morning..reg bond.

No one's security is threatened...there's always viagra at the coffee wagon for those who can't bend! lol

I found some clippings I'll post.

ps I know what you are saying.... small residential masonry. Always cut up walls/ lintels/ flashing/ ties/ stage up/ under manned or perhaps worse being over manned with inadiquate-s.;)
 
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