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Artisan Carpentry
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a thread for finish carpentry details you have probably never seen before. This is the trim style I will be using in my master bedroom (hopefully this winter). It is what I call "nautilus rosette" style. The head trim set is wider than the casing legs and it returns around on itself (like a nautilus shell--sorta). If you look close the casing is still mitered, but it is a short miter (like in a jack miter), due to the rosette.

The first time I saw this, I really did a double take.:blink:

I'm sure we can come up with a series of this kind of stuff.
 

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I like that detail but it looks labor intensive.

Is that side casing one solid piece or is it built up?

Did you make all those components?

I need to see some pictures of it being assembled. Get cracking on that and post them right away. ;)
 

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Artisan Carpentry
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I like that detail but it looks labor intensive.

Is that side casing one solid piece or is it built up?

Did you make all those components?

I need to see some pictures of it being assembled. Get cracking on that and post them right away. ;)
A standard door casing set is 3 pieces. The Victorian built-up set I did this summer was 15 pieces. This one is 3 on each leg, 4 on the head and each nautilus rosette is 9 pieces... total is 28 pieces per set (one side of door opening).

Piece of cake.:jester:

Cheers,

Basswood
 

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Artisan Carpentry
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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Did you find that in an Asia restaurant?Looks like casing on an old bank vault
That is in this Victorian Home (and this is what Victorian Vault Casing looks like):
 

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Artisan Carpentry
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Great, you are going to go and cheap out on the insides of the closet!!:laughing:
Yep. I'm sure I'll have enough time in this... just on the side you see.:rolleyes:

I am shocked to hear that as well. I thought Bass took more pride in his work than that.
I be slackin':laughing:

What type of material will you be using?

Stain grade I assume.

Can't wait to see some progress pics. this winter.
I'm going to use Yellow-poplar stained to look like cherry.

Here is an update on the geometry...It appears that this "nautilus rosette," as I have been calling it, is indeed related to the "Golden Ratio" of ancient Greece (which has been applied to the Nautilus shell geometry).

I still need to get measurements to see how much is golden ratio based. I found out the form is called a ‘square spiral’.

The square spiral has been used to derive a "spiro-fibonacci" sequence. Fibonacci sequences are interesting strings of numbers and some are close approximations of the Golden Ratio.

--"A square spiral is a discrete version of an Archimedean spiral, where square boxes are chosen in a spiral, one after the other, from a tessellation of square boxes."

http://borve.org/primeness/spirofib.html

Here is a graphic of this "square spiral" and related images (including the classic application of the golden ratio to the Parthenon):

Cheers,

Bass
 

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Artisan Carpentry
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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Isn't it the old 1:7 ratio thing.
The ratio is 1: 1.618... it is an irrational number that keeps going and going and going (like pi), but this one is called phi.

Using the pixels in the original photo, I found out that the central carving and the larger rectangle that contains the carving have the proportions of the golden rectangle (35x57 and 45x72 pixels), but when the pattern leaves the central block it leaves within the block, rather than adding a layer on top of the block, this changes the rectangle pattern into more of a square. This morphs the design from the golden rectangle into a "square spiral."

Both patterns have Fibonacci sequences associated with them and both go back to ancient times.

Whether the designer intended this I can't say for sure. Sometimes we just find the patterns we are looking for.

By the way the Acanthus leaf carving also goes back to Greece.

Regards,

Bass
 

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Did you find that in an Asia restaurant?Looks like casing on an old bank vault
....... This morphs the design from the golden rectangle into a "square spiral."

Both patterns have Fibonacci sequences associated with them and both go back to ancient times.

Whether the designer intended this I can't say for sure. Sometimes we just find the patterns we are looking for.

By the way the Acanthus leaf carving also goes back to Greece.

Regards,

Bass
It looks like one variation of
the "Greek Key" pattern in borders
and crown, and entablatures.
(That word always puts spellcheck in a knot.) :laughing:
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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Looks like the only piece that is carved is the leaf itself. The rest looks like mitered stock and a small molding on the interior of the wrap.
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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Mitersaw or tablesaw with a 45* sled. Inquiring minds want to know.


I just recently made a nice 45* sled. I have had a 90* sled for a decade. I have also marked my saw at what o'clock the handle goes for 90* and 45*, no guesswork anymore.
 

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I find you can't get the accuracy with a chopsaw that you can get with the TS.
 
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