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DavidC
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2,550 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
or two. I liked Stonecutter's techniques and wanted to try myself. We're getting ready for our local home show and these will be going along.

First the forms;



The table is an insulated torsion box. Over that I have a 36"x12' sheet of laminate installed with double sided tape. The form sides are strips of melamine and installed with hot glue weld on the outside edges. The insides are sealed with clay for water tight fit and a formed edge.

This will be a two piece with a straight seam. After the show it will be installed as desk tops in our office, unless we accidentally sell them. On the end are two 18x24x3/4" that I'll do my experiments in. I didn't think to photo the other two piece form. No room on the table so that was made on sheets of melamine.

Here's the desk tops filled;



These are wet cast with the forms seeded with colored glass bits. The gravel in the mix was selected for the colors in it. After curing it will be flipped and ground to expose the glass and gravel. No dyes were harmed for this project.

This one would be more like Stonecutter's fireplace piece;



This is two forms butted together at the seam. The mix was a dry sand mix hand pressed into the form. For sand I used 1/2 black and 1/2 white. Only needed a little black dye to come up with a nice charcoal color.

Here we got the molds tore down, separated and flipped the pieces. That box is the buff dye for the first slurry.



Good Luck
Dave
 

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DavidC
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2,550 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
First slurry is on;



This slurry was white portland, sand and buff dye. When I first mixed it I almost chucked it. Last time I saw this color I was cleaning out the calf's pen.

But after a little quality time with 100 grit disc and it looked more appealing to me;



At this point I'm not really loving the colors but am sold on the process. This is wicked cool to work with. Thanks be to Stonecutter for that last kick in the pants to start me.

We used a mold insert for this alleged bull nose. It's very slight, but much easier on the hands for the leading edges.



Good Luck
Dave
 

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DavidC
Joined
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2,550 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
The wet cast pieces were relocated to the outer shop;



The view ain't bad if you remember to look up once in awhile;



These will get ground with a 50 grit until they show their stuff. I've gotten started on that but have a ways to go tomorrow to get it there. The dry pack pieces are finished with the slurry and polishing. More pics tomorrow.

Good Luck
Dave
 

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Premium Member
Honolulu, Hawaii
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17,965 Posts
I love that stuff, thanks for the detailed post:thumbsup:
 

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Construction Connoissuer
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2,024 Posts
Beautiful :thumbsup:

I got to run out now - have a busy day planned, but I will be back to take some time reviewing this thread - so I can get a better look at it!
 

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DavidC
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2,550 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
The final slurry was straight grey portland paste. I was going to use white but my son walked in and suggested grey just in time. I'm glad he did.



I switched to a 200 grit for the last slurry clean up. Once that was done I wet the slabs with Lithium silicate and polished that until it started to dry in place. Then a water bath and scrub, rinse.

For me, the third color saved it. I like it again. I'm hoping time allows me to flip the over to touch up the backsides. I didn't trowel it much and it's rough. The show time is coming up fast so don't know if I'll make that.

The sealer will by Xylexin for these pieces.

I'm not sure on the black sand, I think it's crushed shale. It's sold as leveling sand for patio pavers. The grains are longer than wide and very sharp. And it sucks up the water so I have to keep a careful eye on the consistency.

I thought this bait would work for catching Crow! Good to see you Jim.

Good Luck
Dave
 

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DavidC
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2,550 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Nice shop location. It must be hard to work when the fish are jumping..
This year the snow geese paid a visit on their way home. We'll see Canada geese almost all year round. River beavers, muskrats and an occasional mink. Not to mention all manner of fish.

Some days the river is placid, like a lake. That's when I have a hard time with the distraction.

Good Luck
Dave
 

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DavidC
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2,550 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I like playing with masonry tools and pretending I have an Italian heritage. But the truth is my heritage is more Scottish so we keep molds handy for the overage. We use these as freebies for our clients that purchase concrete counter tops.



That's a white portland, white sand mix with white titanium dye.

Good Luck
Dave
 

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DavidC
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2,550 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Note to self: Cover the pieces in the outer shop for overnights, lunch and other extended breaks.

Alternate plan: Brush up on BS skills so you can explain that those stains are naturally occurring and part of the beauty of the piece.

Good Luck
Dave
 

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Construction Connoissuer
Joined
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2,024 Posts
Note to self: Cover the pieces in the outer shop for overnights, lunch and other extended breaks.

Alternate plan: Brush up on BS skills so you can explain that those stains are naturally occurring and part of the beauty of the piece.

Good Luck
Dave
Brutal - but handled like a true professional :whistling

:laughing:
 

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DavidC
Joined
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2,550 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
BS beats careful planning 9 times out of 10
So true, so true. But it seems to have worked out ok. Here's the prime suspect;



I was able to remove the stains completely. When careful planning takes a back seat and the BS skills need polishing, I'll take dumb luck any day.

This has been some of the most intense grinding I've done to date. I expected to see more gravel by now. After about 12+ hrs. of working it I will take this as what I get.



The clear glass (above) doesn't show that well in the pic, kind of looks like more gravel here. On this end is bits of green glass;



I'm thinking it's either real dense concrete or the gravel didn't make it to near enough the surface. I'm leaning toward the density because you can almost see the gravel beneath the surface. It just refuses to pop.

Today it gets another slurry coat and more polishing while the other pieces will get sealed with xylexin.

Temps have returned to more like normal for this time of year so I closed the outer shop until further notice. Grinding time increases when you have to stop to thaw your fingers. Moved inside for today.

Good Luck
Dave
 
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