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Discussion Starter #1
Ok guys, I have a question. A gc wants me to put some cultured stone on the foundation which runs with the grade. I am going to put ice and water shield for a waterproofing but then I have to attach the metal lathe to foundation so I can put my scratchcoat on. What do you think would be the best method for this? I was thinkin ramset .22 cal for it but not sure. Any ideas are welcome.
 

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DGR,IABD
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That's always the way I've seen it done. They have ramset pins that already have the fender washer on them, which should make attaching your wire lath a lot easier.
 

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6string,
What does the foundation look like now? If it is rough at all, you really don't need any scratchcoat for cultured stone. Don't get me wrong, I scratchcoat 99 percent of the time, but I don't think this necessarily calls for it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Foundation is smooth. I spose I could take my nazi saw and score the face of it in a cross hatch pattern. What about waterproofing though. I think it should be waterproofed which in turn would mean I have to put lathe down and scratchcoat.
 

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6string,
If the part of the foundation that you are cultured stoning is above grade, why worry about waterproofing?

Around here, they sell something called Weldcrete, looks like a blue paint, that helps with adhesion, for bonding to concrete surfaces. I would paint the foundation with that, then cultured stone right over the foundation. I would either use thin set, or add the acrylic fortifyer to regular mortar. I know, weird not doing a lathe/scratchcoat...but I don't think this calls for it! (Unless there's something to do with the cold weather up there that I don't know about).

By the way, I am a mason/guitarist/in my 20's too!
 

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Mike-
Not entirely sure about acrylic stucco. The Weldcrete product says it can be used for bonding 2 cementitious surfaces. I'm not sure that acrylic stucco can be considered cementitious...I've only done stucco with mortar. Here's the website with specs if you wanna check it out.
http://www.larsenproducts.com/weldcrete.htm

6string,
That's most likely what I would do but obviously, I can't see the job that you're talking about. The part that you're cultured stoning is all above grade right? I'd clean the foundation reallly really good (acid solution if it happens to be real dirty, probably not), apply the weldcrete product, then lay the cultured stone - I'd prob use mortar w/ acrylic additive, but thin-set is good too, I've used both.

This weldcrete stuff is like paint, you paint it on. It's blue. Goes on a lot faster than a lathe/scratchcoat!

Again, I almost always do a scratchcoat, but I don't think it's necessary here. If you feel the need to do a scratchcoat, you can score scratches into the foundation, then apply your scratchcoat. Sometimes there's a lot of ways to do things!
 

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Mike, A concrete fire pit is not a good idea because the portland cement will expand and pop the face of the concrete if you have a nice hot fire. This is the reason you must use refractory cement when laying up a fire box. A good hot fire will pop the joints in a hurry. Take a piece of old broken concrete and set it next to a hot fire and you will see what I mean. You would probably be alright if you are just building small two or three log fires and the concrete wall is a distance from the flame.
I guess if the concrete wall was thick enough(6'-10") the heat would disapate and the outside of the wall would be alright. Just a guess though. To answer our question about the Weldcrete. Yes, it is used to bond stucco to old concrete. I've seen a lot of plasterers use it just for this.
 

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Life-Long-Learner
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If the foundation is a concrete poured foundation, you can acid wash the foundation and apply the scratch coat directly to the foundation. If it is a block foundation, Ice and water is a good choice. I did a rock job with a block foundation this past summer, totaling 7,000sqft, and I put up ice and water. The next part to me two 13 hour days to do. I started hanging the lath by tapping the foundation with a Hilti Hammer Drill and securing the lath with nail Rivets with a half inch head from Fastenel. All in All, saved me money in the long run, if I were working free. If your using the .22 rounds, you better stock up, Obama is takin em away!!!!:furious:

Be sure you hang the lath the correct way, I dont know how to explain it, but there is a way. But you prolly know that.

What brand and style of rock are you using?

Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter #11
If the foundation is a concrete poured foundation, you can acid wash the foundation and apply the scratch coat directly to the foundation. If it is a block foundation, Ice and water is a good choice. I did a rock job with a block foundation this past summer, totaling 7,000sqft, and I put up ice and water. The next part to me two 13 hour days to do. I started hanging the lath by tapping the foundation with a Hilti Hammer Drill and securing the lath with nail Rivets with a half inch head from Fastenel. All in All, saved me money in the long run, if I were working free. If your using the .22 rounds, you better stock up, Obama is takin em away!!!!:furious:

Be sure you hang the lath the correct way, I dont know how to explain it, but there is a way. But you prolly know that.

What brand and style of rock are you using?


Good Luck
This was 4 years ago, but if I remember correctly I think I ended up not using the ice and water, and just using the ramset to attack the lathe. It must still be fine because I havent been called back.
 

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wow your right...talk about dragging up an old thread.
 
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