Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

aluminum residue on brick

1821 Views 6 Replies 4 Participants Last post by  yourfriend
Hi all. Just wondering whats the best way of takeing off aluminum residue of my bricks being caused by my sideing?
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Without pics it would be purely conjecture on our part.If it is aluminum siding more than likely it is the chalking of the paint,not aluminum. As stated,need pics.
Below is a Google search that may interest you:

https://www.google.com/#q=remove+aluminum+siding+stains+from+brick

From the sidelines apart from the professionals who have already replied,
their request for pictures seems necessary. You'll notice that this URL on cleaning paint stains from aluminum siding

https://www.google.com/#q=remove+aluminum+siding+paint+stains+from+brick

doesn't present an exact overlap of methods with the first search that dealt with stains from
degeneration of the aluminum itself.

Since we're both going to be cleaning brick, I found the overall sweep of this article to present informative guidelines on any brick cleaning:

http://www.gobrick.com/portals/25/docs/technical%20notes/tn20.pdf

That's all I can offer. The smart guys will have more for you.
See less See more
  • Like
Reactions: 2
Thanks for the web sites. I'll let you know how it went
Nexstar7:

You are, of course, welcome.

From my quick scan of a few sites, I noticed a
fair amount of disagreement on the ending result of some of the same methods.
Once you have determined what the exact source of your difficulty, you might
want to ask the masons here on the methods you are considering.
After many years separation from chemistry, I did recall that lye
(sodium hydroxide) was one method of attacking aluminum. We're not sure
that aluminum stains are the problem here but if they are, there were some mentions on the web of lye being used to clean it off brick. You all may have
more to say on that.

Aside, if you ever want to dissolve or attack some aluminum that may be mashed
into marriage with something or otherwise joined that it cannot be more easily removed, take a look at this video where a jammed aluminum seat post on a bicycle is being dissolved with lye:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-dYnSVVDxrE

Accepting that the stub of the aluminum seat post is in the bike frame, you might economize your time by watching the video from 3:00 to 3:30 and about 6:00 minutes to the end.

Note that a refined version of this procedure is used to evolve flammable hydrogen gas in chem lab demonstrations and never forget lye is a nasty customer.
See less See more
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top