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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Jesus ol mighty im so tired of givn these low down dirty fks estimates... From now on ima just bid myself out over the phone... These guy have no concept whatso ever what it costs to do quality resto work... Always wanting to put a bandaide over a bullet wound and their paying clients always get fken left with a **** ass contractor... Thank god I dont have any of my coverage with them.
 

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They know EXACTLY what they are doing.....:whistling

Check out there training program.

Ed



http://www.injurytriallawyer.com/bl...d-billions-by-shortchanging-policyholders.cfm

Insurance Coverage Disputes & Bad Faith Claims

7/25/2008
Christopher M. Davis

From Good Hands to Boxing Gloves: How Allstate Has Earned Billions by Shortchanging Policyholders & Claimants




The book From Good Hands to Boxing Gloves: The Dark Side of Insurance


(2008) by David J. Berardinelli, discusses how Allstate revolutionized the claims handling process by implementing policies to diliberately reduce benefits and claim payouts by intentionally paying out less than the true value of the claim.


Mr. Berardinelli states that our insurance system is founded on two key rules: the indemnity principle and the fiduciary principle.


Together these principles are intended to level the playing field between the insurance company and the policyholder. These principles balance the insurer’s legitimate goal of being profitable while allowing the insured policyholders to get prompt and fair payment for covered losses.


Mr. Berardinelli states that casualty insurance is a unique insurance product. It’s different from other kinds of insurance like life insurance. Life insurance pays a set benefit when you die regardless of the cause or consequences of your death. But casualty insurance is indemnity coverage. It doesn’t pay a set benefit. It pays as much as the policyholder needs, up to the policy’s limit, "to restore an insured to the same financial position after the loss that he or she was in prior to the loss."


To indemnify someone means to make them whole again. That means the insured doesn’t get paid more than the actual loss. It also means the insured shouldn’t get paid less than what it takes to make the insured whole again. The insurance company's duty is to pay the full amount the policy holder needs to be put back in the same position he or she was in before the loss. This is called the indemnity principle.


Mr. Bernadelli states that Allstate implemented a program to intentionally pay out less than the true value of claims.


Essentially, Allstate intentionally violated the indemnity principle, leaving policyholders and claimants much less than the insurance coverage they were entitled to receive.


How did Allstate accomplish this? Well Allstate often deliberately delays paying legitimate claims by asking for useless information or demanding more proof than it really needs. It would delay payment or force policyholders to jump through needless hoops, in hopes they’ll give up or take less than the full and fair amount of the benefits they’re owed under the policy. Allstate paid for studies which showed that nearly 85% of claimants would accept whatever lowball offer Allstate made, and not bother with the hassle. When you are talking about hundreds of thousands of claims, this adds up to hundreds of millions saved for Allstate.


Another tactic Allstate uses is to pressure policyholders who are in a financial bind into accepting a quick payment that’s far less than what they need to make them whole. It forces policyholders to file needless, expensive, and time consuming lawsuits as the only way to get what they need to fully restore them to where they were before the loss. Again, Allstate found that most people will not bother to go through the hassle of hiring a lawyer and filing a lawsuit. More money saved for Allstate.


Mr. Bernadelli found that Allstate repeatedly violated the important principles which are necessary to protect people who purchase insurance. Yet Allstate continues to get away with its tactics. Allstate continues to put its own financial interests ahead of their insured’s needs, and now the system is no longer fair. The playing field is no longer level and an insured either accepts less than they receive or seeks legal counsel to level the field.





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Just a little bit more.

Ed



Enlarge image
Hardcover $24.95

From Good Hands to Boxing Gloves

The Dark Side of Insurance

David Berardinelli, JD

Hardcover, 150 pages




Description

It's the story the insurance industry doesn't want you to know. Now, for the first time, the story covered in the legal edition of From Good Hands to Boxing Gloves is available to the public. Find out for yourself why insurance companies are improperly denying and delaying claims, then defending their behavior at trial. The book takes you from the ideas arising from the masterminds behind the Enron business model, through their impact on the insurance industry, and the resulting claim denials in everything from minor auto accidents to Hurricane Katrina claims.

Author David Berardinelli is the trial lawyer who diligently worked to become the first to obtain the McKinsey Documents unprotected. In this book, he discusses how these documents teach insurers to profit by denying or delaying claim payments. Learn how Allstate changed from dealing with policyholders with "Good Hands" to "Boxing Gloves" Discover how this has led to the highest profits in insurance company history during years with our country's largest natural disasters.

Media Coverage

11/07/2007 — Louisiana Attorney General bases anti trust lawsuit against Allstate, State Farm, McKinsey and others on information revealed in From Good Hands to Boxing Gloves Read Story
11/06/2007 — See Allstate director's response to From Good Hands to Boxing Gloves author's charge of putting profits ahead of policyholders—and the facts that discredit Allstate's answers. Watch Part 1 | Part 2
09/28/2007 — Houston Chronicle praises David Berardinelli Read Story
08/22/2007 — New Orleans' The Times-Picayune interviews David Berardinelli Read Story
08/17/2007 — PBS' series NOW features David Berardinelli Read Story, Watch Video
08/03/2007 — Bloomberg.com interviews David Berardinelli Read Story
03/15/2007 — CNN Money Magazine features David Berardinelli Read Story
05/01/2006 — Business Week interviews David Berardinelli Read Story

Reviews

"This book delves deep into the dark heart of the profit-boosting strategies that 'efficiency' consulting firm McKinsey & Company cooked up with Allstate, and the dramatic negative impact they have had on policyholders. McKinsey specializes in redesigning product delivery systems for Fortune 100 companies to maximize profits. It created a plan for Allstate's claims operations known as the Claims Core Process Redesign or CCPR. According to the authors, 'Since its implementation in 1995, CCPR has been the most controversial, and profitable, claim handling system in insurance industry history. To date, CCPR has generated between $15 to $25 billion in excess profits for Allstate's stockholders. It has also generated a national firestorm of bad faith litigation.'

"This estimate is based on Allstate's annual statements showing an increase in surplus from $4.5 billion in 1992 before CCPR to a staggering $21.8 billion in 2004 with an additional $14 billion distributed in that time as shareholder dividends. Allstate has consistently refused to state how much extra profit CCPR generated. However, in 2004 Allstate claims its net income rose to a record $3.1 billion, despite four hurricanes in the southeastern United States, due to what it calls 'Superior Claim Management.'"

—United Policyholders

"Allstate Corp., fresh from fending off criticism about its response to policyholders affected by Hurricane Katrina, faces another potential storm, this one from an author [David J. Berardinelli] who claims the insurer is forcing policyholders to accept prompt but lower payouts or risk time-consuming and expensive litigation... The book [tells how and why] the nation's second-largest home and auto insurer treats some policyholders with 'Boxing Gloves' during their time of financial and personal duress, rather than the reassuringly familiar 'Good Hands' highlighted in its advertising."

Chicago Tribune, "Author throws punch at Allstate," May 3, 2006
"In great detail, the slides show how [Allstate] shareholders could profit from the new way of handling claims, according to Berardinelli's notes. Based on public financial reports, Berardinelli estimates that Allstate has made at least $15 billion from CCPR by fighting minor claims, which make up the bulk of payouts."

Lexington Herald-Leader, "Allstate accused of cheating claimants," July 9, 2006

"It's a story Allstate doesn't want told."

BusinessWeek, "In Tough Hands With Allstate," May 1, 2006
"My reaction to reading an advance copy of From Good Hands to Boxing Gloves is WOW!"

—Eugene R. Anderson, whom Business Week called "The Dean of Policyholder's Attorneys"

"Through many years of intense litigation against Allstate, Mr. Berardinelli has captured the essence of Allstate's, and for that matter, the entire insurance claims industry's business practices."

—Lawrence A. Anderson, president of the Montana Trial Lawyers Association

"This book is phenomenal in bringing the wrongdoings of a major company to light. It is about time that the truth be told!"
—Shannon Kmatz, former Allstate adjuster

"Through extraordinary effort, David Berardinelli has accomplished what insurance consumer advocates have been pursuing for a decade. He has uncovered the new corporate blueprint sweeping America that focuses industry on profit over customers. More importantly, he has exposed these principles, masquerading as trade secrets, as the smoking guns behind corporate malfeasance in the mold of Enron."

—Robert J. Hommel, Esq., Scottsdale, Arizona





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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Everytime I go out to a fire/water job Ill have a copy of it handy in case they are clients of Allstate =) hahahaha....
 

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ALLSTATE WHAT A PIECE OF SH*T COMPANY I have my house insured with these a holes, we had a break in last year, they made off with about $3,200 worth of stuff, well Allstate sent me a check to cover the loss, well when it came time to renew our coverage well theu stuck it to me went from $900 a year to $1,500 so I figure this coming year will bring another increase:rolleyes:
I have done Insurance Repair work for 24 years and I have dealt with Allstate they can be a pain in the azz, but if you can show them where they are wrong with their costs they will make it up, but it depends on the Adjustor your dealing with. Godd luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
last quote was on a bathroom + kitchen + dinning room (12x16). Full rehab - major water damage from second floor = 12,850... they said no way ... job only worth quarter of that...

needed demo + structure repair, drywall, sub floor replacement, insulation, moldings, tile, prime/paint. of all the rooms...

I thought I gave them a damn good deal =) COuld do it for less, but im in business to make a living =)
 

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Hello, Kuba:

I have a diversified financial, construction and insurance background, with the last 16 years as both an insurance restoration contractor and indpendent property adjuster for 39 different carriers.

Currently, I am in Florida working an insurance reform package for to save the State and property owners from the insurance nightmare that the Legislature and carriers have placed everyone in.

I am also completing a package tonight on how to bridge the gap between the estimates of regular contractors (those that don't specialize in insurance work) and adjusters.

Let me know if I can help or give any advice to you or anyone else. I am available 24/7.
 

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Hello, Kuba:

I have a diversified financial, construction and insurance background, with the last 16 years as both an insurance restoration contractor and indpendent property adjuster for 39 different carriers.

Currently, I am in Florida working an insurance reform package for to save the State and property owners from the insurance nightmare that the Legislature and carriers have placed everyone in.

I am also completing a package tonight on how to bridge the gap between the estimates of regular contractors (those that don't specialize in insurance work) and adjusters.

Let me know if I can help or give any advice to you or anyone else. I am available 24/7.
Are you referring to an outsourced means of compiling the line item data on their software, such as xactimate, simsol, etc...

Or, regarding a different software or system?

Please explain the concept a bit more in depth if you could.....

It's okay to PM or e-mail me via this board in the user profile to Send Messages.


I already sent you an e-mail too, since you can't PM yet.



Ed



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In Xactimate. I have been using it for 15 years. Sometimes, I try to provide a win-win for both parties when another person needs help in dealing with insurance claims.
 
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