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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Customer had water problem in basement which ruined carpet and left water marks on face of fireplace hearth. Hearth is constructed with 2x4 face covered with 1/4" luan which was glued to studs with liquid nail, top of hearth covered with stone of some type 1/2"+ thick.
Any advice to remove liquid nail and any remaining luan from the studs. My first attempt was going to be with angle grinder and 40 grit flapper wheel.
New face to be 2 layers of 1/4" drywall wrapped on the studs.
Thanks for any help!
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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Yep, you could spend an entire day trying to clean those up and they still wouldn't be at all smooth. Demo and rebuild.
 

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Pro
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jlsconstruction said:
Should have left it an rocked over it
Then you may have an "overhang" problem with the top above, unless you flat tape it.

Eh, that base needs something more than painted drywall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Considered removing the studs and replacing, but concerned about damage that could occur to the top stone on hearth
 

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The Ultimate Wire Hider
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Use an angle grinder or one of those vibrating multi-tools that they use to pull up tile and cut the bottom of door frames.
 

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Punching above his weight
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Considered removing the studs and replacing, but concerned about damage that could occur to the top stone on hearth
Honestly, you're just as likely to damage the stone with any other method of removing that stuff. The angle grinder method will take you forever. An oscillating tool will take you forever and if you hit a weak patch of glue anywhere near that tile you're going to shoot right up into it. Chiseling it would be a nightmare.

Use a sawzall with a fine blade and be gentle. Test in an inconspicuous area. hah
 

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Love me some Concrete
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Just replace them one at a time.
Honestly, you're just as likely to damage the stone with any other method of removing that stuff. The angle grinder method will take you forever. An oscillating tool will take you forever and if you hit a weak patch of glue anywhere near that tile you're going to shoot right up into it. Chiseling it would be a nightmare.

Use a sawzall with a fine blade and be gentle. Test in an inconspicuous area. hah
Agree with both, gentle as you can be and 1 at a time.
 

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Rob
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Maybe an electric planer... You could get it close enough with that and could probably do it in a half hour or so.
 

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"Replace one at a time"....maybe, but how to install? I'd probably crack the top somewhere by the time it was done. Sure, maybe cut 'em a hair short and snug them in place with shims, but who wants to do that?

I'd start with a flap disc, multi-tool, belt sander - all that stuff. As long as there are no high spots, your fine with some newly-applied liquid nail (Just don't take this job a second time).
 

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"Replace one at a time"....maybe, but how to install? I'd probably crack the top somewhere by the time it was done. Sure, maybe cut 'em a hair short and snug them in place with shims, but who wants to do that?

I'd start with a flap disc, multi-tool, belt sander - all that stuff. As long as there are no high spots, your fine with some newly-applied liquid nail (Just don't take this job a second time).
By the time you did all that, I would have replaced all of those studs. No need to shim to get snug. If the stone broke that easy, it would already be broken.
 

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stacker of sticks
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I can't see it taking more than an hour to replace the studs, cut the old ones with a circular saw not a sawzall, cut the new stud and put it in, I'd use screws so you're not shooting nails into it
 

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I can't see it taking more than an hour to replace the studs, cut the old ones with a circular saw not a sawzall, cut the new stud and put it in, I'd use screws so you're not shooting nails into it
Circular saw with nails?

Anyway, this is one of those jobs you just have to get at, not think too much.
 

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Circular saw with nails?

Anyway, this is one of those jobs you just have to get at, not think too much.
Circular saw to cut in the middle of the stud for less vibration. That would be the safest way to remove if you were worried about breaking the top.

Ultra safe for the top although not the safest thing to do would be make 2 cuts, slide out the center and pry the top and bottom off
 
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