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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all. I would like to get some ideas on how best to proceed. I have an older (72) concrete block home and need to create an opening for new doors approx middle of structure and will consume an existing 54" wide window.
I have a poured bonding beam at the top of the wall (which is 8' tall) all the way around the structure and will need to remove the blocks all the way to the bottom of the bonding beam to fit the 80" doors.
Should I put a steel angle (lintle) under the bond beam extending into undisturbed block?
What size of angle iron would be appropriate?
Do I need to pour the sides of the opening solid concrete?
Thank you all for the input
 

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Chief outhouse engineer
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I think your on the right track. The bond beam is plenty strong, but it is not designed to carry a span so a couple of angles will do the job.

It would be good to fill the cores next to the door, good luck with that, but it can be done.

As a GC I would expect you to know someone who would give you better advice than the internet.. just sayin:whistling
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
new to this area and block walls in general.I worked out west where everthing was stick built. I know I need a lintel but wondering what size would be a bit over engineered? Of course I know about hiring an engineer but I would rather get practical advice on size rather than a severly overestimated one to cover liability.
 

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new to this area and block walls in general.I worked out west where everthing was stick built. I know I need a lintel but wondering what size would be a bit over engineered? Of course I know about hiring an engineer but I would rather get practical advice on size rather than a severly overestimated one to cover liability.
To summarize: you'd like someone with plenty of experience, probably with a license and a reputation, but not with an engineering license (because we're contractors here, not engineers), to give you structural guidance. You'd like the result to be "strong enough" (practical), but not as strong as an engineer would suggest ("severely overestimated").

I am definitely not your man.

I think you're underestimating engineers. Most of them are very practical people, very focused on cost, whether they're designing a bridge or a header. I think you're also over-estimating the difference in the cost between a properly engineered solution and a hack job. Assuming that you're doing the work yourself (so labor is free, whatever that means), the difference in materials costs between a hack job and a professionally designed solution might not be that great. And if the angles are a good idea, and the difference is between smaller and larger, the cost difference should be insignificant.

Let's say that part of the situation is that the work will be un-permitted. Well, get the engineering done properly, then it's on you whether you go and pull the permits.

That's my best advice, friend.

- Bob
 

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No one hates you for asking a question.

People get frustrated when you do not like the answers you get.

The correct & professional way to do this is consult an Engineer.

If you do not like that approach, just get what ever you want to use & be done with it.

TOPIC CLOSED.
 
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