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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My cabinets are made from veneered plywood. The doors I believe are stained and glazed or some type of protective coat on it. They are made from real wood as I can see the different pieces they used in the glue up. They are glossy with a lot of detail. Here's a pic of a similar style. Mine have slightly more detail.



I also have crown moulding that is also very detailed.

How should I go about this? I don't have much experience with paint. I was planning on sanding lightly with 220 grit. Wiping down with wet rag and tack cloth. Priming then painting.

But should I go with a roller and brush? Or rent/buy a sprayer? I want a professional finish. I hate when you can see brush strokes or roller marks on it. Not sure if this is from inexperience painters, cheap equipment, or a combination of both.

Thanks in advance
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm not here just to diy and save money. I'm here to learn. And I gotta learn on something. And these cabinets are my own to learn on.

So going back...any advice or tips that can help me do a good job? Is spraying or rolling/brushing the norm? I'm guessing it's preference, but thought I'd ask the pros here.
 

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For prep, you want them clean, dry and dull.
Can you remove them and paint them laying flat?
I suggest using an oil primer as it is more forgiving about quality of prep, it will stick to whatever finish is on there now, and it is easier to sand.

Brush on oil primer ( I like using SW Problock) and let dry, then light sanding and vacuum.
Brush on SW Proclassic paint. Proclassic is a strange paint to work with. It is self leveling that is why you want cabinets laying flat. Proclassic is a latex enamel paint, very durable.

When door is drying you will be tempted to keep brushing out places you think you missed, leave it alone to dry it will look horrible drying and great once dry. You will need two coats of finish over the primer.

Obviously spraying is quicker and gives a great smooth finish but you can get a good finish with a brush, buy a really good quality brush, use Proclassic paint for your finish.

Don't be tempted to use a roller, results are never as good. For the cabinet frames use same procedure.

What color are you going to finish them? Lots of people going with black these days.
 

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I'm not here just to diy and save money. I'm here to learn. And I gotta learn on something. And these cabinets are my own to learn on.

So going back...any advice or tips that can help me do a good job? Is spraying or rolling/brushing the norm? I'm guessing it's preference, but thought I'd ask the pros here.
Go here:
http://www.diychatroom.com/

That's where the picture you posted came from. Many of the same guys from CT also contribute there.

You will be treated with respect, you will learn from professionals - you will get there what you seek here.
 

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For prep, you want them clean, dry and dull.
Can you remove them and paint them laying flat?
I suggest using an oil primer as it is more forgiving about quality of prep, it will stick to whatever finish is on there now, and it is easier to sand.

Brush on oil primer ( I like using SW Problock) and let dry, then light sanding and vacuum.
Brush on SW Proclassic paint. Proclassic is a strange paint to work with. It is self leveling that is why you want cabinets laying flat. Proclassic is a latex enamel paint, very durable.

When door is drying you will be tempted to keep brushing out places you think you missed, leave it alone to dry it will look horrible drying and great once dry. You will need two coats of finish over the primer.

Obviously spraying is quicker and gives a great smooth finish but you can get a good finish with a brush, buy a really good quality brush, use Proclassic paint for your finish.

Don't be tempted to use a roller, results are never as good. For the cabinet frames use same procedure.

What color are you going to finish them? Lots of people going with black these days.
Which ProClassic? there are 2. Why in the world did they name 2 different paints the same thing?

The refinishers that I do work for wipe the cabinets with something to get the wax/dirt off, quickly scuff the flats and then use liquid sandpaper on the detailed areas.
Oil prime and then BM Advance.

They are very quick about it too
 

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For prep, you want them clean, dry and dull.
Can you remove them and paint them laying flat?
I suggest using an oil primer as it is more forgiving about quality of prep, it will stick to whatever finish is on there now, and it is easier to sand.

Brush on oil primer ( I like using SW Problock) and let dry, then light sanding and vacuum.
Brush on SW Proclassic paint. Proclassic is a strange paint to work with. It is self leveling that is why you want cabinets laying flat. Proclassic is a latex enamel paint, very durable.

When door is drying you will be tempted to keep brushing out places you think you missed, leave it alone to dry it will look horrible drying and great once dry. You will need two coats of finish over the primer.

Obviously spraying is quicker and gives a great smooth finish but you can get a good finish with a brush, buy a really good quality brush, use Proclassic paint for your finish.

Don't be tempted to use a roller, results are never as good. For the cabinet frames use same procedure.

What color are you going to finish them? Lots of people going with black these days.
:thumbup: What a great response!
 

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Why would you want to take a nicely finished cabinet/door and brush a finish on them.

Likely the finish is a primer with a glaze and then a conversion varnish for the final coat. It's a labor intensive process using many different techniques.

If you want a pro finish on the cabs you'll have to spray them. If you want that brushed on look, obviously you need to brush them.

If you are brushing you'll need to use an enamel. Best would be an alkyd enamel, but they're getting hard to find.

You'll need to clean everything with TSP and then use 320 grit or some sort of a scotchbrite pad to degloss the surface. Everything needs to be scuffed up.

I would suggest a good high build primer, scuff sand between coats and then apply 2 coats of the paint, scuffing between coats also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks Ohio painter. I can paint them flat. I'm going to paint them white. They are a brownish color with a tiny if red right now. I have one cabinet in the bathroom, so I'll do that one first to see how it comes out.


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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks Leo G. I've been living in my house for over 5 years and the color of the cabinets throws of the decor. Never cared for the color either. So we're going with white. And I need to learn painting techniques so it's a win win.

I'm going to brush the ones in the bathroom and see how it finishes. If not too good I may be renting a sprayer.


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Trim gets brushed (actually I like sprayed trim too), cabinets get sprayed. Do you have a bigger compressor?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
SmallTownGuy, I'll check out that forum. Thanks.

Overanalyze, I don't have a compressor at all! I've been putting off buying one for the longest time, but I've been looking. You recommend air sprayer vs airless? Im not someone who will be painting all the time, but will be here and there. Not trying to open q can of worms with air vs airless.


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I have both but prefer an air HVLP gun. I am not a regular cabinet finisher like Leo or others here so take that with a grain of salt. It works for the projects I do and I have a large 80 gallon shop comoressor so air is no problem. Spraying fine finish with an airless takes the right gun, tip, and practice.

A true HVLP setup from Fuji or similar companies get excellent ratings as well.

You will get ok results brushing ProClassic but it won't be close to the finish quality they have currently.

If it is something you want to start to do and offer that service to your clients wouldn't it be better to invest in some of the equipment you need to do that vs. using just an ok method?
 

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Clean them with a strong solution of TSP and water, there are alternatives to TSP but that's what I use. Rinse and if you suspect wax then you will need to remove that with liquid sand paper or lacquer thinners.

Ohio has a good schedule a few things I will add. As he said Pro Classic is a little funky especially the hybrid, once down and starting to set you can no longer play with it. You might want to consider the Bejamin Moore Advance, nice leveling characteristics as well as open time. It however doesn't cover as well and is thinner so there is more tendency to run and sag. I would also do the backs first, two reasons. It gives you a feel for what your working with and if any sags occur at the edges you can deal with them when you do the fronts.

All that said spraying will get the best results.
 

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Which ProClassic? there are 2. Why in the world did they name 2 different paints the same thing?

Actually there are three types of Proclassic. There is the good old oil finish which is only sold in quarts here.
Latex finish and the Acrylic Alkyd (hybrid) finish.

They claim the hybrid finish will stick directly to oil paint, but I don't trust it and always put on an oil primer.

For very small projects I will still buy the oil.

I also agree with the others TSP is a great cleaner.

Just to clarify I agree that spraying give a far superior finish and is efficient, but don't rule out the great results that can be done with a brush, patience and the right paint.
 
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