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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thought you might like to know what is happening in the online world so maybe when you plan to do some time of advertising you will know what the trend is...

Advertisers – especially the Small and Medium-Size Businesses (SMBs) are glomming to search advertising.
The harsh economic environment has caused them to re-evaluate longstanding practices of relying on Yellow Pages, newspapers, radio and Direct Mail to reach consumers.


Over the next five years, their ad spending on these four legacy media alone are forecast to fall 19%, representing average annual declines of $3.4 billion.
Meanwhile, spending on paid search by local advertisers is forecast to rise 39%, representing average annual increases of $242 million.


The problem is, the quick emergence of the multibillion-dollar paid-search industry has spawned unrealistic expectations among local businesses eager to turn the Web into a cash register – and a cottage industry of companies eager to bolster that dream.
SEM has no doubt been oversold and mismanaged by resellers, leaving many local businesses disillusioned with a product that holds so much promise. Churn rates are embarrassing for these resellers.
Most of them lose half their customers within a year’s time. Some lose as much as 90 percent.


Approximately two-fifths of all small businesses still don’t have a Web site, and the forecast growth in search-engine marketing by this sector is expected to be 39% over the next four years.

Where do consumers turn first to find a
local business?

According to a recent Nielsen Online survey, 50% of consumers
surveyed said they turn to search engines to find a local business,
followed by yellow pages directories at 24%, Internet-based
yellow pages directories at 10%, local newspapers at 4%, and
white pages directories at 3%.

The survey found that consumers use search engines 72%
more than they did two years ago, when a similar survey was
conducted.
Source: Nielsen Online/WebVisible survey, Feb. 2009

What Makes a Successful Local Advertising Program?

Technology is obviously critical to success, because it is
what differentiates players in this market. SEM depends
on being able to offer advertisers access to multiple search
engines, along with conversion tracking and dashboards
or similar comparative ad management tools.

But technical prowess is no guarantee of success. According
to Kim Peters, CEO of the recruitment search engine Eluta
and a former head of Workopolis and Working.com, SEM
businesses face a key barrier to success: lack of education
within the community of potential customers.

What this means in practical terms, she says, is that while there is value
in these services, resellers are dealing with small businesses
with little or no expertise in marketing, and no one really
responsible for ad budgets.

What Peters believes these smaller businesses need is to try
search engine marketing, and hopefully find that it works,
before moving on to optimize their investment and increase
their spending levels.

Addressing Churn

There are two fundamental barriers to making money from
SEM from the high-growth smaller business sector: typical
ad spends are low, and customer churn is high.

For instance, one major
reseller says its average churn rate is 35-40%; this breaks
down across its affiliate reseller groups as follows:

• Yellow Pages 35%

• Newspapers 20-25%

• Small Business Aggregate 50%+

• Small Businesses 30-35%

As we’ve identified, despite the excitement and growth in
the SEM industry, churn is the elephant in the room.
Though
we may dissect the instigators of churn – less money devoted
to keyword buys, poor or unquantifiable results for advertisers,
greed by the affiliates or resellers – the single biggest
issue is the sales approach.

Are reps selling (and many of them are) a “bucket of clicks,” or are they selling an advertising package that includes various media aimed at generating leads?

As one affiliate told us, a reseller/platform provider pitched the viability of its SEM program by claiming, “You can pocket 50% of the margins!”

Key questions for affiliate marketers, then, might be:

• Does the SEM platform have us selling traffic, or
conversions?

• Does a white-label program offer room to align the goals
of the business with the performance of the product?

• Can the platform deliver a way to optimize the performance
of the advertiser’s keywords?

Conclusion:

This is a study I found onlineby Borrell Associates and it was about 18 pages long, I pulled out things I thought might be interesting to the small business owners on this forum, if you have any questions post here or email me and I would be happy to answer what I know.

Hope this helps.

Darren :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Spam???

I'm sorry if your ADD does not allow you to read more than one sentence or that all you need someone to explain the big words to you. Just because you don't understand something does not make it spam. :wallbash:

I put this up because it is good information for you in reference to YOUR advertising and I thought that maybe it might save you hard earned money in the future when you figure out that being online is the best and most cost effective way to reach your next customer.

As for the link it makes you signup on the website it is published on so I chose to post it in part as it might be seen as advertising, but would be happy to forward the entire thing. Ultimately it turns into a marketing piece in closing but their research is sound, to the open ear.

:w00t:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You have not heard of my site because it is new and currently getting indexed by google so see me in a month, as for chugging the Kool-aid...you mean the internet? advertising? or what exactly are you saying that you don't agree with and is all or in part? :confused1:
Why is when people give you solid advertising information that they usually get hundreds of dollars for you instantly shrug it off as spam?

Did you start this topic?

What is your definition of spam?

Since I started this post and did not post on your topic it is not considered spam, on the contrary your post could be construed as spam.

:shifty:
 

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DQSpec, tough it out. These fools here are just looking for fresh meat. HOWEVER, when someone posts a cut and paste, says ask me for more info, but has nothing in there to indicate what HE or SHE has done with the info, it immediately becomes suspect.

Your posts have all been a mix of mostly pasted info and some personal comment. If you are truly a web guy, throw out something we all can maybe use but not a cut and paste article. Speak from the heart, your experience, or a mouth full of bullshiite but say something from you that others may learn from.

We, in turn, promise to only crack on those we think will fold after one or two posts. Nut it up, hang in there, and in time you will be on the other side of the posts. :thumbup:
 

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"According to a recent Nielsen Online survey, 50% of consumers
surveyed said they turn to search engines to find a local business,
followed by yellow pages directories at 24%, Internet-based
yellow pages directories at 10%, local newspapers at 4%, and
white pages directories at 3%.

The survey found that consumers use search engines 72%
more than they did two years ago, when a similar survey was
conducted.
Source: Nielsen Online/WebVisible survey, Feb. 2009"

I found this part interesting as something I've experienced and suspected. Results from expensive Yellow Page advertising are diminishing, search engine results are increasing and internet Yellow Pages are almost worthless, IMO.
 

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One of the more prolific Google Ads is Webvisible and they have that information on their site in full I think.

http://www.webvisible.com/press.asp?ID=27

For the full download, sign up here:
http://www.webvisible.com/thegreatdivide/


http://www.marketingcharts.com/interactive/%E2%80%98great-divide%E2%80%99-separates-small-biz-online-consumers-7612/
Tools for Finding Local Business
The survey found that search engines, by a large margin, are the most popular source for finding local information.

The list of top sources for local information:

  • 82% use search engines (such as Google, Yahoo, or MSN).
  • 57% use Yellow Pages directories.
  • 53% use local newspapers.
  • 49% use Internet Yellow Pages (such as yellowpages.com or superpages.com)
  • 49% use TV.
  • 38% use direct mail.
  • 32% White Pages directories
Of those surveyed, 50% said search engines (such as Google, Yahoo, or MSN) were the first place they looked when seeking a local business, while 24% chose the Yellow Pages directories.

Ed
 

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It depends so greatly who does the study and if their is blind test samples done and how the questions are phrased for which results any of those studies results to be scrutinized accurately.

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Mike(VA)

Thanks I am just trying to give some info, when I have given advice in here I have gotten flagged and deleted for advertising.

Whatever, if my business was down and my usual forms of getting business were not returning the usual ROI then I think I would listen, look and inquire as to how it is being done successfully.

Don't listen to me or do but don't just type in spam and ruin it for others who might find it useful.

If you have a question on your advertising or your website I would be happy to give advice and tips.

Listen I know it's tough out there right now, I talk to A LOT of contractors nationwide and I can tell you the ones who are still blowing and going are advertising and mostly on the internet or a combination of something that correlates with their website.

:party:
 

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DQSpec, there you go. Just look at the posts above and you will see that there is interest in what you have to say, it is just your delivery that is in question. You say you talk to contractors all over the country, well then you can present an anecdotal summary of how the successful ones are marketing their services from YOUR perspective and observation. You can also share what you have found about those who are not successful. It doesn't have to be, and shouldn't be, one long dissertation but rather short, thread and content relevant pieces that us thick-headed professionals can easily absorb in one sitting.

Everything we all do is marketing. You are doing it here to hopefully get a bit of business. No problem with that just don't come across that way and you'll be fine. Several folks on CT are doing the same as you and have benefited because of their freely-given advise and information. Some of us have opted to use their services so each of us has benefited from the exchange.
 
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