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Has anyone had any success when it comes to getting adjusters to cover bringing decking up to code or the manufactures specifications? Most adjusters act like I'm crazy when I bring it up.
 

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Has anyone had any success when it comes to getting adjusters to cover bringing decking up to code or the manufactures specifications? Most adjusters act like I'm crazy when I bring it up.
They act like you crazy, because they don't wanna pay more than they have too... but you have to do it to meet the code, or you end up paying for it if something should happen.
 

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Where im from in MA. We just call the building inspector and tell them it needs to be decked and they fax as a letter stating it has to be decked to meet code. We do it and bill the ins co. Typically for code upgrades it has to be done and paid for and then they will reimburse upon inspection.
 
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greg24k said:
They act like you crazy, because they don't wanna pay more than they have too... but you have to do it to meet the code, or you end up paying for it if something should happen.
I know, they just act like they have never heard of such a thing.
 

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Where im from in MA. We just call the building inspector and tell them it needs to be decked and they fax as a letter stating it has to be decked to meet code. We do it and bill the ins co. Typically for code upgrades it has to be done and paid for and then they will reimburse upon inspection.

I have had several tell me I needed the inspection department to tell me it needs to be done. In Dallas, they will not take the time to give me such a letter.
 

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I have had several tell me I needed the inspection department to tell me it needs to be done. In Dallas, they will not take the time to give me such a letter.
Print the relative sections of the code.... or just a letter referencing them.

Most insurance companies have either a rider, or an optional policy, that offers "code upgrade" along with the "replacement" options.

First the insurance company will pay the HO the depreciated value of the loss.

For instance, HO losses a 10 square shake roof that is 20 years old.
New value same roof...$5K.

Insurance pays HO $2500 (50% depreciated roof). If HO has "replacement" and replaces, insurance pays for new shake roof..$5K... but code now requires Class A Fireproof.... so insurance has to throw on a Class A comparable to a Class A Shake (pricey).

Bottom line...HO needs to know his policy... and you need to argue code (on his behalf)

(There was so much dissatisfaction with non-replacement and non-code upgrade policies, that many insurers are now incorporating those terms within the policy.... and not as a rider.)

Best
 

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Discussion Starter #9
If a home suffers damage due to a storm and the roof must be replaced, then it also must be brought up to code in the process. I imagine this is covered in a replacement cost policy but I assume every policy is different.
 

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As I am reading this some seem to think that the insurance company should pay for a new deck when the code changes??

Ahh, no.



Obviously I am missing some essential aspect of this thread, could you enlighten me?

Andy.
No Andy... If I'm reading correctly, in the event of an insurance loss (fire/disaster), an adjuster was argueing the insurance company's responsibility as too replacement.

I was just pointing out that if the policy provided "code upgrade" they had to replace as to current code and not as to the value of the loss.
 

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If a home suffers damage due to a storm and the roof must be replaced, then it also must be brought up to code in the process. I imagine this is covered in a replacement cost policy but I assume every policy is different.
Only if the policy provides "code upgrade.... see explanation about three response above.....
 

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I have re-decked several houses, but it's not for code. With spaces measuring 3/8 or more, and over 80% of the decking is spaced that far, it's a "un-nailable surface"
You only have 1"-1.5" of nail strip on a shingle, with large spacing you will land in your gap every few courses.
That's my argument. Best bet, on old houses I always take the adjuster inside to look at the attic if possible.
 

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Whats odd is they beat the crap out of us on the roofing but when it comes to plywood ive never had an adjuster balk at the price.
 

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Whats odd is they beat the crap out of us on the roofing but when it comes to plywood ive never had an adjuster balk at the price.
Yeah on Exactimate's Hrly. Rate, last I looked, They had Roofers well north of $60/hr in my area.

But when you figure in their unit pricing, it's hardly at $40 / hr, unless you are THE Miracle Roofer in a Jar that does 100 squares per hour with 1 hand tied behind your back....:jester:
 

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Yes ....Depending on the insurance company, and the adjuster, it can be a ratty business.... sometimes accidental and I'm guessing sometimes intentional.

Several years ago, my area got hit with severe hail.... and almost everyone had roofing claims.

I ended up reviewing probably 20 adjuster estimates for friends from different companys, and learned chitload.

Alot of my area has cement tile roofs (often lightweight) and there were extensive cracked tile repairs....not reroofs.

My memory may not be exact as to exact pricing, but I believe the allowance for individual tile repairs was about $20/tile.... but some companys when they had multiple (over 100-200) tiles, each still requiring individual replacement, went to reroof pricing at 500-600 per square. (or in essence approximately $5-6 per tile verse $20 per tile replacement.) (Maybe it was $12 for tile replacement.... but the principal was the same).

The insurance companies quickly corrected their estimates to those people who had independent knowledgeable pro's repair the damage.... but to those who chooze not to have the repairs made and keep the check, or used the insurance companies recommended roofers, or used unknowledgeable roofers who decended on the area, no correction was made.

The same type errors/ommisions were prevalent through out other repairs also.

It is advised that someone look over the adjustment estimates closely... and if they can't figure it out.... it is probably very smart to get a pro roofer who knows the game.
 
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