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Addition to a 12 yr old house

4882 Views 35 Replies 12 Participants Last post by  ClemS
This home was built by a large spec builder in the area 12 years ago. (the "Play Slideshow" works in FireFox - let me know if you have trouble with it in any other browser)

The HO want to add a bedroom and bonus room over the garage. I am not too impressed with the framing done on this house. I'm thinking that the builder was trying to maximize every cent of profit. I can see how saving a bit here and there over 500 units can really add up...but I hate to see business compete for the bottom feeders. I like to see a good salesman sell the VALUE of spending the right amount on a home. I will keep a running log of this project.

Issue 1: Studs = 16" oc (fine); 3/8" Plywood web I-Joists - 19.2" oc (pain for stuff getting in the way vertically); Trusses = 24" oc (normal) My new addition is all 16" oc.

Issue 2: To save 5 or 6 sheets of OSB wall sheathing, they hung the attic gable truss out 1/2" over framing (flush with the sheathing below) and then wrapped the whole thing with Typar.



Issue 3: The master bdrm (2) 2-6 5-0 was nailed to the RO with only 4 nails that were placed at the middle of each edge. The corners were flared out 1/8" to 3/16" and never were set into the bead of hard old caulk. (say that loud)
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I personaly see no issue with leaving a truss gable end unsheathed. As long as the truss does not need the osb for shear, what exactly is the downside?
That gable is just plain wrong........:blink:
:eek: Don't need a stiffback either..................
I personaly see no issue with leaving a truss gable end unsheathed. As long as the truss does not need the osb for shear, what exactly is the downside?
I'll see your :eek: and raise you a :eek:. Explain to me logically why sheathing a gabled end truss is better than not (therefore saving 6 sheets of osb and 15-30min of time).
:eek: Don't need a stiffback either..................
Well..I have always done it this way for one. (kinda lame excuse)

But actually, my neighbor's house is fully sheathed and it has saved him from receiving nice round golf ball sized holes in his Hardie siding. (we are backed up to a par 5 (hole #3). From the tee we are on the left side of the fairway...so I don't know if it's righties or lefties who are slicing.

With no sheathing - bamm...hole.:w00t:

Every building I have every built from actual plans has shown sheathing all the way up the wall section view. Apartments on down. I try to have my horizontal seams at locations where I am tying two vertical sections together. We have some serious shear and seismic codes now...but I will ask the code dept about the option to not sheathe.

For some reason it just feels "cheap" to me, not to fully encase the structure in plywood. That's just me though.
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Hey Jhark

Post some more details in your profile about where you are...we might be neighbors.

Mike - Lynden
I imagine a nice Nor'easter would create enough positive/negative pressures to remove that Typar and whatever siding may have covered it. No coastal NJ municipality that I'm aware of would let that fly.:thumbsup:
Many of the houses I frame are exactly like you describe. (except the gable end)

16"oc walls
19" oc floor system
24" trusses.


Our floor systems are engineered, so the engineer decides the joist spacing. ( I suppose that is the norm)

what do you mean when you say it's a pain to get things in vertically?
When nothing lines up getting ducts (and everything else) from the 1st floor to the attic becomes a major PIA.
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I have seen that done before . I don't like it ,but..
I don't like Hardi either. Why the two different types of siding above that garage roof?
That gable is just plain wrong........:blink:
I'm surprised you even have Typar. That's the way we built million dollar homes in Seattle all the time. Not saying it was right, builders just wanted it that way. Usually building paper was used underneath. 24" OC's for trusses is (or was) std. with 7/16" OSB (Seattle area)
Maybe..............Strenth ? Also with out a stiffback the gable studs will move. Seen it many times.
I'll see your :eek: and raise you a :eek:. Explain to me logically why sheathing a gabled end truss is better than not (therefore saving 6 sheets of osb and 15-30min of time).
Mike,

We always framed out the gables to be in plane with the sheathing. I didn't like it because I don't like to land fiber cement on the studs.

For us it was because the boss told us to do it that way. A side benefit is that we don't need to get up there and sheathe it off ladders (stick framed roof).

With the forklift platform, its easy, or we just frame the gable wall as a rakewall. Then everything is done.
the more i read this forum the more i'm convinced that most of wood-framed america is framed like ****. and is still being framed like ****.

:whistling

the only one still doing a decent job of it is loneframer with his sheathing interior wall nonsense.
Mike,

We always framed out the gables to be in plane with the sheathing. I didn't like it because I don't like to land fiber cement on the studs.

For us it was because the boss told us to do it that way. A side benefit is that we don't need to get up there and sheathe it off ladders (stick framed roof).

With the forklift platform, its easy, or we just frame the gable wall as a rakewall. Then everything is done.
Wallmax, I am in Enumclaw. Were neighbors in that we both live out in God's country :thumbup:. Most of my jobs are in unincorperated Martin Luther King Co. :censored:. I have never had a problem with the inspectors. I always let the truss guy know that I don't want sheathing on the engineering.

I agree with you about hardie, but I really think the current LP is a better product. It sure seems to lay down better with out face nailing for me.

Uh Oh, first no sheathing and then LP siding, I better duck
Well - it's coming along.

750 SF added to the house. It's a nice and big bonus room. 20 x 24 vaulted 6:12 from 8' plate.


The builder is doing the following for the HO's

New Roof
New Siding
New Azek fascia and trim
New windows
New carpet
New furnace / HVAC

and whatever else I can't remember.
Wow you guys would have a major heart attack here in AZ. Where I am located code says to sheath all exterior walls but gables are not required. We do anyway but I have seen other builders in town skip it. Now in the valley (Phoenix, Mesa, etc) shear is only required on corners and certain strategic points(I'm guessing). It is the craziest thing to see for me. You drive buy these houses, everything is framed, and you can look straight through the house to the other side. :eek::no:
I'm down in Port Orchard, not too far from you. I would rather put up LP than fiber cement, but I priced it out about a month ago and it was more $$ which surprised me.

How's work going for you?
Wallmax, I am in Enumclaw. Were neighbors in that we both live out in God's country :thumbup:. Most of my jobs are in unincorperated Martin Luther King Co. :censored:. I have never had a problem with the inspectors. I always let the truss guy know that I don't want sheathing on the engineering.

I agree with you about hardie, but I really think the current LP is a better product. It sure seems to lay down better with out face nailing for me.

Uh Oh, first no sheathing and then LP siding, I better duck
Staying busy. You?
How's work going for you?
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