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Maker of fine kindling
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6,199 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is an easy trick for a fast and accurate miter.

In this first pic you can see that I scribed the piece for length and moved the mark up on top of the stick.
That plywood ripping is slightly wider than my work piece and will use that in the next pic



Now I cut partially through the plywood and don't let the thing move afterward.



There is my saw kerf to line up my mark with. Just don't spaz out and move the ripping while you line up the work piece.



Then just cut it. Works fast and easy. And if your eye ain't what it used to be, it's a whole lot more accurate. Enjoy.:thumbsup:

 

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Maker of fine kindling
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6,199 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That Omga doesn't have lasers???
My cheap kapex has dual ones. (never liked lasers untill now)

Good tip Gus, sometimes those little things slip right past people.
Next thing ya know you are gunna want a robot to cut stuff for ya.:whistling

Who do you think you are George Jetson?:no:

Where the heck is my jetpack anyway? Thought we would have those by now
 

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I don't get it :huh:

I never have a problem cutting miters though. I find they just take some planning, you go about it differently depending on what you're building.

O.k I get it now, it's so you can see where the blade is going to cut. I use my speed square, but I guess that works.
 

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Artisan Carpentry
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1,985 Posts
Hey Gus,

The method you show is similar to how I use my "auxiliary fence and table set up". You did a nice job of showing how to get very accurate miters. It also has the benefit of being zero clearance, so no "exit wounds." Clean cutting.

Many trim carps use fairly sloppy reveals (3/16" +or- 1/16", so they never dial in the accuracy. Your method does help bring the accuracy of trim carpenters into the tighter tolerances of the cabinet makers... which is where they should be.:thumbup:

Cheers,

Bass
 

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wannabe
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2,283 Posts
Thanks gus:thumbsup:....

I switch between a chop box and a slide on site. I prefer the chop box (smaller, lighter), but it's hard to line up the tooth/mark like I do with the slide....
 

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Maker of fine kindling
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6,199 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hey Gus,

The method you show is similar to how I use my "auxiliary fence and table set up". You did a nice job of showing how to get very accurate miters. It also has the benefit of being zero clearance, so no "exit wounds." Clean cutting.

Many trim carps use fairly sloppy reveals (3/16" +or- 1/16", so they never dial in the accuracy. Your method does help bring the accuracy of trim carpenters into the tighter tolerances of the cabinet makers... which is where they should be.:thumbup:

Thanks Bass,
I was mitering nosing pieces for the counter top in that cnc video. I have been doing things this way for a long time and it dawned on me that there would be some guys that would benefit from this simple technique. The back up on the cut is a good thing too.

No big deal but it sure does help when your eyes are shot and you can't afford one of those fancy ass green saws with the laser guided blade.:whistling

Cheers,

Bass
I would end up making a bunch of 'Chrome Naked Lady's' out of Azek if I had a CNC!!:laughing:
Nice:thumbup:
Send me the dxf and I'll cut your prototype.
If that is out of your reach then just pose like those chicks on the mud flaps and have your wife snap the shot. I'll take it from there.:thumbsup:
 

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Hey Gus,

The method you show is similar to how I use my "auxiliary fence and table set up". You did a nice job of showing how to get very accurate miters. It also has the benefit of being zero clearance, so no "exit wounds." Clean cutting.

Many trim carps use fairly sloppy reveals (3/16" +or- 1/16", so they never dial in the accuracy. Your method does help bring the accuracy of trim carpenters into the tighter tolerances of the cabinet makers... which is where they should be.:thumbup:

Cheers,

Bass
I use the 16th all the time. My eyes can't take all those little lines anymore:mad: As long as I'm doing my own cutting which is 99.9% of the time it doesn't create a problem. I'm a pretty good judge of where the 32ths are supposed to be:thumbsup:

Only problem that I'm having is 12" blade has too much deflection on the angle cuts unless I use a heavy blade...thinking about dropping to a 10" for the finer work.
 

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I do the same thing but put a couple drops of 2P10 with accelerator to the rip to hold it in place on the fence. Works great if you're cutting mass miters of small molding for raised panels etc. on a 12" saw with a wide fence gap. No more chips flying at you. When you're done, tap the scrap rip with a hammer and it comes off with minimal residue.:thumbup:
 

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Moderator
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Old eyes? I had to put on my glasses to see the pictures. What are these old eyes you're talking about?
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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Been doing it for over a decade. Still a great idea.
 
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