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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
i will do a remodeling in this case i have to deal with 20 doors, what is good to do spray all doors or brush all doors, i never use a spray before so for me what kind of machine do i need to buy, i do not do a lot of painting but some times. please let your wisdon roll. always thank you very much.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
about doors

doors are not new someone painted before with a 1/2 nap roll, i will try to do better for my client, where did you started painting with spray? sometimes we have to start somewhere alone the line and make mistakes because we are not perfect yet, like a teacher told us in the tiling school, the moment you say cant be done then you are finish. but i really thank you for your advise.
 

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...jammin
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izote61 said:
i will do a remodeling in this case i have to deal with 20 doors, ... i never use a spray before so for me what kind of machine do i need to buy, i do not do a lot of painting but some times.
Definately not worth buying a machine for one job
Not worth it at all
If they are already rolled, roll them again with a good quality paint
 

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If they are rolled and have a stipple texture on them from the roller, it really won't matter how you do it. I still don't think you should practice on someone else's doors your first time out. I learned to spray by watching someone else as a helper for a long time and practicing on scrap wood/drywall etc.

The point is, if you've never sprayed before you could ruin a door with the first squeeze of the trigger. I'm not saying don't learn. I'm only saying don't learn on someone's else's stuff. Controlling the flow, overspray, etc takes time to learn. Practice so you can be confident your customers will get a professional result.

I'm with slick though....maybe since they are rolled allready, you can use a foam nap roller to do them again. You'll still be able to fly through them quickly, and you'll get a pretty smooth coat. Good luck whatever you decide.
 

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Hey, don't have an attitude about it. If you worked for me, or with me and wanted to do what you have mentioned you would get the same response. I am willing to bet you'll get that same response from not only me, but every other painter worth his salt, and more than likely the person who the project belongs to.

I wasn't trying to be all high and mighty as you infer. I am in no way trying to belittle you or anything of the sort. I am only trying to caution you against ruining your clients work due to lack of experience. To suggest you practice before touching a piece of finish work is only intelligent. I'm sure your customer would even agree.....sheesh.

Good luck man, spray it to death!
 

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...jammin
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I think that's just him
I don't think he was implying anything
 

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I learned to spray on a barn roof job, but as AA said, I had watched a seasoned veteran many times before attempting it myself on a clients property. This particular job was a metal roof on a barn that sat out by itself, just used for hay storage. From the nearest road it looks great and even from the ground doesn't look too bad, but if you get up on the roof you will see a couple of runs where I shot too heavy in some areas. You can watch all you want, but until you do it yourself you won't really get the hang of it.
 
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