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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As mentioned in an earlier post, my primary job is low voltage installations, but I am currently remodeling my home and handling rewiring a lot of the electrical into a more organized, clean, and (current) code compliant manner.

To that end, I have a couple questions on the NEC code that I am hoping some clarification / confirmation on.

1. There is an exterior door that swings open against a short wall that is around 3 feet in length. At the end of the 3 ft, there is another 3 ft interior doorway between rooms. Since the wall behind the doorway is over 3 feet, I am guessing that I am stuck adding a receptacle to the wall, correct? There are not any exceptions for walls that doors essentially open against huh? Because of the door opening, I see no situation where the outlet would ever be used, but I also don't see any exceptions to it. Since this is a remodel and there is no outlet there now, can it not be installed because I am technically not making any changes to that "circuit" or wall section, even though I am running a brand new circuit for the rest of the room?

2. Is it ok to put a hallway receptacle on a bedroom circuit?

3. I have attached a visio of my current plan for the layout of the SABC for he kitchen / dining area. Can anyone see any issues with the current plan or have any suggestions for laying it out in a better way?

4. I have attached a pic of a shallow old work box I found that is 17 cubic inches. I have an interior wall constructed with 2x3 and standard old work boxes are 14 cu inches which would not allow a plug to be installed in it on a 20A circuit (Box fill, 2.25 * 7 [2 device, 2 conductors in, 2 conductors out , 1 ground] = 15.75). Can the "flat, enclosed" portion of the box be placed behind the drywall and still be code compliant of being accessible because of the opening exposed through the drywall for the receptacle?

5. When running a switch loop with 12/3 or 14/3 wire now that a neutral is required at the switch box, is there a particular requirement (or general recommended standard) for which wire supplies the hot to the switch box or is either way used since both black and red are "hot" "color codes"? IE, the old way you sent the hot to the switch box using the white wire in NM cable provided it was taped black at both ends and the black HAD to be used to return the power to the fixture. With 3 wire cable does it matter which cable sends power to the fixture? I intend to use the red to supply the switch and the black to the fixture, but I was just curious if there was any established rule regarding this.

I appreciate the time to quickly answer these questions.
 

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Where are you located? The AHJ may have their code amendments on line. They may not require the receptacle behind the door. I'd check with the AHJ on #1.

#2- yes.

#3- looks fine to me. You don't show a disposal or dishwasher .

#4- never used one, but the math and build says it should work.

#5- have no clue, we do not use NM here.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
1. I am in RI. We have next to no amendments to NEC 2011 which is what we are on. Only real amendments are to meters and multi-dwelling units for the most part. Guess this means that an outlet is required there.

2. Thanks, thought so.

3. There is a dedicated circuit for the disposal / dishwasher. Thinking of combining these into a single 20A circuit. Does NEC 2014 still allow for that as long as there is a disconnecting means (which has been previously interpreted to be an outlet)? Essentially hardwire some flexible cord to the dishwasher and plug both units into a duplex outlet.

4. Thanks, they appeared to be designed exactly for that.

5. still curious as to the general practice on this.
 

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1. I am in RI. We have next to no amendments to NEC 2011 which is what we are on. Only real amendments are to meters and multi-dwelling units for the most part. Guess this means that an outlet is required there.

2. Thanks, thought so.

3. There is a dedicated circuit for the disposal / dishwasher. Thinking of combining these into a single 20A circuit. Does NEC 2014 still allow for that as long as there is a disconnecting means (which has been previously interpreted to be an outlet)? Essentially hardwire some flexible cord to the dishwasher and plug both units into a duplex outlet.

4. Thanks, they appeared to be designed exactly for that.

5. still curious as to the general practice on this.
I'd check with the AHJ, the receptacle on the other side should be able to service that wall. You are allowed to turn corners.

I go single circuit for the dishwasher and disposal. I'll also add the range if it is just a clock and igniter. Don't forget to break the tab off the receptacle to isolate each opening.

I have not seen the 2014 NEC.

I'd did have one inspector tell me I could not use a cord on a dishwasher and run it into the cabinet next to it. He considered the side of the cabinet a wall. I placed the receptacle behind the dishwasher. Long enough cord to slide the unit out to unplug it. Also may violate the in plain site rule.

Tom
 

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#3 - Check your spacing on the wall receptacles. From the sketch it looks like you have a duplex every 6'. Unless you really want that many receptacles you can space duplexes every 12' for wall receptacles.

#5 - No code requirements just personal preference. I like to do power down on black and switch the red.
 

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#3 - Check your spacing on the wall receptacles. From the sketch it looks like you have a duplex every 6'. Unless you really want that many receptacles you can space duplexes every 12' for wall receptacles......
Incorrect. You can't measure 12' to the first recep and go from there. You must have a recep within 6' first, THEN you can go 12'.

The NEC never mentions 12'.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The extra receptacles are there for a combination of desire to have them and to comply with code.

3 of the receptacles on the sketch are switched receptacles for planned lamps in the corner of the rooms. We therefore desire the additional receptacles to have "always on" receptacles available and also to comply with the 6' rule as from what I understand the switched receptacles do not count as receptacles for the 12' rule.

Now that someone brought up turning the corner for the 6' rule which I agree is allowed, I do not believe I need the additional outlet next to the cabinets in the kitchen area (see attached new diagram). I was just so focused on the walls on a room by room basis, I did not consider this.

Also, the existing electrical is the house is wired quite interesting (to me anyway). None of the electrical boxes use wire nuts. The way they wired everything was stripping away a section of the insulation "midwire" is the best I can describe it and twisting all of the midwire copper exposure together. It then appears that they then put some solder on the connection before taping it with electrical tape. I have no idea of the safety and/or if this was ever the "standard", but my issue now is that when working in the box and reconnecting new switches and other devices with wirenuts, a lot of the existing wiring that I intended on reusing would no longer have 6 inches of unsheathed wire available to it in the box after cutting the wire back to the exposed copper portion. What is the proper way to deal with this situation? Are you required to rerun these wires? Can these wires be left short as a result of them being existing work? Are you supposed to pigtail all of those wires to add length? If so, can they be pigtailed in the same wire nut as used to make other connections or must you pigtail it first by itself to "extend the wire" and then use a separate wire nut to make your connections?

I appreciate the assistance and the answers.
 

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The extra receptacles are there for a combination of desire to have them and to comply with code.

3 of the receptacles on the sketch are switched receptacles for planned lamps in the corner of the rooms. We therefore desire the additional receptacles to have "always on" receptacles available and also to comply with the 6' rule as from what I understand the switched receptacles do not count as receptacles for the 12' rule.

Now that someone brought up turning the corner for the 6' rule......
Duplex recepts that have both recepts switched do not count in the 6' rule. Split or half-hot recepts DO.

Turning a corner generally does not 'restart' the 6' rule. Only openings like doors and stairs do, or a transition to a different type of living space.
 

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The amount of time been wasted worrying about installing a couple extra outlets, they could have been in. Besides, you can never have too many.
 

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Incorrect. You can't measure 12' to the first recep and go from there. You must have a recep within 6' first, THEN you can go 12'.

The NEC never mentions 12'.
I never said anything about the starting point. I said spacing 12'.

You are correct, the NEC does not mention 12'.

To be code compliant you would be required to have a receptacle outlet behind the door.
 

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I never said anything about the starting point. I said spacing 12'......
So if you start out measuring 12' to the first recep, you're not in compliance right off the bat.
 

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So if you start out measuring 12' to the first recep, you're not in compliance right off the bat.
Well.... we got a fine linguistic pissin issue going....

but 480 in all honesty, you have to admit that Seelectic did say "spacing", which generally means between two recepticals, and did not address starting points.

Of course, I doubt anyone thinks your explanation is not more complete and helpfull to us. Thanks for the help/education/assistance and more thorough explanation.:thumbsup:

(I'm likely wrong/incomplete, but for simplicity I like to think of a receptical within six feet of everywhere along a wall, realizing that lamp cords can't be expected to go accross traffic paths.)

Just jumping into a bar room squabble where I don't belong

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I just picture reaching any point on the wall with a six foot cord from the receptacle... That's how a sparky explained it to me years ago.
 
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I just picture reaching any point on the wall with a six foot cord from the receptacle... That's how a sparky explained it to me years ago.
This is pretty much how the NEC reads. No space along the wall can be any more that (fill in the feet depending on the room and application) from a receptacle.

If anyone cares to try and read or comprehend the 700 plus page book that changes every three years, which reads like a law tome and refers to other codes in circles, go at it.

Plain and simple. 6' is the rule for most areas in a home. 6' from any doorway and then the rule applies and you can go up to 12' depending on the layout. Substitute 2' for this on kitchen counter tops. In a hallway over 10' in length, one receptacle must be installed.

Trying to translate the code book would take thousands of pages, and when the local amendments come into play, it would add a hundred or so more depending on what they want.

Sorry to be a stick in the mud, but that is what we are saddled with when it comes to electrical codes. It's simply not simple.
 
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