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iam going to do 419 linear feet in my house , what is the right miter saw for me
do i i have to use a coping saw? or there is a miter saw that do all this, please advise me, can i use 2x2 to have something to nail my crown apart from my studs? always thank you very much for any help. :Thumbs:
 

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This topic hasn't come up in a while so here goes.
What you are going to find is that guys (like me) who were taught to miter prefer it. Others were taught to cope and prefer that method. There is no right or wrong, just different methods of accomplishing the same thing.

I notice that today most trim carpenters do not use cleats behind the crown, I do. I rip the cleat to the appropriate angle and fasten it to the studs then fasten the moulding to the cleat. IMHO this is more secure, there are fewer holes to fill and, in most cases, the nail holes are out in the smoother sections where they are easier to finish.

Don't go away, you're going to hear a lot more on this one.
 

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Teetorbilt said:
I notice that today most trim carpenters do not use cleats behind the crown, I do. I rip the cleat to the appropriate angle and fasten it to the studs then fasten the moulding to the cleat. IMHO this is more secure, there are fewer holes to fill and, in most cases, the nail holes are out in the smoother sections where they are easier to finish.
Guys like me dig guys like you. :Thumbs:
 

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Mitering is great for wall's that are almost a perfect 90 degree. Coping is easier when corners are off 5 degree's or more/less from 90. Cleats are a good idea.
I use a ryobi miter but that is bottom of the line and doesn't have a high back fence. With a mod it can. But what ever saw you use buy a finish 40 tooth blade.
 

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izote61 said:
iam going to do 419 linear feet in my house , what is the right miter saw for me
do i i have to use a coping saw? or there is a miter saw that do all this, please advise me, can i use 2x2 to have something to nail my crown apart from my studs? always thank you very much for any help. :Thumbs:
What somebody needs and what they want are usually 2 different things.

I use a compound miter saw and a hand coping saw. I have never used any backing, however I have never put up anything extra large or made from multiple layers of crown. For standard crown I have had no problems with using a stud finder and a pencil, marking the studs lightly on the wall so my nails go into studs. I have never chaulked a line since there are only 2 places that it really matters where the crown ends up, the 2 ends so they line up with the rest, as long as the rest of the crown looks good to the eye it looks good to the eye! I just measure where the crown will come down to on the wall and put 2 pencil marks in the corner so I can line up each piece of crown coming out of the corner. Alex Plus painters caulk and a sponge, and some spackle for the nail holes when I'm done.
 

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The Deck Guy
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Get a 12" CMS so that you can cut most crown "in position".

Also, coping is a lot less forgiving in the corners and, although it's an art, it's not THAT hard to do....practice, practice, practice..

Also, get a Collins Coping Foot (www.collinstool.com). Coping by hand is sooooo slooooow. Right Mike?
 

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That Alex plus (DAP) is crap caulk if you ask me, but nobody asked, so I'll leave it alone, lol! Sorry, I just don't like that runny stuff. I need something with some real body to it that lasts longer than the trim, so I use SW 1100A 55 year caulk. I don't doubt it does ok, I've had to use it a couple times...hence the reason I don't like it, heh!
 

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Alex, hehe. Amature crap. $ 1.49 a tube at the box store. Get real.
 

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For Pete's sake, you're beating up poor Mike because he uses cheap caulk. We all have our faults. If he's getting good results with it, who's smarter than who here?

(I got your back Mike :Thumbs: )
 

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Hey, not a problem guys, I don't know everything and I'm always open to finding something better, if you haven't learned at least that about me, get your heads out of your asses! :)

MD - checks in the mail buddy!

Anyways, I am not happy with Alex Plus, the only complaint I have with it is sometimes as it cures it shrinks and can pinhole and stuff, but I have also found that seems to have a lot to do with how much water is on the sponge when you wipe it.

I have the same issues with C-cure color matched caulks for tile, and C-cure ain't cheap, nor crap no matter what anybody says, I figured part of the problem has got to be the lack of humidity out here.

SW 1100A 55 year caulk - I take it is Sherwin Williams brand? What it cost? Is this the stuff everybody recommends?
 

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I use the Alex Plus too because it's cheaper than most caulks and wipes down smoothly. I've never had issues with shrinking though.

The regular Alex sucks completely for some reason.

I've also tried MD painter's caulk and it sucks. Also, used the Ben Moore caulk and wasn't nuts about it either.

Caulk is the last thing I worry about on a project. It all works more or less and unless it's fending off water in a shower area or outside, I just use what's at my disposal. There are way too many other issues to worry about!
 

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mdshunk said:
For Pete's sake, you're beating up poor Mike because he uses cheap caulk. We all have our faults. If he's getting good results with it, who's smarter than who here?

(I got your back Mike :Thumbs: )
But then again, - - 'good results' are experienced by the customer, through 'time', - - and cheap caulk won't pass that test.

A few more dollars per tube is cheap insurance for one's reputation. :Thumbs:
 

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Ive found daps dynaflex 230 to be the best all around caulk for interior and exterior woodwork and trim,but for tubs, backspashes and similar applications i use a non-silicone adhesive caulk. I also use a 60 to 80 tooth blade in my miter saw,quality brand such as freud will set you back 50 to 90 dollars ,but these blades get resharpened many times,unlike my 71/4 blades which get tossed or used for demo cutting.
 

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Cope it if you are a carpenter.

This method hides imperfections in the wall, but it also prevents an inside miter from opening when the wood changes shape during humidity changes. This will be more prevalent in taller molding profiles.

A coping saw is an easy tool to learn how to use. If you are afraid of a little coping saw, then you should not own a power saw.

Coping can be done with a good variable speed jigsaw too. I have seen a rig that attaches to the molding to provide a bed for the jig saw to ride on. I have not tried this, but have used a jigsaw on larger moldings.
 

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Coping was probably more important in the days of hand nailing trim. Driving a nail with a hammer naturally pushed the inside corners open. Trim has come a long way with guns, modern saws and other tools. I say mitre the inside corners if you can get them to look good. Just make it perfect and then leave it alone. RT.
 

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Oldtimers coping every corner is more myth than reality ive seldom seen it done,a lot of these guys would make a custom miter box for each molding to be cut. This reminds of the myth of oldtimers actually installing diagonal braceing,ive seen a lot of old home framing where the only bracing was the clapboards.
 

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Rob 53 said:
Coping was probably more important in the days of hand nailing trim. Driving a nail with a hammer naturally pushed the inside corners open. Trim has come a long way with guns, modern saws and other tools. I say mitre the inside corners if you can get them to look good. Just make it perfect and then leave it alone. RT.
Any carpenter worth his salt, - - now or then, - - knows not to nail too close to corners, - - with or without a nail gun.

Coping makes a better, longer-lasting corner simply because it divides the unavoidable 'shrinkage' factor exactly in half, - - and even then, - - leaves a 'visual' gap from only one angle, - - instead of both.

Miters will look fine today.

Coping will look fine tomorrow.

You choose.
 

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anyone ever heard of a bevel square??? they work great for those pesky out of square corners. some trim profiles are too much of a PITA for a coping saw-even with a contour gauge.
 

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carpenter1st said:
anyone ever heard of a bevel square??? they work great for those pesky out of square corners. some trim profiles are too much of a PITA for a coping saw-even with a contour gauge.
A contour-guage??, - - umm, - - how long have you been a carpenter??

Maybe it's me, but why would you use a contour-guage??

I've never run into a trim profile that couldn't be coped, - - just follow the old line wherever it goes.
 
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