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They probably didn't have a sweet telehandler to get it to the top of the scaffolding either:no:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
the other thing that i see is the top and bottom of the block are real rough and the mortar hold real well
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
the building is 70 ft long 38 w all concrete floor and there is only one evry small crack in the floor at the sewer pipe. charlie mayo did not go cheap on anything that i have worked on of his doing:no:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
yes think about it block now are 30 or so pound one in each hand and on in his mouth:laughing:
 

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Some of the block from that time period were made on site by the masonry contractor. Block making machines became somewhat popular about about 10 ears later when Sears started selling machines with steel molds.

I saw some mold parts that were thick wooden outsides and steel cores that were pulled out as soon a possible.

The 9" thickness was the reason for some of the strenge bonding and corner details. There always seemed to be a few concret plugs and/or wide head joints.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
i have found the word block and the dat 1903 on the bottom of them but no name yet the owner kept a chunk of motar that had the date and the word block on it
the otherthing that i have seen is the motar come off the block in 10 or 12 inch long strip;)
 

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Hey Dick, Westbrook Block still has the original single block SEARS mold that Paul's father used to make block after working his regular job. In the late 40s I'm guessing. And no forklift or boom truck. All the block were delivered on a flatbed truck and unloaded by hand.
Now they're a multimillion dollar outfit. Just bought a cement plant in Jersey.
 

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Sorry for the hijack, but if anyone is interested in a great American success story, Westbrook Block is it. When I first started in the trade I dealt with the the founder occasionally, Now his son is close to retiring and the grandson is ready to take the helm.
http://www.westbrookblock.com/?page_id=151
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
been hopping to talk with one of the old mason that his dad was a mason back then to see if they were site made or what
 

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pappagor -

Old Charlie and his ancestors might even be interested in buying the house. - I missed the reference to "charlie" and did not put it together with the "mnmayo" on the location.

The Mayo Clinic there in Rochester is known internationally, but fewer 747's from Arabic countries are showing up at the airport. I think they are going to other branches of the clinic is warmer climates. - Amazing place with complete support of the surrounding facilities.

My brother-in-law has been there for about 10 days so fat and the last surgery went from 8:30 AM until 4:00 PM (prep and recovery included). My first wife was a "Mayo" and her father was from Rochester.

Several groups may be interested in getting a block or two as historic samples of construction materials. One is the Besser Company in Alpena, MI (founded in about 1903 and a manufacturer of concrete products manufacturing equipment with customers in about 100 countries) and the National Concrete Masonry Association (NCMA) that is located in Herndon, VA that has significant international membership.

Just a side point -
 

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re-installed some windows and sills on ~1918 drug store ~25'x70' two stories with poured concrete basement. Used 10" CMUS for infill with big bed joints.

Originally molded "rock" faces, stucco sometime in the 40s.. I guess darn close to 2500psi -3000psi compressive strength. Pita for utilities, Much better than the iron cross bar blocks made in the same era that rust away leading to wall failure.

Like the labyrinth cross webbing to raise the "R" value.

"Miracle double staggered air space Block Machine" Miracle concrete company Minneapolis, Minnesota? March 1910 "Building Age" page 106

McClure's ad:

http://books.google.com/books?id=z4... Minneapolis minnesota concrete block&f=false
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
re-installed some windows and sills on ~1918 drug store ~25'x70' two stories with poured concrete basement. Used 10" CMUS for infill with big bed joints.

Originally molded "rock" faces, stucco sometime in the 40s.. I guess darn close to 2500psi -3000psi compressive strength. Pita for utilities, Much better than the iron cross bar blocks made in the same era that rust away leading to wall failure.

Like the labyrinth cross webbing to raise the "R" value.

"Miracle double staggered air space Block Machine" Miracle concrete company Minneapolis, Minnesota? March 1910 "Building Age" page 106

McClure's ad:

http://books.google.com/books?id=z4... Minneapolis minnesota concrete block&f=false
that is what the block is stamped with just was not:thumbsup: able to read it through the motar thank you for the info will pass it onto the owner
 

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I thought that the staggered webs of the block would make it more energy efficient. Interesting that the machine to make them came from Minnesota.

Even a hundred years ago they were looking for energy efficiency.
 
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