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This is a deck that we are building right now on current river. It's going to be 1,536 square feet, and it will have a fire pit built in and a large dock on the water. Check out our Facebook page Barco Construction and Design in Doniphan Missouri
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks! This is a really fun project. We have built one similar in the past. The shape of the deck mimics the shape of a grand piano. This is it right here.
 

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Cool deck(s)! Do you think the framing around the trees will accommodate their growth? I know from building a tree house that I would have framed further away from the limbs/trunks and filled in with bolt-in removable framing to make cutting out of the decking and framing for the trees growth and direction of growth easier. There must be quite a bit of movement that high up when the wind blows. Or maybe it's just the pictures. Again, cool looking decks.
 

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VERY COOL JOB.

On a contstruction standpoint I would be concerned about footings and erosion and the lifting or overturning of the trees with erosion and wind.
 

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All interior support posts are laminated with 3 treated 2"x 6" and 1/2" treated plywood, glued and screwed. This makes a very strong 6" post that won't crack or warp.
Was that approach with the posts provided by a structural engineer? What's the plywood?

Edit: California may be special this way, but a built-up post would require an engineer's stamp. I don't think there's any prescriptive way of doing that.
 

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Artist and not a curator
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Looks good but with all that work why not sell them on a higher end wood? I'd hate to put all that lumber down just to see it check, warp, and twist itself into ruining a job well done.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well we have built several decks with this material on the river and it has not warped and cracked. The deck in the first picture was built in 2001. It has withstood many strong storms and humidity. It's still just as solid as it was when it was built. The client is still very happy with it.
As far as using higher end wood for the decking, this is what the client wanted. We have another deck to build right behind this one for the neighbor. They are wanting more higher end style.
I assure you it is structurally sound. Our company owner and designer for the project started in construction in Los Angeles California. I'm sure you realize California has some of the toughest building codes in the country. There are no requirements for an engineering stamp in the state of Missouri. That's very unfortunate for our state because ANYBODY can call themselves a contractor. We get so many calls to fix work that others have done incorrectly. There are not even licensing requirements for building inspectors. :eek:
We also use a marine grade plywood to protect it from humidity to keep it from buckling.
 

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Thats crazy . But I guess that's what lawyers are for .
I totally agree. Luckily there are a few of us here that actually take pride in what we do. Our area is full of these so called ''contractors'' that just want to slap something together to make a quick profit, and this leaves the homeowner broke and aggravated that they didn't get quality work. But at the same time homeowners should be doing their research into who they hire. We have walked away from several jobs because the client wants the cheapest job possible. We are not the contractor for them. We use the phrase "you get what you pay for." a lot! It gets frustrating. Our work is an art. not just slapping something together.
 

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We also use a marine grade plywood to protect it from humidity to keep it from buckling.
I remain curious. I have some boat-building experience, with marine plywood, and I've never heard of pressure-treated marine ply. In fact, it's a common downfall of amateur boat builders to think that marine ply won't rot. What makes it "marine" is only that the glues won't release, so the ply won't delaminate. But the wood will still rot.

Please enlighten me. My boat-building was 10 years ago, so maybe things have changed.

- Bob
 

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Again....marine grade plywood is built for stress not exposure. The plys have no knots. It will react the same way any plywood will exposed to the weather treated or not. The glue has nothing to do with it. It does not protect itself from moisture.

I am also interested in those posts. How high is that like 50 ' ? and you put them up in one piece ?

Only Mac could have done that :laughing:

JonMon www.deckmastersllc.com
 

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Again....marine grade plywood is built for stress not exposure. The plys have no knots. It will react the same way any plywood will exposed to the weather treated or not. The glue has nothing to do with it. It does not protect itself from moisture.

I am also interested in those posts. How high is that like 50 ' ? and you put them up in one piece ?

Only Mac could have done that :laughing:

JonMon www.deckmastersllc.com
Good ol Mac:thumbsup:.
 
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