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Hello gentlemen
I am a new bi in this forum, let thanks in advance to everyone that will help me with this new challenge in my small biz.
I have a customer that He wants to split a huge warehouse. So, He ask me to build a 35 feet tall and 150 feet long 3 hours fire rated wall.

what will be a reasonable labor price to frame this wall out of 6" metal studs 16g., hang 3 layers of drywall for each side of the wall and fire tape.
 

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That height of a walk is going to be a huge pain for hanging the drywall. Slow going as it requires a lift and offsetting seams. We did a 20' high wall last year and that sucked...can't imagine another 4 rows of board!
 

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To relieve yourself of liability, it would be best to have an Engineer design this wall taking in to account the requested fire rating, the height, length, seismic issues, construction details such as blocking and
anchoring and the building type & intended use.
And then, if the the result of the engineering happened to be the wall in the original post, you can't really figure out the labor without knowing the system - people, equipment, methods - you're going to use to erect the wall and do the sheetrock. It has to be a whole plan, not just some guys and a couple lifts. Are you qualified to do this, safely?
 

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we do these all the time.16g 6" stud is what we use and sometimes 18g 8" stud.
theres alot of variables in a project like this other than putting it together. u should have an engineer put together some blueprints for you. Top track attachment point, and how your top blocking will go from joist to joist, can be more time consuming than framing the wall itself. although u have 16g studs they can still get kinked because of how long they are.
we use the 16' lifts to work these walls. they provide a large amount of workspace. we carry our chopsaw and material up top and work off the lift installing top track. no need to come up and down, waste to much time. a guy in the bottom can shoot down bottom track and shoot u laser marks for top track at the same time, pulling layout as u go. we use this same lift for drywall. it can easily lift 25 sheets. if your framing is dead on u should be able to get 60-80 sheets up a day. 2 guys.
3-4 days for framing unless the plans call for added support or crc chanel.
10 days (+-) for drywall. 2 guys hanging the oppossite side at the same time.will cut time in half. we always stagger our joints from opposite side of the wall. so if we started with a 48" full sheet on this side, the back side we'll start with a 24" rip. staggered but joints at least 2 studs. (32")

its a pretty simple job, but its a big job that requires alot of material and good help.
 

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35' tall is a tall wall. You will need at least a 28'lift. 3 layers of rock each side with seams staggered slows things down. 2 1/2" screws for the 3rd layer slows things down a lot also. Does the top sheets have to be scribed aroung joist and decking? There are multiple variables that only can be priced by looking at themjob conditions.
 

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we do these all the time.16g 6" stud is what we use and sometimes 18g 8" stud.
theres alot of variables in a project like this other than putting it together. u should have an engineer put together some blueprints for you. Top track attachment point, and how your top blocking will go from joist to joist, can be more time consuming than framing the wall itself. although u have 16g studs they can still get kinked because of how long they are.
we use the 16' lifts to work these walls. they provide a large amount of workspace. we carry our chopsaw and material up top and work off the lift installing top track. no need to come up and down, waste to much time. a guy in the bottom can shoot down bottom track and shoot u laser marks for top track at the same time, pulling layout as u go. we use this same lift for drywall. it can easily lift 25 sheets. if your framing is dead on u should be able to get 60-80 sheets up a day. 2 guys.
3-4 days for framing unless the plans call for added support or crc chanel.
10 days (+-) for drywall. 2 guys hanging the oppossite side at the same time.will cut time in half. we always stagger our joints from opposite side of the wall. so if we started with a 48" full sheet on this side, the back side we'll start with a 24" rip. staggered but joints at least 2 studs. (32")

its a pretty simple job, but its a big job that requires alot of material and good help.
That's a nice clear picture - the labor number comes from your system. If you have a system you don't need to ask about the labor number. If you don't have a system then a labor number means nothing.
 

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Hello gentlemen
I am a new bi in this forum, let thanks in advance to everyone that will help me with this new challenge in my small biz.
I have a customer that He wants to split a huge warehouse. So, He ask me to build a 35 feet tall and 150 feet long 3 hours fire rated wall.

what will be a reasonable labor price to frame this wall out of 6" metal studs 16g., hang 3 layers of drywall for each side of the wall and fire tape.
i can't resist, TREE FIDDY :jester:
 
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