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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Sounds like alotoffuctup would be a better user name for you. This, you have accomplished


Mike
Your original question at the top of the thread was what you should do to protect your company. To protect your company you carry insurance. Several people have asked about insurance and you said nothing. I asked you directly if you had insurance… now you’re calling people names like a child.

So here’s one more lame answer for you. If you’re working on a trailer and it catches fire TWICE nobody on the Internet can help you. Call your insurance company. Your policy includes coverage for attorneys and investigators and they are the professionals that will tell you what to do.

Even if you are a licensed general contractor, in many places you still can’t do electrical work but you’ve admitted doing it without telling us that you are a license and insured electrical contractor. But don’t worry, your insurance company may still cover you. Check your policy for coverage against negligence.

Or you can keep clogging up all the construction forms on the Internet thinking someone has an easy magic answer for you that won’t require any work on your part.
You write very well. You made your point about calling names. I stand corrected it was childish and I acted out of line. I hope you will forgive me for my unprovoked attitude.

your assumption of my reasons for reaching out on this forum are incorrect. I was lookin for some advice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Your original question at the top of the thread was what you should do to protect your company. To protect your company you carry insurance. Several people have asked about insurance and you said nothing. I asked you directly if you had insurance… now you’re calling people names like a child.

So here’s one more lame answer for you. If you’re working on a trailer and it catches fire TWICE nobody on the Internet can help you. Call your insurance company. Your policy includes coverage for attorneys and investigators and they are the professionals that will tell you what to do.

Even if you are a licensed general contractor, in many places you still can’t do electrical work but you’ve admitted doing it without telling us that you are a license and insured electrical contractor. But don’t worry, your insurance company may still cover you. Check your policy for coverage against negligence.

Or you can keep clogging up all the construction forms on the Internet thinking someone has an easy magic answer for you that won’t require any work on your part.
Your smoking crack I pulled a plug out of a fan housing and tested it. Fare cry from doing electrical work. Do you want to help me or not? If not do t reply to this post.
 

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Your smoking crack I pulled a plug out of a fan housing and tested it. Fare cry from doing electrical work. Do you want to help me or not? If not do t reply to this post.
Everyone did help you, doesn't matter what you consider electrical work simple fact is you touched it.
 

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You touched it, you own it.
That is not always true, if it was no one would do service work. They would only install new systems. For 10 years I did service work on life safety systems in 3 states, not once did "you touch it you own it" come up because it isn't true. When you left the building you stated what condition the system was in when you left, if something was not working it was noted. I once checked a Fire Alarm at an occupied school where only 1 pull station worked, did the company "own it "?. No other part of the system worked.

No the district superintendent was notified and the fire dept had to have members there whenever school was in session until the system was repaired
 

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If I find an electrical problem, I flip the breaker and tape it, and Mark it do not touch. Then a master electrician fixes it.

How tough is that?
 

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That is not always true, if it was no one would do service work. They would only install new systems. For 10 years I did service work on life safety systems in 3 states, not once did "you touch it you own it" come up because it isn't true. When you left the building you stated what condition the system was in when you left, if something was not working it was noted. I once checked a Fire Alarm at an occupied school where only 1 pull station worked, did the company "own it "?. No other part of the system worked.

No the district superintendent was notified and the fire dept had to have members there whenever school was in session until the system was repaired
In this case there's lack of common sense. The OP is working on a bathroom which a fire started from a fan, while there another bathroom fan stops working. What would you do?
 

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This gets back to an issue one of the sparkies pointed out a long time ago.

Just because you get a good voltage reading, that doesn't mean there isn't a resistive short or open. A good voltage reading doesn't mean the circuit is safe.
 

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In this case there's lack of common sense. The OP is working on a bathroom which a fire started from a fan, while there another bathroom fan stops working. What would you do?
I would say you should have called an electrician instead of a carpenter, let’s turn the breaker off to be safe
 

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That is not always true, if it was no one would do service work. They would only install new systems. For 10 years I did service work on life safety systems in 3 states, not once did "you touch it you own it" come up because it isn't true. When you left the building you stated what condition the system was in when you left, if something was not working it was noted. I once checked a Fire Alarm at an occupied school where only 1 pull station worked, did the company "own it "?. No other part of the system worked.

No the district superintendent was notified and the fire dept had to have members there whenever school was in session until the system was repaired
Insurance companies will disagree with you. If you touched it... AND A FIRE WAS THE RESULT.....


I guarantee you'll be served papers.
 

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Insurance companies will disagree with you. If you touched it... AND A FIRE WAS THE RESULT.....


I guarantee you'll be served papers.
And the main reason for that is that it happened AFTER you touched it AND were aware of an issue with the previous fan... OP "tested it" and the fan wasn't working, meaning he was aware of a potential issue... as HDavis said... turn off the breaker, tape the breaker, inform HO verbally and in writing and get electrician in...
 

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Every contractor who stepped foot in that house will be brought in that does not mean just because you touched something you will be liable. If that were the case no one would do service work. I the previous work I did all that was asked for was the service records of the building. Being served papers has nothing to do with being liable if you did nothing wrong. They are trying to find the cause.
I have been deposed several times without issues
 

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Right being aware of the issue is the problem because I’m court we are considered experts.
in my previous post if I did not document what I found and did not notify the superintendent then I would be screwed not because I touched it
 

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On these "Oh, by the way" issues, if they're outside my scope, I'll tell the HO they need to call a plumber, electrician, whatever. I may do a quick check as a courtesy.
 

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Yes a second fire. Durning hanging Sheetrock the HO said the fan stop working in other bathroom. I checked it with volt tester power was present but fan did not work.
I’ve been thinking about this all day. It took five beers but I figured out what happened!

You were hanging drywall and accidentally hit the fan wire with a screw…you didn’t realize the ‘studs’ in manufactured homes are much smaller than the studs in normal homes.

Maybe you actually hit both fan wires because the bathrooms share a common wall?

Please be sure to let me know if this is a possibility. I know it’s lame of me to spend all day thinking of this but I want to make sure you get your moneys worth out of your membership here on the contractor forum. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Everyone did help you, doesn't matter what you consider electrical work simple fact is you touched it.
I am C
I’ve been thinking about this all day. It took five beers but I figured out what happened!

You were hanging drywall and accidentally hit the fan wire with a screw…you didn’t realize the ‘studs’ in manufactured homes are much smaller than the studs in normal homes.

Maybe you actually hit both fan wires because the bathrooms share a common wall?

Please be sure to let me know if this is a possibility. I know it’s lame of me to spend all day thinking of this but I want to make sure you get your moneys worth out of your membership here on the contractor forum. :)
thank you for your brutal honesty. Where the fire started was a wall adjacent the area where Sheetrock was being hung. The state L &I Inspector had signed off on framing and ok’d project to completion. The Ho had an air conditioner added in the bedroom that was on that circuit I believed it overloaded And caused a fire.
 

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I am C

thank you for your brutal honesty. Where the fire started was a wall adjacent the area where Sheetrock was being hung. The state L &I Inspector had signed off on framing and ok’d project to completion. The Ho had an air conditioner added in the bedroom that was on that circuit I believed it overloaded And caused a fire.
That makes no sense, why didn’t breaker trip?
 
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