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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m currently working on a 1979 manufactured home that was involved in a bathroom fire caused by a bathroom fan. After having the framing inspection okayed are you started hanging sheet rock.

In the adjacent bathroom the fan went out also I checked it with the test light and there was power getting to the fan but the fan was not circulating. They diagnosed it as a faulty fan.

Three days later another electrical fire happened to fire department said that it was caused by electrical.

What should I do?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
What should I do as in protecting my company? Homeowner leads me to believe they are trying to claim I’m at fault.
 

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I own stock in FotoMat!
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Did you touch the fan? If not, the HO can kick rocks. He's just looking for a whipping boy to take the fall (and pay the bill). Turn it over to your insurance and let them handle it.
 
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I’m currently working on a 1979 manufactured home that was involved in a bathroom fire caused by a bathroom fan. After having the framing inspection okayed are you started hanging sheet rock.

In the adjacent bathroom the fan went out also I checked it with the test light and there was power getting to the fan but the fan was not circulating. They diagnosed it as a faulty fan.

Three days later another electrical fire happened to fire department said that it was caused by electrical.

What should I do?
So a 1st fire was started due to a bath fan? You're working on that and a 2nd fire was caused by another fan in a different bathroom? Who is "they" that diagnosed a faulty fan?

Doesn't seem to be any common sense involved.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes a second fire. Durning hanging Sheetrock the HO said the fan stop working in other bathroom. I checked it with volt tester power was present but fan did not work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Did you touch the fan? If not, the HO can kick rocks. He's just looking for a whipping boy to take the fall (and pay the bill). Turn it over to your insurance and let them handle it.
Yes when I tested it after it was brought to my attention that it was not working.
 

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Yes when I tested it after it was brought to my attention that it was not working.
So "they" is you, common sense would have been replace that fan also since the first started a fire at the very least when it stopped working. They were probably identical fans.
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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Sorry to say that if you determined that power was going to that second fan, but left it connected, the land sharks---er, lawyers might be able to make a case against you. If the "electrical cause" of the fire originated in that fan. You haven't told us if that's the case.

Either way, check your insurance coverage. Even if you're covered, how much damage was there? Sometimes, it's better in the long run to eat the expense vs making a claim.
 

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Yes when I tested it after it was brought to my attention that it was not working.
So.... you 'tested' it and found it wasn't working. You should have either fixed it or disconnected it. You touched it, you own it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I left it disconnected and ordered a new fan. It should be here tomorrow.

the fire started in the wall above the light fixture on the wall.
 

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IF you actually have insurance and have nothing to hide, file a police report for insurance fraud against the homeowner. Your insurance company would likely have you do that as a formality anyway. If you actually have insurance.
If you are on the up and up just refuse to talk to anyone “based on the advice of the attorney my insurance company has advising me’.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
IF you actually have insurance and have nothing to hide, file a police report for insurance fraud against the homeowner. Your insurance company would likely have you do that as a formality anyway. If you actually have insurance.
If you are on the up and up just refuse to talk to anyone “based on the advice of the attorney my insurance company has advising me’.
What is it with you keep insinuating that I’m not on the up and up as you put it. I’m a licensed and bond General Contractor. I asked a question on this form expecting answers from professionals. What I received was a few good answers and a lot of answers that only showed the givers intelligence. I will be looking on other forums for people who are currently in the trade rather then talking about it.

so long lame
 

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What is it with you keep insinuating that I’m not on the up and up as you put it. I’m a licensed and bond General Contractor. I asked a question on this form expecting answers from professionals. What I received was a few good answers and a lot of answers that only showed the givers intelligence. I will be looking on other forums for people who are currently in the trade rather then talking about it.

so long lame
Your original question at the top of the thread was what you should do to protect your company. To protect your company you carry insurance. Several people have asked about insurance and you said nothing. I asked you directly if you had insurance… now you’re calling people names like a child.

So here’s one more lame answer for you. If you’re working on a trailer and it catches fire TWICE nobody on the Internet can help you. Call your insurance company. Your policy includes coverage for attorneys and investigators and they are the professionals that will tell you what to do.

Even if you are a licensed general contractor, in many places you still can’t do electrical work but you’ve admitted doing it without telling us that you are a license and insured electrical contractor. But don’t worry, your insurance company may still cover you. Check your policy for coverage against negligence.

Or you can keep clogging up all the construction forms on the Internet thinking someone has an easy magic answer for you that won’t require any work on your part.
 
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