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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am only the electrical sub on this one so it's not one I am the GC on.

This is a whole house remodel, and we're doing the kitchen, master bath, and misc. other things for the GC.

The HO requested a quote for some other work (change orders) denied them since they were too expensive, but has apparently hired another contractor to do these things. (Master closet buildout, basement bath remodel, hall bath remodel, etc.)

My name is on the permit as the electrical contractor and the GC is not yet aware of this, although I just sent him an email.

So....here's the question.

Have any of you ever been in this awkward situation? We're going there to finish the rough Monday and apparently the other contractors will be there to start the other projects. The issue of concern is that it's my name on the permit.

I already know I will call the AHJ to separate myself from the other work, but any other hints/tips.

This is truly a first for me.

:blink:
 

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GC/carpenter
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If he pulled a supplemental permit that's tied to yours it can make you responsible for his work as far as the city is concerned. He wasn't suppose to pull the permit as a supplement. It was suppose to be a whole new permit number.
 

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You may not want him as a partner. Especially if he blows up the neighborhood!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You may not want him as a partner. Especially if he blows up the neighborhood!
No partnership whatsoever. I don't know who to expect when we are there finishing the rough on Monday. It should be interesting. There has been no other permit pulled or at least approved on this project. (The AHJ has an online permit/inspection/status program)

I might just have a bit of fun with this one.

There is some electrical work involved with the other projects and if they think they can skate by on my license they are going to have a rude awakening.

I'm actually looking forward to this since there will most likely be a confrontation Monday when these people start showing up.

I'll be professional as usual, but I wondered if any of you have ever had this situation occur.
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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Sounds like the secondary contractor won't be ready for rough by Monday. So you could just give the inspector a heads-up to watch for anything that's been done in those areas when he comes for final. :whistling:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sounds like the secondary contractor won't be ready for rough by Monday. So you could just give the inspector a heads-up to watch for anything that's been done in those areas when he comes for final. :whistling:
Good point, but the flooring guy (also unknown) will be in there for about 10 days with his buddies to do these other projects. I will make it known to the AHJ that these are 2 separate projects on the electrical end and I want their work inspected (and tagged) separately. Who knows, they might be good.

(But I'm guessing not, since they claimed to be able to do a closet build out into the attic in 3 days....and got the job.)

This should be interesting and I will keep you all posted.

Prior to then, if any of you have been in this situation before I would appreciate your insight and how it worked out.
 

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Never been in that situation before, but I have this in my contract:

E. WORK PERFORMED BY OWNER OR OWNER'S SEPARATE SUBCONTRACTORS
Any labor or materials provided by the Owner's separate Subcontractors while Contractor is still working on this project must be supervised by Contractor. Profit and overhead will be charged on all labor and materials provided by Owner's separate Subcontractors while Contractor is still working on the project. Contractor has right to qualify and approve Owner's Subcontractors and require evidence of work experience, proper licensing, and insurance. If Owner wants to avoid paying Contractor's profit and overhead per this section, Owner must then bring in his separate Subcontractors only before or after Contractor has performed all of his work.
 

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Does the homeowner understand that the permit has a specific scope, or why you can't allow another electrician to do work under your permit?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Does the homeowner understand that the permit has a specific scope, or why you can't allow another electrician to do work under your permit?
He will understand tomorrow. I found out sort of accidentally that this would be happening.
 

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I like E.

If they're on your permit just start charging profit on their portion of the work.
 

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I have had it happen twice, neither was a problem. Each permit has areas listed and what devices are going in. Inspector just inspected what was on the list, if it said kitchen that's all he looked at. Came back to look at the bathroom later.

I did let him know exactly what I was responsible for ahead of time.
No problems though
 

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Yes that is very awkward. To the point of telling the guy to just let your new guys do it all, walk, and lose money.

Or put on your happy face, do your scope of work. Get paid and move on.

I've been on quit a few remodels where the electrical contract has changed hands. Normally personality conflict and sometimes they find another guy at a lower cost.

The ''other guy'' will/may feel awkward too. Or he could be a total prick.

Good luck.
 

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He will understand tomorrow. I found out sort of accidentally that this would be happening.
As RRK says, it doesn't have to be a problem. If you want to be nice to the homeowner, talk to him or her before it becomes the inspector's business, so the other contractor has time to pull permits, or maybe delay starting the work.

Or you can be not as nice, in which case things might be more amusing, but with some disruption to you, if the inspector stops work on the house.

Document things; take pictures; if the contract isn't perfectly clear, write an e-mail or letter clarifying any warranty issues, explaining that you don't have to clean up their mess at the end of the day, and so on.
 

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My contract states no other subs then my own. Period. very clear we what signed and if you back out for some else you still pay me in full no options except house lean. I will not tolerate that chit. Especially in the middle of the job. I know he's here that if that happens the job will have a break in and your tool disappear or your work will be compromised and your life will be hell to the point quit and the first contractor finishes what he started.
 

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My contract states no other subs then my own. Period. very clear we what signed and if you back out for some else you still pay me in full no options except house lean. I will not tolerate that chit. Especially in the middle of the job. I know he's here that if that happens the job will have a break in and your tool disappear or your work will be compromised and your life will be hell to the point quit and the first contractor finishes what he started.
It's probably an insurance violation as well.
 

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The issue of concern is that it's my name on the permit.
I don't know how they issue permits there. But around here the electrical permits are on a completely different jurisdiction than the building permits. Electrical permits and inspections are done through Labor and Industries, building permits are done through the city building department. The electricians name doesn't go on any of the building permits so it wouldn't be an issue. I'm guessing Chicago is different? and your name goes on the building permits. If that's the case, they probably just want to know there's a qualified electrician on the job and be sure the builder isn't doing the wiring himself. If I were you, I would explain to the electrical inspector what's happening so he knows what's going on. Inspectors and the building department are usually pretty reasonable as long as you don't try and hide anything.

And I take that back when I said I've never been in the situation before. My dad built a restaurant with another contractor and decided to do all the paper work with the HVAC guys himself. His contractor was nice enough to let him do it and not even charge a markup for the work. But he still had to be there watching everything. To my knowledge, nothing really went wrong but my guess is the GC felt it financially. In your case, good communication is the key is all I can say.
 
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