Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
711 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good Day Gents! I am a carpenter who sometimes lays tile. I've done a number of jobs that i was happy with(as was the client). I have one coming up that involves 18" floor tile,and iwas going to use the fiber rock backer board as well. I know that i should probably back butter the tiles. But any other help would be awesome. I have also seen some guys put backer down dry and some thinset it down,..any preference? And should i use a notched trowel bigger than 1/4x1/4?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,678 Posts
We just had 18x18 tiles put down in a job that I am GC on. You should do what I did. I subbed it out to a friend who knows how to install tile. I have been a carpenter for 25 years but have never done tile and wasn't going to practice on a job. I did watch and pick up some pointers. I am planning to install tile in my own kitchen and 2 baths in a few months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
711 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good lookn out:rolleyes:. I've set tile with good results many times,.. just not 18". I know that the bigger the tile the more prone it is to crack if not set right. So if anyone else has any tips............
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
917 Posts
Back butter, and you want few voids as possible under tile. Its tricky to find the zone, thats where your not fighting every tile to get it down level yet it has a full mud bed. Hardly anyone takes the time to do it right, 9 out of ten tile jobs (big tile) I see are actually terrible.
 

·
Dufus Extrodinaire
Joined
·
159 Posts
18" uses 1/2"x1/2" notch. Bed the durock and use the correct screws. Be sure to let the thinset steep for a bit before using for tiles.
 

·
Tile Contractor
Joined
·
1,249 Posts
I have also seen some guys put backer down dry and some thinset it down,..any preference?
This isn't a matter of personal preference. What does the book say?

I know that i should probably back butter the tiles.
There are no "should probablys" to it, either you need to do it or you don't. What does the book say?

And should i use a notched trowel bigger than 1/4x1/4?
What does the book say?

You see "D"? This is exactly what is wrong with the tile installation business and why so many jobs fail. It is because guys like you take on something you have no business doing without first learning how it is to be done by industry standards.

What about the substrate? What is the "plane-tolerance" for 18" tiles and does your floor meet those specifications?

Does your substrate meet the deflection criteria required for the tile product you are using?

Is the tile ceramic or stone? Big difference with what must be done for the substrate to qualify.

I am a carpenter who sometimes lays tile.
Would you also do brain surgery if there was a buck or two in it?

"D", go to the TCNA website and buy a book on industry standards and recommendations before you dick around with something as risky as 18" tiles.:)

Go get some real experience then tackle a tile job. Don't shoot from the hip with some unsuspecting customer's money.:)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,431 Posts
floor has to be flat for those heavy suckers, medium bed mortar will help with sag, flat trowel the backs of the tile, use a 6 ft level to check flat ness
 

·
bathroom guru
Joined
·
1,348 Posts
I'm with Bud on this one.

Installing 18" floor tiles is easy.

Installing 18" floor tiles properly so the installation looks good and will last a lifetime is a different story.

Know your limitations!! I consider myself to be extremely well rounded when it comes to renovations and construction, but, that does not mean I am going to "learn" something new at the expense of a customer.

If you are determined to do this job, follow Buds advice and do a lot of research!
 

·
Tile Contractor
Joined
·
1,249 Posts
I was always confused about 'carpenters' doing tile
Apparently so are they!:wallbash:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
711 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks Bud for putting tile setting and brain surgery on the same level. I don't know what i was thinking. If i was gonna shoot from the hip i would not have even bothered looking for advice. Thank you for showing how much you know..really
"D"
 

·
Paul
Joined
·
4,120 Posts
First cut each tile into 9 pieces. This will solve most of your problems. Is this an auto dealership you are working on?
:laughing::laughing: That made me laugh my ass off :thumbsup:
 

·
tile contractor
Joined
·
979 Posts
It is because guys like you take on something you have no business doing without first learning how it is to be done by industry standards.
Bud, I consider you a good friend, but on this, I gotta say-- seems to me that's exactly what he's doing now, instead of after the fact, and in my mind, that'd be enough to separate him from the hacks out there. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,716 Posts
D.Foster

I've been setting tile for 16+ years. Trained by a very picky old pro. Worked for a tile store for about a year. Any way --Here's my suggestions.

1. Use durrock not hardie backer, Hardie is to stiff and will "ride over" a dip in the sub floor, Creating a springy hollow spot.

2.Firm set the rock to the sub floor.

3.add extra blocking to the joists,if there is any bounce to the floor.

4.Jiffset (floor leveler) any-any- any low spots.

5.Flex Set mud 1/2 by1/2 trowel. Buttering the backs is optional in my opinion,

6.A glazers suction cup is handy to lift tiles when you need to add more mud to eliminate lippage.

7.Use spacers-these heavy tiles like to slide out of place.

8. collect your pay check.

Mike
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
356 Posts
I've replaceded 18" tiles with cracked corners and it was from the tile setter rubbing off excess thinset from the edges but letting his finger drift onto the flat surface along the edge of each tile, this caused about a 1.5" air gap on every corner. If you are setting travertine... I suggest you pass on the job because travertine will crack extremely easily. most customers will go with travertine just to save money on materials. If it's not ceramic or extremely thick tiles I wouldn't touch it unless you let the customer know the possibilities up front concerning the tile's fragility.

MZ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,425 Posts
I suggest you pass on the job because travertine will crack extremely easily. most customers will go with travertine just to save money on materials. If it's not ceramic or extremely thick tiles I wouldn't touch it unless you let the customer know the possibilities up front concerning the tile's fragility.

MZ

If travertine is set properly by a tile proffessional, no warning is required. G
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,431 Posts
I've replaceded 18" tiles with cracked corners and it was from the tile setter rubbing off excess thinset from the edges but letting his finger drift onto the flat surface along the edge of each tile, this caused about a 1.5" air gap on every corner. If you are setting travertine... I suggest you pass on the job because travertine will crack extremely easily. most customers will go with travertine just to save money on materials. If it's not ceramic or extremely thick tiles I wouldn't touch it unless you let the customer know the possibilities up front concerning the tile's fragility.

MZ
thats what prep is for
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top