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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a bathroom remodel coming up in a 1790's colonial. I'm pretty certain I'll find the original wide plank floors just like the surrounding rooms. In the other woods the floor is extremely tight, giving me hope that it could be finished appropriately for a bathroom floor. My clients understand that it could be a dangerous proposition.

I'd love some insight, I'm out of my wheelhouse on this one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have already refinished the floors in the surrounding rooms with HO provided finish and they turned out great. I'm concerned really only because I've never done a wooden floor in a bathroom, especially a 200+ year old floor.

If the floor is in good shape but there are minor gaps, for instance, for what products should I be looking? I'm not concerned with matching the finish in the nearby rooms so I'm completely flexible on the coating product. I guess I don't know where to start, which brands to trust.
 

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If the gaps are unsightly you can pull up the floorboards and relay them, milling the edges if needed. I only use Lenmar for oil based finish. I'm sure other guys will be along shortly with what they use. Wood in a bathroom is not a big deal as long as there isn't prolonged standing water on the floor. I recently repaired a 200 year old Pine floor in Windsor CT. The toilet sweating over many years damaged the boards around the toilet. I went to a local lumber mill and hand picked a few boards that had similar grain structure, planed and milled, and re-installed. Good as new.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I had considered that. The bathroom is so small I could practically pull and re-lay the floor without changing my schedule. I don't have any pictures but the surrounding rooms are nice and tight. The homeowner is happy to go with subfloor and tile but bringing the old floor back feels right. Just want to make sure I put down the right products.

Fun fact: Bathroom remodel is an upsell from replacing an old toilet as a favor.
 

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As long as the upper groove is stable and there are no signs of nails....excessive wear; you should be fine.

The floor guys around here dialed me in to Bona Traffic. I have used it on my bathroom countertop and a few other things since with great results so far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Bona Traffic is looking pretty good.

I'll take plenty of pictures, I'm starting in two or three weeks but I might swing through to rip up what's in the closet in a few days, just to get a peek.
 

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Traffic is worth what it costs. Every innovation Bona has come up with over the years has been poured into that product. It really is idiot proof. And very pretty if you do the right things before you put it on.
 

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Traffic is worth what it costs. Every innovation Bona has come up with over the years has been poured into that product. It really is idiot proof. And very pretty if you do the right things before you put it on.
Id beg to differ with you on this one.

Theres cyanide burns. Do not touch the part b catalyst!

Death from ingestion or anaphylactic shock from sensitization.

Theres also the fussiness of applying short open time coatings, particularly in large cut up areas like five hundred foot kitchens with closets and islands.

Finally you can use a screen instead one of the higher grit inter coat abrasion systems like champaigne strips or sand dollars etc and end up with spider webbing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Metro M & L said:
Id beg to differ with you on this one. Theres cyanide burns. Do not touch the part b catalyst! Death from ingestion or anaphylactic shock from sensitization. Theres also the fussiness of applying short open time coatings, particularly in large cut up areas like five hundred foot kitchens with closets and islands. Finally you can use a screen instead one of the higher grit inter coat abrasion systems like champaigne strips or sand dollars etc and end up with spider webbing.
So it's not idiot proof but it would still be your recommendation, did I read that right?

What about Bona Traffic Anti-Slip? A bathroom sounds like a good application for the anti-slip but will it feel sticky or tacky under bare feet?

A trip to a Bona supplier is in my near future, but not too near because it's probably an hour away.
 

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On a side note, I do not find wood floors to be particularly slippery, even in a bathroom. Putting Pledge or another similar polish will make them slick, but the oil based finish I use does not leave a slippery finish.
 

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Bona Traffic is an excellent product, but being a catalyzed finish it does take some getting used to due to its short open time. My only complaint is it has a 'plastic' look to it. Using their Amberseal as a first coat diminishes the look somewhat. I've used it in my own home, as well as my parents, and can attest to it's durability. It's pricy though.
 

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I like the catalyzed finishes - I've used StreetShoe a bunch, including doing my house with it - but they have their pros and cons. Even with the amberizers, they don't have the rich look of the oil finishes. There's really no sanding out, buffing, or otherwise fixing flaws in the finish as easily as with an oil finish. If you mess up, it's sand or screen and re-coat. Pay very close attention to coating thickness - too thick is a problem.

You could do a small residential bathroom with either a catalyzed finish or a pro-quality oil finish and be fine. I'd focus on the aesthetic requirement and quality of application.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
ArtisanRemod said:
So what's your plan? I'm thinking you could pull it up, square the edges and relay?
That's the plan.

There might be one more wide plank board in the attic to make up for the existing gaps I'll close plus the waste from ripping them square. The new vanity will cover the boards that need a crosscut on the ends.

There are another 2 or 3 boards under the fiberglass shower stall and closet that will get demo'd and replaced with a tile on shower later this year. If I don't find anything in the attic I'd be tempted to leave the last board out to fit in when we do the shower.

Is there something I could or should do to the subfloor before relaying the old pine?
 
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