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This old house has 6 fireplaces (fireplace in every room), and one brick oven. the main fireplace has a brick oven that goes into the same flu. The home owner wants to use the brick oven, only problem is they have a stainless steel liner that is hooked up to a woodstove. I'm wondering, is it ok to use the bread oven? Would the bread oven need its own flu liner?
 

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This old house has 6 fireplaces (fireplace in every room), and one brick oven. the main fireplace has a brick oven that goes into the same flu. The home owner wants to use the brick oven, only problem is they have a stainless steel liner that is hooked up to a woodstove. I'm wondering, is it ok to use the bread oven? Would the bread oven need its own flu liner?
What do you mean? You certainly don't want to vent the smoke and heat into a flue that has a liner running inside it.

How big is the oven? How big is the flue? Why is there a liner...Is the flue damaged? What condition is the oven? Is it an early beehive oven or retro built? Does the oven have a throat and flue?...off the back? ( squirrel tail)... off the front? Does it have only an opening were the heat and smoke flow to the fp flue?

Why are there no pics?!!!!
 

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What condition is the beehive in? The reason I ask is over the last 250 years I bet mice have been dragging lovely pieces of tinder into all the nooks and crannys of that chimney.
I see it all the time doing repairs on old chimneys.
Just be aware of that.
 

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Rebuild. Youll waste hours of your life trying to come up with a game plan and most times people dont go through wiyh it
 

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This old house has six fireplace`s, What does norm or tommy say it needs?????. he,he
 

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every appliance requires it's own flue is the basic answer, regardless of what the flue is made from. There may be some exceptions with natural gas appliances but not that I am aware of. Absolutely though all solid fuel burning appliances require their own flue.

Pics would really be nice. Really. Really really nice. And good. Thanks.


Please
 

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every appliance requires it's own flue is the basic answer, regardless of what the flue is made from. There may be some exceptions with natural gas appliances but not that I am aware of. Absolutely though all solid fuel burning appliances require their own flue.
Around here, an oil furnace can share one with a wood stove or fireplace.

Running separate flues in one chimney for two different fireplaces is a really bad idea - worse than just running one flue with two wood stoves or fireplaces (also a bad idea). Chances are the smoke is going to be drawn down the cold flue into the house.
 

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Around here, an oil furnace can share one with a wood stove or fireplace.

Running separate flues in one chimney for two different fireplaces is a really bad idea - worse than just running one flue with two wood stoves or fireplaces (also a bad idea). Chances are the smoke is going to be drawn down the cold flue into the house.
Ive build probably dozens of chimneys with 2 fireplace and never had a complaint. Ive built a few with 3 as well.

1 time I did have a funky interdraft with a furnace though.

There needs to be that 4" wall in between the flues now though(because the people who write the code dont know the difference between a flue and a flue chamber), so that will all but eliminate this issue.
 

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Around here, an oil furnace can share one with a wood stove or fireplace.

Running separate flues in one chimney for two different fireplaces is a really bad idea - worse than just running one flue with two wood stoves or fireplaces (also a bad idea). Chances are the smoke is going to be drawn down the cold flue into the house.
Wait...........What?!?!???:blink:
 

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Wait...........What?!?!???:blink:
If you have a fairly tight house, makeup air to replace the air going up the fireplace chimney has to come from somewhere. That makeup air may very well be drawn down the adjacent cold flue, dawning smoke into the house.

The historical way of dealing with multiple fireplaces / wood stoves on a single chimney is to just use the single chimney with no separate flue. I've seen 6 on one chimney. In normal operation, it works fine. In the event of a chimney fire, this can get pretty exciting.

Edit: Just to clarify, there are very large houses / mansions with multiple original flues in a single chimney, but that wasn't the common method for the average house.
 

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The historical way of dealing with multiple fireplaces / wood stoves on a single chimney is to just use the single chimney with no separate flue. I've seen 6 on one chimney. In normal operation, it works fine. In the event of a chimney fire, this can get pretty exciting.
I've seen similar too, a huge central chase with several FP connected to it. I don't remember exactly, but most of them are 18th century.
 

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I've seen similar too, a huge central chase with several FP connected to it. I don't remember exactly, but most of them are 18th century.
That's the right time frame. I've seen a lot with 2 per floor, and then add in the kitchen and a summer kitchen, and you're up to 6. Victorian era I see mainly 2 per floor, possibly only 1.
 

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Weird I've never seen anything but individual flues for each FP, they often go into one chimney if they are close enough together but always separate flues. I've rebuild dozens anywhere from 1850-1920 and they are all the same. One large flue would have more of a tendency for downdraft and the smoke mingling in that one huge flue would be turbulent to say the least, not to mention lazy

Dampers solve the problem of smoke getting drawn back down the chimney. Also loosely built older buildings allow more than enough makeup air in old houses and fresh air intakes are "enough" for new buildings (don't get me started on fresh air intakes).

Take a look at your code book, i know that mine says that each solid fuel appliance requires it's own flue
 
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