Special Mix Design Loads Of Cracks A Year Later. - Page 2 - Concrete & Paving - Contractor Talk

Special Mix Design Loads Of Cracks A Year Later.

 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-21-2018, 10:09 PM   #21
Pro
 
Fouthgeneration's Avatar
 
Trade: Masonry
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Middle
Posts: 2,337
Rewards Points: 8,341

Re: Special Mix Design Loads Of Cracks A Year Later.


All other things being equal, Pump-able concrete will always crack more than non pumped similar mixes, because you can use larger aggregate, thus less cement/ water = less cracks,


pouring cheap mixes, wheel it into place or use a crane bucket....

No sealer? 3000 PSI on any part of public building is larceny in my opinion....Unless it is supposed to be torn out soon...

Dry sub base.... low humidity and NO sealer/burlap?
Sharp inside 90 degree corners are "crack risers" round out the sharp corners with some expansion or grinding.

Presence of exspansive clays in base material or cliche type soils? I.E.crappy fill products?

Over poured footings 'trapping' sidewalks... or inadequate control joint depth and or thickness of materials....
__________________
I might be an Idiot, but I know things that You don't: Please wait till after you get my know-how to insult me....
Fouthgeneration is online now  
The Following User Says Thank You to Fouthgeneration For This Useful Post:
Sir Mixalot (07-23-2018)

Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. ContractorTalk.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

   

Advertisement

 

Old 07-22-2018, 07:29 AM   #22
Pro
 
NYCB's Avatar
 
Trade: Concrete/Masonry
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Central NY
Posts: 1,668
Rewards Points: 400

Re: Special Mix Design Loads Of Cracks A Year Later.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Fouthgeneration View Post
All other things being equal, Pump-able concrete will always crack more than non pumped similar mixes, because you can use larger aggregate, thus less cement/ water = less cracks,


pouring cheap mixes, wheel it into place or use a crane bucket....

No sealer? 3000 PSI on any part of public building is larceny in my opinion....Unless it is supposed to be torn out soon...

Dry sub base.... low humidity and NO sealer/burlap?
Sharp inside 90 degree corners are "crack risers" round out the sharp corners with some expansion or grinding.

Presence of exspansive clays in base material or cliche type soils? I.E.crappy fill products?

Over poured footings 'trapping' sidewalks... or inadequate control joint depth and or thickness of materials....
My provider can pump the exact same mix that we normally order. 4000 with #1 stone and micro fiber is my go to mix for everything but footers, air content dependent on the purpose of the work.

3000 does seem like a chinsy way to order for most things, even though the plans often say 3000 on them. Ordering up is cheap insurance incase the load gets over hydrated a bit, plus those extra fines in the cream make getting a good finish on a floor a lot easier.

We had a guy order us 5000 one time because he was a nervous nelly type, talk about a creamy mix, it floated and troweled beautiful with the machine, but it did kick faster than usual.
NYCB is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to NYCB For This Useful Post:
Fouthgeneration (07-22-2018)
Old 07-23-2018, 08:33 AM   #23
New Guy
 
PancakeBrock's Avatar
 
Trade: Concrete, Steel, and General
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 26
Rewards Points: 58

Re: Special Mix Design Loads Of Cracks A Year Later.


Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCB View Post
My provider can pump the exact same mix that we normally order. 4000 with #1 stone and micro fiber is my go to mix for everything but footers, air content dependent on the purpose of the work.

3000 does seem like a chinsy way to order for most things, even though the plans often say 3000 on them. Ordering up is cheap insurance incase the load gets over hydrated a bit, plus those extra fines in the cream make getting a good finish on a floor a lot easier.

We had a guy order us 5000 one time because he was a nervous nelly type, talk about a creamy mix, it floated and troweled beautiful with the machine, but it did kick faster than usual.
Around here the usual mix for everyone is 3000 with 1" rock and micro fiber. It'd be nice to do most things out of 4000 but I'm already the highest priced concrete guy in my area. Most of these guys still do concrete at the same price my dad did it 20 years ago...I have no clue how they survive. House slabs for $4.50 a foot and exterior for $3.50. 3000 with fiber is $124 a yard right now.

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
PancakeBrock is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 07-23-2018, 09:36 AM   #24
Pro
 
NYCB's Avatar
 
Trade: Concrete/Masonry
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Central NY
Posts: 1,668
Rewards Points: 400

Re: Special Mix Design Loads Of Cracks A Year Later.


Quote:
Originally Posted by PancakeBrock View Post
Around here the usual mix for everyone is 3000 with 1" rock and micro fiber. It'd be nice to do most things out of 4000 but I'm already the highest priced concrete guy in my area. Most of these guys still do concrete at the same price my dad did it 20 years ago...I have no clue how they survive. House slabs for $4.50 a foot and exterior for $3.50. 3000 with fiber is $124 a yard right now.

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
That sounds about the same as my price for 4000 (before tax).

What is the difference per yard between the two, maybe 8 bucks?

$3.50/ft is like the price I was charging for flat work when I first started and didn't know any better.

I would rather stay home and eat peanut butter than do it for that now.

I think my new interior floors are running like $5/foot right now to just show up and put the floor in, a few more bucks a foot if I'm doing the grade work too.

I'm heading towards being one of the higher priced guys in the local area also (aside from the big hitters, but they have lots of overhead and bid much larger jobs), but it's pretty nice to get less work and make more money.

If Bob the Handyman wants to do a floor for material plus $400, more power to him, not me any more.
NYCB is offline  
Old 07-23-2018, 10:04 AM   #25
New Guy
 
PancakeBrock's Avatar
 
Trade: Concrete, Steel, and General
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 26
Rewards Points: 58

Re: Special Mix Design Loads Of Cracks A Year Later.


Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCB View Post
That sounds about the same as my price for 4000 (before tax).

What is the difference per yard between the two, maybe 8 bucks?

$3.50/ft is like the price I was charging for flat work when I first started and didn't know any better.

I would rather stay home and eat peanut butter than do it for that now.

I think my new interior floors are running like $5/foot right now to just show up and put the floor in, a few more bucks a foot if I'm doing the grade work too.

I'm heading towards being one of the higher priced guys in the local area also (aside from the big hitters, but they have lots of overhead and bid much larger jobs), but it's pretty nice to get less work and make more money.

If Bob the Handyman wants to do a floor for material plus $400, more power to him, not me any more.
Every 1000psi adds $10. I pretty much don't do new construction residential any more because I'm not going to do it for nothing. The crazy thing is my two main competitors are concrete contractors and do stuff for cheap. When I do a house I use jumping jack compactors and pack the dirt every few inches while my competition throws dirt in with a loader then compacts it with the wheels at the end. The only new houses I've done lately are large multi million dollar houses. The last one I did was over 8000sqft out in the middle of no where 2.5-3 hours away. I've poured a ton of mud and have never seen it fall apart like it is on this school job.

Edit: and those prices are including doing all the dirt work. To build a house pad up, do footings, form up 12" above the curb, do more dirt inside the forms, and pour. House slabs here only have 12"x18" footings and we don't put rebar in the slab itself but it's still cheap.

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

Advertisement


Last edited by PancakeBrock; 07-23-2018 at 10:07 AM.
PancakeBrock is offline  


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Curious how you'd design & build this pinwheel Finish Carpentry 13 02-02-2014 02:42 PM
well, it's that time of year again. JT Wood Off Topic (Non Trade) 13 04-17-2013 10:47 AM
This is a very good start of the year! Roofcheck Marketing & Sales 11 04-11-2013 07:03 PM
Good New Year Start greg24k General Discussion 30 01-22-2013 09:08 PM

Join Now... It's Fast and FREE!

I am a professional contractor
I am a DIY Homeowner
Drywall Talk is for
PROFESSIONAL CONTRACTORS ONLY!

At DrywallTalk.com we cater exlusivly to professional contractors who make their living as a contractor. Knowing that many homeowners and DIYers are looking for a community to call home, we've created www.DIYChatroom.com DIY Chatroom is full of helpful advices and perfect for DIY homeowners.

Redirecing in 10 seconds
No Thanks
terms of service

Already Have an Account?