Sonatubes And Bigfoot Systems Pier Footing Forms - Concrete & Paving - Contractor Talk

Sonatubes And Bigfoot Systems Pier Footing Forms

 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-30-2016, 07:41 PM   #1
Thread Reading Aficionado
 
Builders Inc.'s Avatar
 
Trade: Certified Building Contractor
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Florida
Posts: 1,801
Rewards Points: 1,458

Sonatubes And Bigfoot Systems Pier Footing Forms


So we have this job where the customer has requested a carport made of all aluminum. Same stuff that is used for screen rooms and pool enclosures. Footing detail was 14"x4' deep with two #5's in the posts. We started it yesterday. Five of us dug and hit water at 14" deep. We have had a lot of rain lately. We pumped the water out of the holes, dug 6" more and the hole fills back up. It is also caving in around it. Kind of like digging a hole 5' away from the shore line on a sandy beach.

The engineer is requesting for us to do a post mounted in the concrete. We tried to install sonatubes but the water and mud is pushing up into the tube. I suggested to the engineer today, what if we pump concrete in the hole and surface mount the post? He said no it would lack shear strength and be susceptible to lateral racking. I basically had to tell the customer that we cannot do the job until it dries out which would be indefinitely. They weren't happy and neither was I.

I am one to deliver what I say I will do. I have seen this situation about 8 years ago. Same thing. We couldn't do the job. There has to be an inexpensive way to achieve this. I was thinking about buying a 14" wide PVC pipe and putting a cap on the bottom. I would then dig down with a small back ho excavator and install it and back fill around it. So I started researching and found Bigfoot base plates for sona tubes. Are these waterproof? Can I install a Bigfoot to a sona tube and sink it in a muddy hole full of water without is filling back up with water and mud? Would I need to wrap the seams with butyl tape to make them water proof? Or do I just need to move on with one customer that I couldn't deliver too.

I felt horrible for letting them down. We have a great review online and have had at least 3 hand written compliments of excellent customer service within the last three years. It just seemed that this customer wasn't happy with us. Idk maybe it was just me.

What's Griz's saying? Some jobs aren't worth doing? This was a two day job. I didn't expect to buy hundreds of dollars of sona tubes and rental equipment to excavate a huge muddy hole. What to do...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Builders Inc. is offline  

Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. ContractorTalk.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

   

Advertisement

 

Old 03-30-2016, 07:56 PM   #2
Talking Head
 
EthanB's Avatar
 
Trade: Poking Things With Sticks
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Rhode Island
Posts: 5,373
Rewards Points: 408

Re: Sonatubes And Bigfoot Systems Pier Footing Forms


Do your best and let that help you sleep at night. I don't think it's possible to leave nothing but happy customers behind you if you're dealing with unknowns.

In wet situations I've had some success with taping a contractor bag on the bottom of the tube so water and mud can't push into the tube.

Advertisement

__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaws View Post
Planer.....
EthanB is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to EthanB For This Useful Post:
Golden view (03-30-2016)
Old 03-30-2016, 08:34 PM   #3
Thread Reading Aficionado
 
Builders Inc.'s Avatar
 
Trade: Certified Building Contractor
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Florida
Posts: 1,801
Rewards Points: 1,458

Re: Sonatubes And Bigfoot Systems Pier Footing Forms


Quote:
Originally Posted by EthanB View Post
taping a contractor bag on the bottom of the tube so water and mud can't push into the tube.


Duh. Dang sometimes you don't see the obvious when it's staring at you in the heat of the moment. Great idea. I'd probably have to do a few bags so their isn't a chance of ripping it.
Builders Inc. is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 03-30-2016, 09:20 PM   #4
Thread Reading Aficionado
 
Builders Inc.'s Avatar
 
Trade: Certified Building Contractor
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Florida
Posts: 1,801
Rewards Points: 1,458

Re: Sonatubes And Bigfoot Systems Pier Footing Forms


Alright. So if the plastic will work for water and mud intrusion that's great. Now the Question lies with what type of equipment will work to dig the hole fast enough to insert the tube in the hole before the walls collapse in the footing. Which would you prefer. 4' deep hole= use a mini skid steer with a 20" bit? Or a trackhoe? The skid steer will work faster but if the dirt is so wet and loose it could collapse as soon as I pull the bit out. The trackhoe would work but would be slower and I probably would have the advantage to dig a slightly larger hole and be able to back fill around the sona tube. But I am limited in space with digging a larger circumference. Tearing up the lawn isn't an issue. It's just dirt. No lawn to tear up. Just some sidewalks and a exterior wall of a building near by.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Builders Inc. is offline  
Old 03-31-2016, 01:22 AM   #5
Love me some Concrete
 
brhokel606's Avatar
 
Trade: General Contractor
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Iowa
Posts: 1,834
Rewards Points: 4,125

Re: Sonatubes And Bigfoot Systems Pier Footing Forms


I am not sure if this will work in your application necessarily, but we have used flyash to dry out and kind of seal areas for concrete before. Dig the hole quickly, use a shop vac with in and out hoses and suck water until you can get sonotube and flyash into the hole, then fill with concrete.

Concrete will cure under water, I have seen guys pour directly into the tubes to make the water run out and be replaced with the concrete. Takes a little longer to cure but make the mix at a 4" slump maximum or go to 3" with some additives and pour right into hole if you can suck out most of the water. My grandpa talked about bridge piers back in the day being forms under water and they would just pour the concrete in, then wait.
__________________
I know I'm crazy...I love concrete
brhokel606 is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to brhokel606 For This Useful Post:
concretemasonry (03-31-2016)
Old 03-31-2016, 05:52 AM   #6
Registered User
 
Phatboy's Avatar
 
Trade: Superintendent
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 11
Rewards Points: 26

Re: Sonatubes And Bigfoot Systems Pier Footing Forms


Is it possible to dig a Dewatering pit in close enough proximity to your post locations so that you can keep a pump running constantly bringing the water table down in the area through your pours. If the dewatering pit is lower then your footing depths and flows through the soil good enough this could work


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Phatboy is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Phatboy For This Useful Post:
brhokel606 (03-31-2016)
Old 04-03-2016, 12:49 PM   #7
Registered User
 
ctconcretepro's Avatar
 
Trade: concrete
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 1
Rewards Points: 6

Re: Sonatubes And Bigfoot Systems Pier Footing Forms


Hi Builders,
I have read your post about the problem you are having with your project.
I feel the same as you in that when I tell a H.O. i will do the job, i sure as hell want to deliver. I don't think any of the solutions you are suggesting will work in your case. You just cant make them waterproof. What we do here is purchase precast concrete piers in lengths of 4' or 5'. These are made with a square or round base 24" diameter with a round pier on top all
cast together with the rebar encased. Simply dig your required depth and lower unit in place and back fill. I like to go 6" deeper and drop in 3/4" crushed stone to stabilize bottom in wet conditions. These typically weigh around 900 lbs each and cost us about $95.00 each. Even without the water problem you are describing I think this is a more economical way to go in a lot of cases over digging, install the big foot, attach the cardbord tube, backfill, and then purchase and mix or pour the concrete. If you already have the mini ex on site to dig, they have a rebar or wire loop cast into the top for lifting and placing. Simply cut off loop with grinder or cut saw and your ready to go. I hope this helps.
Regards,
TF
ctconcretepro is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to ctconcretepro For This Useful Post:
Builders Inc. (04-03-2016)
Old 04-03-2016, 01:29 PM   #8
Pro
 
Dan_Watson's Avatar
 
Trade: Remodeling Contractor/Helical Post Installer
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: South Jersey
Posts: 4,364
Rewards Points: 2,748

Re: Sonatubes And Bigfoot Systems Pier Footing Forms


Or just use helical

Advertisement

Dan_Watson is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Dan_Watson For This Useful Post:
Builders Inc. (04-03-2016)


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Join Now... It's Fast and FREE!

I am a professional contractor
I am a DIY Homeowner
Drywall Talk is for
PROFESSIONAL CONTRACTORS ONLY!

At DrywallTalk.com we cater exlusivly to professional contractors who make their living as a contractor. Knowing that many homeowners and DIYers are looking for a community to call home, we've created www.DIYChatroom.com DIY Chatroom is full of helpful advices and perfect for DIY homeowners.

Redirecing in 10 seconds
No Thanks
terms of service

Already Have an Account?