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Interior Window Trim

 
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Old 04-15-2012, 11:02 AM   #1
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Interior Window Trim


This is something most professional painters I know never really get right. Only a few of them can put it on totally smooth, flawless, and make it really stand out. Are there any experienced painters here that have a technique to paint an entire picture framed window trim package? I'm talking a step by step process to get it to look like furniture. I know preparation is important, which is about 75% of getting a good quality paint job, that's what an old painter told me. But I can sand and fill a window sill perfectly and still not have it come out quite right.
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Old 04-15-2012, 12:37 PM   #2
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Re: Interior Window Trim


mask it and spray it out. one coat oil primer. sand. two top coats. cut moving parts and move window after each coat.

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Old 04-15-2012, 01:17 PM   #3
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Re: Interior Window Trim


Spraying is the preferred method of course, but if you are talking about applying with a brush, then the key is keeping the wet edge. Experienced painters develop these skills over time and repetition...some never get it of course, but you need to apply the paint heavy enough so that as it is drying, the brush marks can disappear into the wet paint film. If the paint isn't on there heavy enough (the paint film is too dry or shallow) then the brush marks will remain. Also, if you are applying latex/acrylics, this is especially difficult because most novice painters will overbrush/overwork the paint and actually start pulling paint off that has already started to tack up. So, apply the paint heavy (but not so heavy that it sags) and once you are done working on a section, leave it be. Also, using a roller to just get the paint on fast is also a good trick...this way you are not losing time travelling your brush to and from the can for dipping.
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Old 04-15-2012, 01:46 PM   #4
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Re: Interior Window Trim


In addition to the above comments, a high quality paint never hurts, especially an oil-base. Oil base has a much longer drying time, but because of that, it levels out more eliminating brush strokes or chalking that might occur from spraying too lightly.

For instance, Behr latex is designed to dry quickly and has a lot of adhesive in it which makes it thick at the same time. This is great for a DIYer who never sands and cleans the surface they'll painting, but for a pro who does all this and wants maximum results, it has a much higher potential for leaving heavy brush strokes.

On the other hand, something like Benjamin Moore Impervo takes almost a day to dry completely, but during the first few hours, the surface tension naturally levels out the brush strokes and creates a smooth finish. Also, oil base has the added benefit of being more durable and thus cleanable.
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Old 04-15-2012, 02:43 PM   #5
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Re: Interior Window Trim


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethos View Post
In addition to the above comments, a high quality paint never hurts, especially an oil-base. Oil base has a much longer drying time, but because of that, it levels out more eliminating brush strokes or chalking that might occur from spraying too lightly.

For instance, Behr latex is designed to dry quickly and has a lot of adhesive in it which makes it thick at the same time. This is great for a DIYer who never sands and cleans the surface they'll painting, but for a pro who does all this and wants maximum results, it has a much higher potential for leaving heavy brush strokes.

On the other hand, something like Benjamin Moore Impervo takes almost a day to dry completely, but during the first few hours, the surface tension naturally levels out the brush strokes and creates a smooth finish. Also, oil base has the added benefit of being more durable and thus cleanable.
Ethos latex/ acryllic is also durable and cleanable.

I personally dont use impervo anymore, theres no need with so many good waterbase products out there. Oil will yellow over time, you dont get that with latex. As far as durability, after 2 weeks of cure time most good latex trim paints are just as durable, also very washable.



To the OP, sanding in between coats with 220 helps. Always sand after primer coat, at a minimum..the primer raises the grain in the wood giving it a rough feel. If your brushing..as already mentioned in an above post. WET EDGE..dont get ahead of yourself. Alwasy keep a wet edge. Knowing when you are applying too much that it sags, and knowing when you have to little that you are reaching is pretty key too.
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Old 04-15-2012, 06:07 PM   #6
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Re: Interior Window Trim


I can use a shellac primer, OK sure it's fifty bucks a can but it sands so nice in short time. Then a couple coats of Advance alkyd for top coat, the gloss seems a bit excessive but it sure looks fine, there is a semi gloss that is as good. As long as you don't intend to sand between the two top coats it isn't a stretch to do them in one day, the can says fifteen hours between coats, I haven't seen the logic for it except that it needs time to get dry for a sanding . If I were to sand latex after two hours it would still be too rubbery. Since it is a water based alkyd I assume it won't be yellowing too quick. Yellowing usually happens in low light areas though certainly not on windows. A mini roller for the bay window areas is going to level out and look like oil would. At least with the advance you can choose a wide range of colors and the leftover doesn't dry out. I have noticed that the touch up paint potentially looses it's glossy , like the drier 's got misplaced. Even a latex levels out better over Bin than overtop the water primers. 2 cents
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Old 04-15-2012, 06:50 PM   #7
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Re: Interior Window Trim


With latex paint add Floetrol to the paint. It will help it flow and retards the dry time.
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Old 04-15-2012, 10:13 PM   #8
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Re: Interior Window Trim


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With latex paint add Floetrol to the paint. It will help it flow and retards the dry time.
Just don't ever add floetrol in any amount to SW pro classic and then spray a custom entertainment center...it will sag!
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Old 04-15-2012, 10:27 PM   #9
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Re: Interior Window Trim


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Just don't ever add floetrol in any amount to SW pro classic and then spray a custom entertainment center...it will sag!
If I understand it right, Floetrol is meant for horizontal applications. If it's a vertical application, then yes it will thin out the paint causing rungs and creating sagging.
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Old 04-15-2012, 10:33 PM   #10
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Re: Interior Window Trim


Quote:
Originally Posted by CarlW View Post
Spraying is the preferred method of course, but if you are talking about applying with a brush, then the key is keeping the wet edge. Experienced painters develop these skills over time and repetition...some never get it of course, but you need to apply the paint heavy enough so that as it is drying, the brush marks can disappear into the wet paint film. If the paint isn't on there heavy enough (the paint film is too dry or shallow) then the brush marks will remain. Also, if you are applying latex/acrylics, this is especially difficult because most novice painters will overbrush/overwork the paint and actually start pulling paint off that has already started to tack up. So, apply the paint heavy (but not so heavy that it sags) and once you are done working on a section, leave it be. Also, using a roller to just get the paint on fast is also a good trick...this way you are not losing time travelling your brush to and from the can for dipping.
Interesting, I always figured for a second or third coat you want to put it on light to avoid brush marks. Maybe that's what my problem was. And you're saying once it tacks up, don't smooth it out with a brush? Isn't that how you alleviate puddles or rungs?
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Old 04-15-2012, 10:42 PM   #11
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Re: Interior Window Trim


Quote:
Originally Posted by KennMacMoragh

If I understand it right, Floetrol is meant for horizontal applications. If it's a vertical application, then yes it will thin out the paint causing rungs and creating sagging.
Oh yes..learned that from the school of hard knocks years back. Interesting enough was that pro classic without floetrol wanted to sag on vertical surfaces too...and that was with a 211 tip.
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Old 04-15-2012, 10:56 PM   #12
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Re: Interior Window Trim


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Just don't ever add floetrol in any amount to SW pro classic and then spray a custom entertainment center...it will sag!
Pro Classic sags enough on it's own. I absolutely loathe that paint, although it's probably user error more than anything It also seems to oddly cause beads to form out of nowhere 20 minutes after it's been applied.
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Old 04-15-2012, 11:10 PM   #13
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Re: Interior Window Trim


Quote:
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Pro Classic sags enough on it's own. I absolutely loathe that paint, although it's probably user error more than anything It also seems to oddly cause beads to form out of nowhere 20 minutes after it's been applied.
Oh yeah I will definitely admit to some user error. Won't make those mistakes again...and it still ended up good!
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Old 04-15-2012, 11:40 PM   #14
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Re: Interior Window Trim


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Originally Posted by KennMacMoragh View Post
Interesting, I always figured for a second or third coat you want to put it on light to avoid brush marks. Maybe that's what my problem was. And you're saying once it tacks up, don't smooth it out with a brush? Isn't that how you alleviate puddles or rungs?
IF you brush it out right..you shouldnt have to go back and alleviate any puddles or rungs. Brush away from the corners. If your talking about where the casing meets the floor..sometimes you cant really avoid it..just let it pool and use a dull blade to get it up.

IF the paint is already tacked up, your just going to cause the finish to curdle by brushing it out. All the brushing should be done before it begins to tack up
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Old 04-15-2012, 11:44 PM   #15
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Re: Interior Window Trim


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Oh yeah I will definitely admit to some user error. Won't make those mistakes again...and it still ended up good!
Oh, I meant user error on MY part. I've used Pro Classic 3 times now, and I've always had beading problems with the latex for some reason.
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Old 04-16-2012, 12:07 AM   #16
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Re: Interior Window Trim


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Oh, I meant user error on MY part. I've used Pro Classic 3 times now, and I've always had beading problems with the latex for some reason.
Are you mixing the paint up with a stirring stick or are you just shaking it up with your hands?
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Old 04-16-2012, 12:14 AM   #17
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Re: Interior Window Trim


I get my guys to use bondo and glazing putty to make the seams go away. Spraying is better, I only have two guys who are top end brush guys.
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Old 04-16-2012, 12:44 AM   #18
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Re: Interior Window Trim


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I get my guys to use bondo and glazing putty to make the seams go away. Spraying is better, I only have two guys who are top end brush guys.
You use glazing putty for what?
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Old 04-16-2012, 12:51 AM   #19
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Are you mixing the paint up with a stirring stick or are you just shaking it up with your hands?
Usually shake first, then with a stick.
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Old 04-16-2012, 01:23 AM   #20
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Re: Interior Window Trim


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Usually shake first, then with a stick.
I just had the problem you were talking about with beading after application for the first time. I was using regal select semi(i dont recommend it) . Reason i asked was i usually always shake up my paint if its right out the shaker at the store..after doing a couple windows and casings i noticed the beading in the shaped grooves of the profile. The next day instead of shaking we gave it a slow stir instead..seemed to help for whatever reason. Problem wasnt as bad.

Ive never had the problem with proclassic though thats strange

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