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Filling A Pond?

 
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Old 08-12-2012, 12:03 PM   #1
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Filling A Pond?


Hello everyone. Awesome site btw. Really enjoy reading all of the interesting topics. I have a question. We are working on a pond that a homeowner had built a few years back but never held water. Of course I call my local soil conservationist and when we make a few sample digs, turns out this pond is setting in one of the finest gravel pits I have seen. The pond is about an acre in size and about 15-17 ft deep near levy end. There is however some excellent white clay on the hillside next to it. My question is if it would be possible to ever hold water if we were to line the pond with say a minimum of 20" of white clay and even more on levy side as to decrease the depth to around 8-10 ft which obviously decreases pressure. Keep in mind though there will be no core dug because we were not able to get out of the rock even at 20' depth. Thanks
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Old 08-12-2012, 02:47 PM   #2
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Re: Filling A Pond?


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...We are working on a pond that...never held water [because it's] setting in one of the finest gravel pits I have seen. The pond is about an acre in size and about 15-17 ft deep near levy end. Would it be possible to ever hold water if we were to line the pond with say a minimum of 20" of white clay and even more on levy side as to decrease the depth to around 8-10 ft which obviously decreases pressure. Keep in mind though there will be no core dug
Only a PE is qualified to give you a definitive answer to that question and there are several other questions that need be posed and answered before you can get to a good answer. Seeings as how you're talking about moving the better part of 3K yards of cut>fill (20" over an acre requires a borrow pit 10'W x 10'D x 723'L) and given the nature of the underlying soils, a geo-liner might be a better option as an alternative to impervious clays.

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Old 08-12-2012, 02:50 PM   #3
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Re: Filling A Pond?


A mod should really fix the title...just sayin'
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Old 08-12-2012, 08:37 PM   #4
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Re: Filling A Pond?


You can try the clay, but I would also till in benotite.

Your best option is a rubber pond liner.
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Old 08-12-2012, 09:13 PM   #5
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Re: Filling A Pond?


I have looked in to beninite. Thankfully the homeowner knows this is just a trial but rather take the chance since he is paying to have It filled anyway. This will be the first experience I have in doing this but have been told in past that 17" white clay will hold water. But I do not know what that is based on in terms of depth,size, etc
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Old 08-12-2012, 10:57 PM   #6
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Re: Filling A Pond?


The clay that I'm familiar with, if placed and compacted well, will hold water. I've never dealt with white clay before so I can't speak to it's qualities. Even then, any pond of any significance around here uses HDPE liners. More expensive, but more predictable too.

If you go the clay route you should really envolve the guys who charge money for their opinon....Good luck!
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Old 08-12-2012, 11:06 PM   #7
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Re: Filling A Pond?


Lots of ways to do a liner, one of the best right now is a polyurea liner. Look up polyurea pond liner on google. It has good stretch ability for ground movement.
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Old 08-13-2012, 06:19 AM   #8
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Re: Filling A Pond?


Just a sidebar question... Why would you want to lose half the depth of the pond?

If it's part of a normal run off area, it'll fill itself over the years...


Ditto on the bentonite
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Old 08-14-2012, 09:04 PM   #9
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Re: Filling A Pond?


By losing half depth, you eliminate a lot of pressure. Thank you all for your responses
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Old 08-14-2012, 11:06 PM   #10
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Re: Filling A Pond?


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By losing half depth, you eliminate a lot of pressure.
A lot? Well, you eliminate half the pressure by halving the depth. Maybe going from 100' deep to 50' deep that might be "a lot" of reduction. Reducing the depth 10' only gets you a corresponding pressure reduction at the pond bottom of about 4 PSI; not quite 30% of "typical" atmospheric pressure at sea level.
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Old 08-15-2012, 06:01 AM   #11
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Re: Filling A Pond?


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Originally Posted by J F View Post
A mod should really fix the title...just sayin'
It's just this type of attitude problem that prevents me from asking how to go about filling those pesky burrs on the copper pipe cuts. :>)

Good Luck
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Old 08-16-2012, 05:37 PM   #12
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Re: Filling A Pond?


If you are going to the expense of filling a 1 acre pond with 8' of clay and compacting, you might as well install the rubber liner. It would be alot cheaper and you still keep your depth.
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Old 08-16-2012, 09:44 PM   #13
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Re: Filling A Pond?


The rubber liner we checked on was a 40 ml liner that cost around 15 k plus labor for install. The white clay is on an embankment right next to the existing pond which can be moved and placed in pond for around 7500
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Old 08-18-2012, 08:24 AM   #14
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Re: Filling A Pond?


Have you put pencil to paper on this?
A quick look at this:
you will need to mobilize in an out equipment.
Say an excavator, 3/4 yard to 1 yard bucket machine to excavate clay
a dump truck to move clay
a dozer to place clay
a sheep's foot compactor
thats about $335.00 per hour, for this conversation, every ones different
You communicated the project would cost $7500.00 to do.
that's 22 hours of work at $335.00 per hour.
I think it will take a lot more then 22 hours to do this work.
And if it rains while you are working on this project, how long will the equipment be tied up on the job site waiting for clay to dry.
Revisit your cost estimating. It will not cost you anything to do that, and may save you a bundle of cash.

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Old 08-26-2012, 01:56 PM   #15
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Re: Filling A Pond?


I do not have the experience with this as most have on here but i will agree with those stating using a liner and not filling in that depth. You will lose depth over time as it is and there is not that much pressure difference. I would however put in 8-12" of clay on top of the liner to one keep it in place when refilling but would help plug any possible leaks cause by holes or overlapping of the liner.

A friend of mine has a man made pond where they used no liner and at least 20" of clay and it does work but he has had issues with losing water through drainage. His pond sits on and old river bed and the river runs by abut 150' away at about 10' elevation drop. When hurricane Irene went through the severe runoff and the break of a beaver damn above washed out the road, his levee holding back a brook that feeds his pond and filled in a large portion of his pond. He lost most of his huge rainbow trout and the pond went from 18' to 12' at best. I went in with my mini-ex and dug out the brook and rebuilt the levee. All the topsoil was gone so i had no way to stop the water from leaching through the levee which was all stone and sand really. I opted to put down two layers of 6mil plastic that i covered the bottom of the brook with and layed it up over the levee and the whole length of. I also ran it the length of the drainage at the end to help prevent any wash outs in the future. I brought in top soil for the top and back side of the levee and seeded it heavily. The grass has grown very well and is now acting as a binder to help prevent washing out. It has been two yrs now and the work i did has held up to the spring rains and several other severe storms.

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