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Knighton 10-27-2011 10:32 AM

Texture Replication
 
1 Attachment(s)
I removed a loadbearing wall and replaced it with an LVL in one of my clients homes. In the process I had to remove some drywall on the ceiling. In attempting to repair the drywall, I'm having difficulty determining just how the light texture was done. I thought it was just a light roll-on texture, but I can't see to get it to look right. Any ideas on how to replicate this texure would be grately appreciated.

Thanks
Chris

thom 10-27-2011 11:44 AM

I think that was done with a splayed texture brush, with multiple slaps in the same location.

Knighton 10-27-2011 03:08 PM

What type of brush would that be?

boman47k 10-27-2011 04:47 PM

Wadded up newspaper or trash bag.

Jk'ing mostly. Sorta.
Sorry, just wanted to get notices as people respond to this thread.

SuperiorHIP 10-27-2011 10:47 PM

Thats a new one. Does it look professionally done everywhere or is it a home owner thing? I always have a much harder time matching a texture that was done with very little skill.

Knighton 10-28-2011 06:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SuperiorHIP (Post 1315843)
Thats a new one. Does it look professionally done everywhere or is it a home owner thing? I always have a much harder time matching a texture that was done with very little skill.

Yeah, its everywhere and it does look good. House was built in early 60s. It has to be some sort of brush, I just can't figure it out.

PSG 10-28-2011 06:45 AM

I found a site www.drywallschool.com that has examples of different textures and explains how to do them.

Knighton 10-28-2011 07:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PSG (Post 1315956)
I found a site www.drywallschool.com that has examples of different textures and explains how to do them.

I've seen that. And while one of his texture examples is sort of close, theres not one thats close enough. I may just have to retexture the whole ceiling in something close. I would just hate to have to do that.

thom 10-28-2011 10:24 AM

30 years ago, around here, a splayed brush was pretty common. The wood brush base is about 8" long, 1-1/2" wide, round on both ends. The brush fibers are about 3" long and splay out in an oval, they are bent so they are flat, so you have a flat oval. The brush fibers leave those lines when lifted. Typically there are two of these brushes on a single handle.

http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=10051&productId=100403181&l angId=-1&catalogId=10053&ci_sku=100403181&ci_kw={keyword} &cm_mmc=shopping-_-googleads-_-pla-_-100403181&ci_gpa=pla&locStoreNum=3502

Generally the brush leaves an oval pattern but if you rotate it and slap it multiple times the lines will have no direction to them.

Knighton 10-28-2011 01:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thom (Post 1316077)
30 years ago, around here, a splayed brush was pretty common. The wood brush base is about 8" long, 1-1/2" wide, round on both ends. The brush fibers are about 3" long and splay out in an oval, they are bent so they are flat, so you have a flat oval. The brush fibers leave those lines when lifted. Typically there are two of these brushes on a single handle.

http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=10051&productId=100403181&l angId=-1&catalogId=10053&ci_sku=100403181&ci_kw={keyword} &cm_mmc=shopping-_-googleads-_-pla-_-100403181&ci_gpa=pla&locStoreNum=3502

Generally the brush leaves an oval pattern but if you rotate it and slap it multiple times the lines will have no direction to them.

Oh, that's what you meant! I always just called that a texture brush. The word "splayed" threw me (though it was certainly a correct use of the word). I was hoping you had a super special secret brush I'd never heard of that would magically work;). I guess I'll play around with that and slapbrush it to see if I can match it .

Thanks for your help.

Rouerplastering 10-28-2011 11:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thom (Post 1316077)
30 years ago, around here, a splayed brush was pretty common. The wood brush base is about 8" long, 1-1/2" wide, round on both ends. The brush fibers are about 3" long and splay out in an oval, they are bent so they are flat, so you have a flat oval. The brush fibers leave those lines when lifted. Typically there are two of these brushes on a single handle.

http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=10051&productId=100403181&l angId=-1&catalogId=10053&ci_sku=100403181&ci_kw={keyword} &cm_mmc=shopping-_-googleads-_-pla-_-100403181&ci_gpa=pla&locStoreNum=3502

Generally the brush leaves an oval pattern but if you rotate it and slap it multiple times the lines will have no direction to them.

around here it's called a crow's foot. And it's
not done with that.

Metro M & L 10-29-2011 12:26 PM

I'm not great with textures but to me that looks like a heavily sprayed orange peel that was pole sanded.

Cole82 10-29-2011 03:33 PM

Is it drywall or veneer plaster? To me it looks like vaneer plaster finished with a wood trowel. It's hard to say though as there is nothing to scale the texture too. Can't tell if they are 1/16" ridges or 1/4" ridges.

Cole

Repairman615 10-29-2011 09:34 PM

I am guessing a knock-down and just maybe, wet sponge after swipe.

Roll on the thinned mud, stomp well rotating the brush, wait and knock down... then maybe wait and sponge it down.

I will admit now that I have trouble too while getting textures to blend. :blink::eek:

redwood 10-31-2011 07:41 PM

I've used thick texture paints with a texture roller that look very similar to that.

Big Shoe 11-01-2011 04:59 AM

Kinda looks like a roller-knockdown. Roll on mud and then knock it down.

You have to tack a sheet of drywall up on your shop/garage ceiling and do some test runs.


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