Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum

Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum (https://www.contractortalk.com/forum.php)
-   Drywall (https://www.contractortalk.com/f49/)
-   -   glue and screw drywall (https://www.contractortalk.com/f49/glue-screw-drywall-109854/)

TNTRenovate 12-24-2011 10:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BrandConst (Post 1367677)
Lazy? Your clueless to say the least! :laughing: Bring yourself down here for a bit and see if you can make a living gluing and screwing. I worked in the drywall business for 7 years and I'm purty darn sure I've seen alot more drywall stuck to the wall than you and it hasnt been glued.

Clueless...I don't think so. But if it makes you feel better, go ahead and think what you want.

If I were down there, I would find a way to make a living gluing and screwing, or I wouldn't do it. It's just a matter of knowing how to sell it. If you are not sold yourself on the benefit, then you will never be able to sell it to your clients.

When it gets down to it, it's not the gluing and screwing that's the problem, it's the low wage illegal workers that drive the cost down to where guys are willing to sacrifice quality to stay in business.

Big Shoe 12-25-2011 06:57 AM

Nobody glues drywall here.....nada........never.......glue.........what 's that...........:blink:

Ancient Rocker 12-25-2011 08:14 AM

I have been using glue for 41 years and discovered the only people who don't glue just don't know any better. Common sense eludes way too many "professional" hangers.

BrandConst 12-25-2011 08:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TNTSERVICES (Post 1367777)
Clueless...I don't think so. But if it makes you feel better, go ahead and think what you want.

If I were down there, I would find a way to make a living gluing and screwing, or I wouldn't do it. It's just a matter of knowing how to sell it. If you are not sold yourself on the benefit, then you will never be able to sell it to your clients.

When it gets down to it, it's not the gluing and screwing that's the problem, it's the low wage illegal workers that drive the cost down to where guys are willing to sacrifice quality to stay in business.


You don't know how things work down here just like I don't know how things work up there so it's a little out of line to say something is lazy. I'm fairly sure if a hurricane blew into Obamaville, IL there would be nothing left.

TNTRenovate 12-25-2011 10:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BrandConst (Post 1367899)
You don't know how things work down here just like I don't know how things work up there so it's a little out of line to say something is lazy. I'm fairly sure if a hurricane blew into Obamaville, IL there would be nothing left.

Funny you say that, I grew up in the Dallas area. All my family lives in around or near Dallas/Ft. Worth. We had to replace my grandparents ceiling because it was falling down from cracks and nail pops. Never would have happened if it were glued and screwed.

I have not seen a house that we owned or any family or friend that didn't have pops all over the ceiling and walls. It's just what you get when you don't do it right.

But what does Hurricanes that have to do with gluing drywall? One has nothing to do with the other. You were saying that you couldn't be competitive using glue, not that it was weather related. That's not apples to apples, more of a strawman argument. Put it up so that you can knock it down.

I know that it is the right thing to do. It is not that much more cost, and the benefit is well worth the expense. But I guess if all one is worried about is getting in and out, then that way of thinking works.

And I wish they required more structural reinforcement here. I know that we experience more tornadoes than you do hurricanes.

Morning Wood 12-25-2011 10:34 AM

What do u glue the drywall with? You gluing it to strapping or right to studs and joists? Is it a pain to pull drywall that has been glued or do u use a glue that comes off easily like silicone or something? What about blueboard? U guys glue blueboard that is getting base coated and skim coated?

TNTRenovate 12-25-2011 10:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Morning Wood (Post 1367941)
What do u glue the drywall with? You gluing it to strapping or right to studs and joists? Is it a pain to pull drywall that has been glued or do u use a glue that comes off easily like silicone or something? What about blueboard? U guys glue blueboard that is getting base coated and skim coated?

1) Liquid Nails, or PL
2) Whatever you are fastening to
3) Yes, but when anything is built right it shouldn't be easy to take apart
4) Blueboard is a mold/midlew resistant product, never used it, but Holmes loves the stuff.

BrandConst 12-25-2011 10:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TNTSERVICES (Post 1367940)
Funny you say that, I grew up in the Dallas area. All my family lives in around or near Dallas/Ft. Worth. We had to replace my grandparents ceiling because it was falling down from cracks and nail pops. Never would have happened if it were glued and screwed.

I have not seen a house that we owned or any family or friend that didn't have pops all over the ceiling and walls. It's just what you get when you don't do it right.

But what does Hurricanes that have to do with gluing drywall? One has nothing to do with the other. You were saying that you couldn't be competitive using glue, not that it was weather related. That's not apples to apples, more of a strawman argument. Put it up so that you can knock it down.

I know that it is the right thing to do. It is not that much more cost, and the benefit is well worth the expense. But I guess if all one is worried about is getting in and out, then that way of thinking works.

And I wish they required more structural reinforcement here. I know that we experience more tornadoes than you do hurricanes.

What hurricanes have to do is your implication of lowering quality. it's baseless and probably something expected of you and the arrogance you exhibit.

I use to be a PM for the 3rd largest restoration company in the U.S. and have yet to see drywall glued when ripping it out after water damage or fire damage and I've been all over the country doing it.

I'm not saying people don't do it but I can tell you right now it's not a standard application at all. Which is why I go back to the point I made earlier....don't accuse people of being lazy because they don't do it like you or it seems useless to do to them.

Have you ever had to pull damaged sheetrock off of a stud that it was glued to?

Ancient Rocker 12-25-2011 11:09 AM

The Naperville boys are correct. When hanging drywall the intent is to fasten it as well as possible so it is a pain in the ass to remove. It is called quality.

BrandConst 12-25-2011 11:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ancient Rocker (Post 1367971)
The Naperville boys are correct. When hanging drywall the intent is to fasten it as well as possible so it is a pain in the ass to remove. It is called quality.

:no: maybe in illinois

Ancient Rocker 12-25-2011 11:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BrandConst (Post 1367978)
:no: maybe in illinois

In Texas it is better to be able to take off drywall than be fastened correctly? Wow, is that awful.

BrandConst 12-25-2011 11:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ancient Rocker (Post 1367982)
In Texas it is better to be able to take off drywall than be fastened correctly? Wow, is that awful.

I built my house 11 years ago and to this day it hasnt one nail pop and I live 5 miles from galveston bay. The standard around here is nailing the perimeter and screwing the field. If you read my posts before I'm not attacking anyones way of installing rock, my two points are:

-it's not the standard application nor is it required by any manufacturer so don't call someone lazy for not doing it.

-second, have you ever had to tear off rock that was glued?

TNTRenovate 12-25-2011 12:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BrandConst (Post 1367949)
What hurricanes have to do is your implication of lowering quality. it's baseless and probably something expected of you and the arrogance you exhibit.

I use to be a PM for the 3rd largest restoration company in the U.S. and have yet to see drywall glued when ripping it out after water damage or fire damage and I've been all over the country doing it.

I'm not saying people don't do it but I can tell you right now it's not a standard application at all. Which is why I go back to the point I made earlier....don't accuse people of being lazy because they don't do it like you or it seems useless to do to them.

Have you ever had to pull damaged sheetrock off of a stud that it was glued to?

What you see as arrogance, I see as confidence. :thumbsup:

Hurricane straps and glue serve a purpose. Hurricane strapping is a method used to secure structures during hurricanes. As you sarcastically pointed out, we don't suffer from hurricanes. While I agree standards should be higher in Tornado alley, it just not the same analogy, and here's why. All homes suffer from different expansion and contraction rates from different materials. Gravity is the same in Texas as it is in Illinois. The purpose of gluing drywall is universal and benefits all drywall jobs.

I still think it lazy not to glue the drywall. You have not presented any other real argument against the use.

1) I can not be competitive in the market. (Just because we don't know a way to do something, doesn't mean that a way does not exist. That's close minded thinking that will leave you in the back of the line looking at those that are moving forward.)

2) You see it as useless. (The word useless means, "with out use". The use is simple and elementary. It prevents cracking, nail pops, and ads strength to the structure.

3) It is not a standard practice. (If you are waiting for things to be standard practice, I guess minimum code is good enough as well?)

It's unfortunate that you would consider the removal of something when installing it. That is backwards and definitely lazy thinking. All you do is remove the drywall and scrape off the glue. I install things to last and not be easily removed. I hope you don't do tile.

Tinstaafl 12-25-2011 12:33 PM

Peace on Earth, good will to men... men. :whistling.

If someone has drywall hanging procedures that make it a sufficiently strong and durable job, omitting extra steps that make it "overbuilt" is not laziness. It's just good practical and business sense.

One of the biggest challenges we face in our search for excellence is learning to recognize when things do and don't matter. :thumbsup:

Tech Dawg 12-25-2011 12:34 PM

Cmon guys... Its Christmas day, don't argue :laughing:

TNTRenovate 12-25-2011 12:41 PM

I just guess I wouldn't consider fixing a common problem "over built". Seriously, what does it cost in extra time and material? Maybe a buck a sheet in glue, and all of about 15 seconds. Now that seems like good and practical business sense!

Rio 12-25-2011 01:59 PM

Merry Christmas but ixnay on the need for gluing drywall in addition to screwing it. If it's screwed correctly I don't see the need to be gluing it also; now for putting down floor sheathing, yeah, construction adhesive and screwnails are the ticket to a stiff diaphragm.....

country_huck 12-25-2011 09:34 PM

57 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by TNTSERVICES (Post 1368056)
Seriously, what does it cost in extra time and material? Maybe a buck a sheet in glue, and all of about 15 seconds. Now that seems like good and practical business sense!

I mean thats pennies comparied to coming back and fixing nail pops and cracking.

sevonty 12-25-2011 09:34 PM

I am not trying to attack anyone only try to understand what I do not as those who do not glue are pros and the brst way to learn is from other pros.
That being said,The purpose of glueing floor is to prevent squekes and nail pops also adding to structure stregth. if it is a ceiling on a 2 story house wher there is floor above would the board hung below not be subjected to the same stress and issues of deflection as the floor above? If the ceiling is to a attic space does the non climate controled attic still not change tempeture and humitity almost at the same rate as the outside, causeing the trusses/ ceiling joist to expand and contract? Over time would these forces not have an effect on the statinary nail/screws in a ever moving joist/truss?
would glue not defend against these forces longer then nothing?

JesseCocozza 12-25-2011 10:29 PM

I guess it really depends on where your working and what kind of engineering is required on the structure. Around here, no one relies on drywall to act as your diaphragm. I know it acts as one when screwed to your ceiling joists / trusses / rafters, but all those framing members are strapped, blocked, braced and inspected before drywall goes up. I would say gluing is a great extra step if all you're doing is nailing it, but I would venture to say the the vast majority screws their rock here. As for the expansion and contraction bit, I can't help to picture what happens to vinyl siding when you set the nail tight rather than leaving it proud for movement. Wouldn't the glue inhibit movement and cause cracking if you're bonding two materials that are subjected to movement?


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:45 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.