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-   -   All purpose vs lightweight compound (https://www.contractortalk.com/f49/all-purpose-vs-lightweight-compound-8547/)

oldgoat 04-07-2006 02:34 AM

All purpose vs lightweight compound
 
I have always just used the all purpose compound on my walls, but I talked to the guys that hung my sheetrock in the garage and they said they use all purpose only to bed the tape and then use the lightweight for the rest. Is this common or just someone's personnal preference type of deal? When is the best use for either kind just for future reference.

maj 04-07-2006 07:03 AM

I don't specialize in drywall, but will do on occasion. I'm like you with the green throughout , but most everyone else around my area are using the blue after the tape coat. It just seems like I have better control with the green, but then that's what I'm used to and I don't do it every day.

IHI 04-07-2006 02:41 PM

Before I started using hot mud I always used green top for bedding-tad bit more crack resistant/less shrinkage and blue top for top coating-sands a bit easier.

Regardless, of whichever you use, if your not mixing water in with it and trying to use it straight out of the bucket your making life alot harder. I've yet to see any pre mix that did'nt need to be thinned down for eaiser application or "control" as it was put. I dont care what brand, what color lid, or type of mud it is, all of it is wetted and mixed so it all has the same consistency I want prior to application. work smarter not harder-esspecially with mud:w00t:

firemike 04-07-2006 04:00 PM

Most people use the all-purpose for bedding because it has more adhesive in it than the lightweight stuff. The lightweight is nicer for the final coats as it sands nicer.

mistersmooth 04-07-2006 06:01 PM

Green lid all the way! The light stuff drags and crumbles in hot weather and I think it's too easy to scratch when sanding. One major reason guys use the light mud is because on a nice drying day you can coat and skim the same day.

Rock & Roll 04-07-2006 06:53 PM

General purpose or "green" mud is intended for your taping coat. The green mud has more adhesive in it, which of course is used to bed the tape properly. The blue or topping compound is then used for each succesive coat. The blue mud is also easier to sand due to less adhesive in it. To eliminate "pock" marks in the topping coats, add 1/2 cup of Dawn dish soap to 5 gallons of blue mud. Mix it well. Only the BLUE Dawn dish soap works properly.

Roc-It! Drywall 04-08-2006 01:15 AM

I'm actually going to try the Dawn in the mud, never done it before...
But are you supposed to use 1/2 CUP of soap to 5 gallons,or just a few drops.....?

toyotatruckin 04-12-2006 11:43 PM

Im a finisher and all purpose is for the tape and light weight is for finishing we also use dish soap in the finishing mud makes it run slick less pock marks we dont measure it though just squirt some in before mixing 1/2 cup per box sounds a bit much I would guess 1/8 or so of a regular sized bottle one thing on the soap in the mud.....it spoils the mud quicker and trust me you will know when your mud spoils it smells like rotten eggs!!!

747 04-13-2006 02:52 AM

I didn't know there were different kinds. I went with the blue lid ready to go in the 5 gallon plastic container. I had a bunch left over.:laughing:

Mike Finley 04-13-2006 09:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oldgoat
I have always just used the all purpose compound on my walls, but I talked to the guys that hung my sheetrock in the garage and they said they use all purpose only to bed the tape and then use the lightweight for the rest. Is this common or just someone's personnal preference type of deal? When is the best use for either kind just for future reference.

It depends on your objectives. Drying compounds are cheaper and easier to initially apply, setting compounds are more expensive, have a new learning curve to get good at them and are not as idiot proof.

The main advantages to setting compounds is they dry chemically so they set up way faster, you can apply all 3 coats in the same day. They are more crack resistant and easier to sand. For repairs I wouldn't think of using anything but setting compounds.

travus 04-13-2006 11:24 PM

There are actually many different choices for mud. "Real strong" mostly for taping and shrinks a lot. "Medium" mud which you can tape with and coat and finish with but is not as strong as taping mud but sands easier than strong mud but doesn't sand as easy as finish mud. "Finish" mud isn't recomended for taping but can be used for coating and finishing. USG makes all purpose for taping, Topping for coating and finshing or Plus 3 which can be used for all 3. I like Hamiltons mud. They have 3-4 taping muds, 4-5 coating muds, and 4-5 finshing muds. They make a multi purpose mud called Hi-LIte that is the best mud in the world. You can even coat back over it when it is still wet and it doesn't drag. I like to tape with Hamiltons red dot taping mud (real strong and smooth with no drips) and then run Hi Lite on everything else.

damudman 04-14-2006 02:25 AM

What I like. ....and works for me........
Green USG...For tape.
Mid-weight ..bed skim
plus 3 junk

oldgoat 04-14-2006 04:44 AM

damudman I hope you are wrong about plus 3 being junk. I believe that is what I bought and have been puting on over the tape. Either way it is too late for that part. Am going to start sanding it this morning when I get home so I will find out if I like it or not. So far I still like the regular all purpose as far as applying anyway. At least since it is my own place I can take the time to trial and error and see which suits me better.

Woz the Painter 04-14-2006 01:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by travus
There are actually many different choices for mud. "Real strong" mostly for taping and shrinks a lot. "Medium" mud which you can tape with and coat and finish with but is not as strong as taping mud but sands easier than strong mud but doesn't sand as easy as finish mud. "Finish" mud isn't recomended for taping but can be used for coating and finishing. USG makes all purpose for taping, Topping for coating and finshing or Plus 3 which can be used for all 3. I like Hamiltons mud. They have 3-4 taping muds, 4-5 coating muds, and 4-5 finshing muds. They make a multi purpose mud called Hi-LIte that is the best mud in the world. You can even coat back over it when it is still wet and it doesn't drag. I like to tape with Hamiltons red dot taping mud (real strong and smooth with no drips) and then run Hi Lite on everything else.

Have never heard of Hamiltons, they have all those muds that you listed how do pick the proper one? Also what part of the country is it sold and or available in? How is price comparable to USG muds?

N.E.Bldg&Rest.LLC 04-14-2006 02:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oldgoat
I have always just used the all purpose compound on my walls, but I talked to the guys that hung my sheetrock in the garage and they said they use all purpose only to bed the tape and then use the lightweight for the rest. Is this common or just someone's personnal preference type of deal? When is the best use for either kind just for future reference.

Every taper i've seen uses the all purpose for all three coats they use a little water and mix it with a drill and paddle for the second and third coats.
And they will use durabond 90 or 45 if they are being rushed.

Here in CT the brands are USG (green top)or Goldbond (black top)

travus 04-18-2006 01:45 AM

Quote:

Have never heard of Hamiltons, they have all those muds that you listed how do pick the proper one? Also what part of the country is it sold and or available in? How is price comparable to USG muds?
They are rated by strength, shrinkage, and sandability if I remember right. Blue dot taping mud is the strongest and is only recomended for taping. They rate all their muds and you choose that way. Basically you have to decide if you want to use 1, 2, or three different kinds. I use two different kinds. Their mud called Hi lite is unbelievable.

They are out of Orange California and their mud is more expensive than USG. Their quickset is way better too. Mixes better and much smoother.

Woz the Painter 04-18-2006 01:59 AM

[QUOTE=travus]They are rated by strength, shrinkage, and sandability if I remember right. Blue dot taping mud is the strongest and is only recomended for taping. They rate all their muds and you choose that way. Basically you have to decide if you want to use 1, 2, or three different kinds. I use two different kinds. Their mud called Hi lite is unbelievable.

They are out of Orange California and their mud is more expensive than USG. Their quickset is way better too. Mixes better and much smoother.[/QUOT Do they have a web site, or do they distribute to the mid-west, I would like to try some of their mud?

travus 04-23-2006 06:54 PM

Here is their website. It looks like they have split into two different websites. They aren't offering as many muds as they used too. They are also offering new items I had seen before. I was not able to find the page where they list all their muds and rate them for shrinkage, sandability etc. There was a little of that in the MSDS section. I also have my copy from days gone by if anyone is interested. http://www.hamiltonnw.com/Home.asp http://www.westpac.bz/Home.asp

DaveH 06-02-2006 12:50 PM

By green and blue I assume you are talking of USG compounds? The green is an all purpose mud which has more adhesive to it for bedding. The light blue or topping compound is just that topping. It is easier to sand and has a slicker finish. The other blue mud is Plus 3 or lightwieght all purpose compound. It has the same amount of adhesive in it but sands much easier. The downside is the hardness of the product. It does gouge easier than topping. There is also purple mud midweight - gray mud - taping mud. They all have a purpose and most overlap as far as use.

AtlanticWBConst 06-02-2006 07:24 PM

We have been doing our own Drywall since early 80's. A friend turned us on to using the light weight compound for the finish coat (only the finish coat). Great advice.
It comes out smoother, less air bubble pockets, much finer grain texture = smoother solid surface. And most importantly, it sands MUCH easier. Very, very, little pressure (if any). Our tapers use a 120 grit sand paper on poles and 150 on Rotary sanders with it.
Much nicer finish with light weight compound. SOLD on it for finish coat!


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