Brooklyn Historic Home Masonry Question #2 - Masonry - Contractor Talk

Brooklyn Historic Home Masonry Question #2

 
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Old 05-12-2019, 04:22 PM   #1
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Brooklyn Historic Home Masonry Question #2


Currently working on a total renovation of an 1850s historic home in Brooklyn. Balloon wood frame construction throughout the house. Looks like brick infill was thrown in between the wood joists as a fire stopper between the framing of the attached row houses. Up until demo the walls were covered with withe wood lathe and plaster. What should I do about the brick. I want to remove the lose mortar, close up the holes in the brick, and just get one monolithic layer of plaster or mortar over each between the studs so that the cavities and the studs are flush and To add mass and structure to the wall. Highly doubt I can get any wire lathe on these bricks as they are pretty lose and wobbly. I want to keep the studs exposed because I will eventually use a horizontal furring strip to hold the drywall behind which I will get some closed cell foam. I really would appreciate some guidance As to what materials and process to use to for these old brick stud bays. Structolite, mortar? Iíve attached some pictures for reference. Thanks in advance
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Brooklyn Historic Home Masonry Question #2-089b3d91-34d7-414a-991a-aae0305f66e4.jpeg   Brooklyn Historic Home Masonry Question #2-14bebd1c-8852-4148-82af-9cd175096278.jpeg   Brooklyn Historic Home Masonry Question #2-b829125d-5af3-4069-b3b0-b1d9a41aa83e.jpeg  

Last edited by Thegoodjudge; 05-12-2019 at 04:27 PM. Reason: Update
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Old 05-13-2019, 06:42 AM   #2
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Re: Brooklyn Historic Home Masonry Question #2


I did the same complete house renovation with the same situation.

Removed the brick only from the few bays where HVAC and electric needed to go.
Insulated the house from the exterior and used drywall on the interior.

Since it was plaster, you will need to pack out the wall in some areas to make it level, using furring strips, lath or plywood as applicable to make the wall straight and level.

That said, it's a bit pain in the ass to work with this, your electrician will figure out the best way to bring electricity into the bays without removing as many bricks as possible because every time you remove some you end up with a load of bricks.

This side of the home in the pictures I took out all the brick since 2nd story addition was going in, but and you can see the cross braces all over the place, they helped on the rest of the house since you can only remove portion of the brick and the rest of it was supported by this cross bracing.

Good luck
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Old 05-13-2019, 10:47 AM   #3
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Re: Brooklyn Historic Home Masonry Question #2


By the way,the term for the brick infill is nogging. Read various reasons for the use of it. Some say rodent control,some say fire protection.

Think Greg gave you a good battle plan.
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Old 05-13-2019, 08:39 PM   #4
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Re: Brooklyn Historic Home Masonry Question #2


Hey Brooklyn based Electrical contractor here if you need any Electrical work feel free to contact me.

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Old 05-15-2019, 12:11 AM   #5
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Re: Brooklyn Historic Home Masonry Question #2


The "nogging" now usually referring to masonry infill at the top of a veneer ABOVE the soffit around the rafters/truss tails.

The several tons of brick would of course act as thermal mass, moderating the interior's air temps year around....and of course slow down the occasional bullet....

Only direct hits by high F # tornadoes would blow over fully "nogged" wood homes.....
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Old 05-15-2019, 08:17 PM   #6
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Re: Brooklyn Historic Home Masonry Question #2


What is on the other side of the wall?
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Old 05-16-2019, 06:11 AM   #7
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Re: Brooklyn Historic Home Masonry Question #2


Quote:
Originally Posted by Fouthgeneration View Post
The "nogging" now usually referring to masonry infill at the top of a veneer ABOVE the soffit around the rafters/truss tails.

The several tons of brick would of course act as thermal mass, moderating the interior's air temps year around....and of course slow down the occasional bullet....

Only direct hits by high F # tornadoes would blow over fully "nogged" wood homes.....
Several tons you can say that again I took out maybe 20-25% of the bricks and it was a good dumpster load. You have to figure if you take an 8' wall cavity 16 O.C loaded with brick each bay has about 388LB of brick, for a 2 story house they sure had to build good footings and foundations those days to support all that weight.

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