Molder Which One? - Page 2 - Tools & Equipment - Contractor Talk

Molder Which One?

 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-18-2020, 07:25 AM   #21
Pro
 
rrk's Avatar
 
Trade: remodeling
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: new jersey
Posts: 6,667
Rewards Points: 5,398

Re: Molder Which One?


Quote:
Originally Posted by HAPConst. View Post
Can I ask a stupid question. Why make your own molding? Are you saving that much money vs off the shelf? I have never been on a job where making my own molding hit me as the thing to do.
Ever try to match some older moldings? There is no "off the shelf"

Some times when doing less than a few hundred feet is more cost effective to do it yourself than pay for new knives that you can't keep, pay for set up time and then actually cutting from a custom place.
rrk is online now  

Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. ContractorTalk.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

   

Advertisement

 

Old 04-18-2020, 07:46 AM   #22
Focusing on solutions.
 
pinwheel's Avatar
 
Trade: hardwood floor contractor & so much more
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 5,242
Rewards Points: 494

Re: Molder Which One?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bldbiz View Post
I've seen Weinig molders around. Used they are fairly expensive but I understand you get what you pay for. I don't run a lot of trim. Looking to maybe spend $2500.
Thanks Pinwheel.
Granted, you're not going to put a weinig in your shop on your budget. But for what you get & can do with one, they're not that expensive used. With a little shopping, you can put one in shop with a decent library of knives, for under $10k. I've got $8500 in mine, with a large library of knives.

I've got an 18" woodmaster that does a decent job, but it's a hobby machine compared to the weinig. To run crown on the woodmaster, it's a multi run process. And 1/3 the feed speed. At least 2 passes just to get the profile, then either a 3rd trip through with a different knife to cut the back angles or 2 trips through the tablesaw. With the 5 head weinig, it's one pass. It takes longer to set up & dial in the machine than it does to run 1000' of crown.

The other beauty of the weinig, I can run s4s material through it. Which is a huge time saver when I'm preparing stock for a set of cabinets. Takes me about an hour now, to cut rough stock, then finish size all face & door stock for a full set of cabinets. I can process different widths of stock, with just the twist of a handle. Current job, has 4", 3 1/2", 3" 2 1/4" & 1 3/4" stock. All of it final sized without ever turning off the machine, in about 15 minutes of run time.


Doesn't take long to pay for with that kind of labor savings.

Last edited by pinwheel; 04-18-2020 at 07:53 AM.
pinwheel is online now  
Old 04-18-2020, 08:16 AM   #23
Member
 
Bldbiz's Avatar
 
Trade: General contractor
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Michigan
Posts: 49
Rewards Points: 12

Re: Molder Which One?


Pinwheel I hear what your saying. Could have bought one 6 yrs ago cheap but passed on it. For the type of work we do I couldn't justify a high capacity molder in the shop to be used very little although once I had one I could probably find work to keep it busy. I'll be 53 this year and still out framing, siding, roofing etc. Custom kitchens/trim are a tough sell for the majority of customers in my area. Maybe in a few more yrs. transitioning to more cabinetry etc. will be a plan.

Kind of like telehandlers or cranes a bigger one would always be nicer.
Bldbiz is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Bldbiz For This Useful Post:
pinwheel (04-18-2020)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 04-18-2020, 02:05 PM   #24
Focusing on solutions.
 
pinwheel's Avatar
 
Trade: hardwood floor contractor & so much more
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 5,242
Rewards Points: 494

Re: Molder Which One?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bldbiz View Post
Pinwheel I hear what your saying. Could have bought one 6 yrs ago cheap but passed on it. For the type of work we do I couldn't justify a high capacity molder in the shop to be used very little although once I had one I could probably find work to keep it busy. I'll be 53 this year and still out framing, siding, roofing etc. Custom kitchens/trim are a tough sell for the majority of customers in my area. Maybe in a few more yrs. transitioning to more cabinetry etc. will be a plan.

Kind of like telehandlers or cranes a bigger one would always be nicer.
I'm 56 in a week & still humping out hardwood floors. The body is really starting to protest, which is why we're making the transition to cabinets & trim now.

Course, we been doing floors for 25 years & our clients aren't wanting to let us make the transition. They want us to do all of it, cabinets, trim & keep doing their floors.
pinwheel is online now  
Old 04-18-2020, 02:44 PM   #25
LRG WoodCrafting

 
Leo G's Avatar
 
Trade: Maker of Fine Sawdust
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Windsor Locks, Connecticut
Posts: 43,211
Rewards Points: 12,521

Re: Molder Which One?


Get some young bucks to do them for you.
__________________
Sawdust Follows Me Everywhere
I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.
Sanding is the bane of my existence
WWG1WGA

Quote:
Originally Posted by HusqyPro View Post
Carpenter by day.
Mad scientist by night.
http://lrgwood.com
Custom Cabinets in Hartford County Connecticut
Leo G is online now  
Old 04-18-2020, 02:54 PM   #26
Pro
 
tjbnwi's Avatar
 
Trade: Remodeling
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Cedar Tucky, Indiana
Posts: 11,430
Rewards Points: 4,734

Re: Molder Which One?


Quote:
Originally Posted by pinwheel View Post
I'm 56 in a week & still humping out hardwood floors. The body is really starting to protest, which is why we're making the transition to cabinets & trim now.

Course, we been doing floors for 25 years & our clients aren't wanting to let us make the transition. They want us to do all of it, cabinets, trim & keep doing their floors.
I wish some of our cabinets were as light as hardwood flooring....

Tom
tjbnwi is online now  
Old 04-18-2020, 03:03 PM   #27
Pro
 
rrk's Avatar
 
Trade: remodeling
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: new jersey
Posts: 6,667
Rewards Points: 5,398

Re: Molder Which One?


Quote:
Originally Posted by tjbnwi View Post
I wish some of our cabinets were as light as hardwood flooring....

Tom
I don't think the weight is the issue as much as being bent in half with 1 arm in near non stop movement all day long
rrk is online now  
The Following User Says Thank You to rrk For This Useful Post:
pinwheel (04-18-2020)
Old 04-18-2020, 04:32 PM   #28
Focusing on solutions.
 
pinwheel's Avatar
 
Trade: hardwood floor contractor & so much more
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 5,242
Rewards Points: 494

Re: Molder Which One?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo G View Post
Get some young bucks to do them for you.
I'm actively looking for a young buck to take on as an apprentice with the option of selling the floor business to after a year. Like everywhere, nobody wants to work that hard. Lucrative, or not.
pinwheel is online now  
Old 04-18-2020, 04:35 PM   #29
Focusing on solutions.
 
pinwheel's Avatar
 
Trade: hardwood floor contractor & so much more
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 5,242
Rewards Points: 494

Re: Molder Which One?


Quote:
Originally Posted by tjbnwi View Post
I wish some of our cabinets were as light as hardwood flooring....

Tom
It's not the weight that's the problem. Crawling around on the floor all day & up & down 100 times a day gets harder & harder every year.


The job we're currently on, is 2300' of sanded floor. That's approx 7500# of floor we packed in & up stairs, 70# at a time
pinwheel is online now  
Old 04-18-2020, 05:00 PM   #30
Pro
 
rrk's Avatar
 
Trade: remodeling
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: new jersey
Posts: 6,667
Rewards Points: 5,398

Re: Molder Which One?


Quote:
Originally Posted by pinwheel View Post
It's not the weight that's the problem. Crawling around on the floor all day & up & down 100 times a day gets harder & harder every year.


The job we're currently on, is 2300' of sanded floor. That's approx 7500# of floor we packed in & up stairs, 70# at a time
did you make the flooring or buy it ? here they used to get it delivered and the poor delivery schlubs had to place it in the room wherever the installer wanted like drywall

If you are looking for an apprentice look for a Brazillian, in NJ 95% or more are Brazilian and most live in the same area and drive all over the state. The ones I have used do great fast work.
rrk is online now  
Old 04-18-2020, 06:13 PM   #31
Focusing on solutions.
 
pinwheel's Avatar
 
Trade: hardwood floor contractor & so much more
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 5,242
Rewards Points: 494

Re: Molder Which One?


Quote:
Originally Posted by rrk View Post
did you make the flooring or buy it ? here they used to get it delivered and the poor delivery schlubs had to place it in the room wherever the installer wanted like drywall

If you are looking for an apprentice look for a Brazillian, in NJ 95% or more are Brazilian and most live in the same area and drive all over the state. The ones I have used do great fast work.

We buy it from a hardwood floor distributor. Comes to my shop via truck line. I'm the poor schlub that has to handle it all. I could mill it with the weinig, but I don't have an end matcher or a source cheap enough for raw materials to make it profitable to mill ourselves.

There's no brazillians around here, just caucasion rednecks. I've had some high school farm boys help me from time to time, those boys aren't scared to work, just haven't found one that wants to apprentice yet.

Advertisement

pinwheel is online now  
The Following User Says Thank You to pinwheel For This Useful Post:
rrk (04-18-2020)


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Join Now... It's Fast and FREE!

I am a professional contractor
I am a DIY Homeowner
Drywall Talk is for
PROFESSIONAL CONTRACTORS ONLY!

At DrywallTalk.com we cater exlusivly to professional contractors who make their living as a contractor. Knowing that many homeowners and DIYers are looking for a community to call home, we've created www.DIYChatroom.com DIY Chatroom is full of helpful advices and perfect for DIY homeowners.

Redirecing in 10 seconds
No Thanks
terms of service

Already Have an Account?