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Old 09-08-2011, 08:39 AM   #1
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Chainsaws


I read on here somewhere that old homelite xl saws are worth saving, I have one such saw that was my grandfathers. It has been collecting dust for 20 years and I was recently about to feed it to the dumpster. Can someone tell me what is so special about these saws ( other than no safety crap on them ) and if I should bother taking it in and have it gone through and serviced.
Thanks
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Old 09-08-2011, 08:54 AM   #2
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Re: Chainsaws


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Originally Posted by Ninjaframer View Post
I read on here somewhere that old homelite xl saws are worth saving, I have one such saw that was my grandfathers. It has been collecting dust for 20 years and I was recently about to feed it to the dumpster. Can someone tell me what is so special about these saws ( other than no safety crap on them ) and if I should bother taking it in and have it gone through and serviced.
Thanks
Its not that they are the best..just that was when homelite made good saws. They did run really hot, they are heavy and had no safety(chain brake). You would probably be better of selling it online to someone that has a running xl .. My dads saw just gave up the ghost last year after 30+ years of hard use...cracked the head.

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Old 09-08-2011, 09:30 AM   #3
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Re: Chainsaws


I think if I had a decent older small gas saw that was fixable, I would probably keep it.
Iíve actually been looking into getting a small 14" gas powered chainsaw for some tree work around my property, but Iím reading about how many of these small saws are hard starters and also hard to restart when hot. Hard staring isnít something I want to have to deal with while up a tree suspended from a flipline and gaffs. I donít understand this given all the advances in carburetion and electronic ignition over the years.
I considered an electric, but the idea of having a 12/3 extension cord running all the way the up a 60-foot tree from grade level sounds a little crazy to me, as well as heavy and awkward.
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Old 09-08-2011, 09:49 AM   #4
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Re: Chainsaws


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I think if I had a decent older small gas saw that was fixable, I would probably keep it.
Iíve actually been looking into getting a small 14" gas powered chainsaw for some tree work around my property, but Iím reading about how many of these small saws are hard starters and also hard to restart when hot. Hard staring isnít something I want to have to deal with while up a tree suspended from a flipline and gaffs. I donít understand this given all the advances in carburetion and electronic ignition over the years.
I considered an electric, but the idea of having a 12/3 extension cord running all the way the up a 60-foot tree from grade level sounds a little crazy to me, as well as heavy and awkward.
My brother has a side tree business for years. He climbs and has a stihl arborist saw that he uses. He likes it a lot. They are dangerous if you are not used to using them because if they kick back it happens very fast. Unlike a kick back with a regular saw you dont have as much control because of the top handle. Plus when you are in a tall tree like that you will be stretching with some of your cuts. Electric saws are really not the right tool for large take downs like what you described. It can be done but you want the saw to have the power to make cuts efficiently and as fast as possible to minimze fatigue...which is the lead-in to mistakes.
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Old 09-08-2011, 09:49 AM   #5
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Re: Chainsaws


Quote:
Originally Posted by DuMass View Post
I think if I had a decent older small gas saw that was fixable, I would probably keep it.
Iíve actually been looking into getting a small 14" gas powered chainsaw for some tree work around my property, but Iím reading about how many of these small saws are hard starters and also hard to restart when hot. Hard staring isnít something I want to have to deal with while up a tree suspended from a flipline and gaffs. I donít understand this given all the advances in carburetion and electronic ignition over the years.
I considered an electric, but the idea of having a 12/3 extension cord running all the way the up a 60-foot tree from grade level sounds a little crazy to me, as well as heavy and awkward.
Get a Dolmar.
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Old 09-08-2011, 09:52 AM   #6
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Re: Chainsaws


Hard restarting is usually a result of the fuel boiling, & creating a vapor lock (air in the fuel line). It has become even more of an issue with the addition of high alchohol percentages in fuel. Alchohol boils at a lower temp than staight gasoline. It usually only happens in really hot weather with chain saws. The best way to prevent it is to run a premium low % oil mix (for lower head temps) , & keep the engine clean for better cooling.
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Old 09-08-2011, 10:22 AM   #7
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Re: Chainsaws


I just bought this Stihl 250 yesterday to demo an old cabin that I'm adding onto. Works like a champ. I had a husky but my wonderfull employees burned It up with the wrong oil mix.
The little homelite xl I have at home would be good for detail work like cutting saddles, ect. If its a good saw I'll take it in to get fixed.
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Old 09-08-2011, 11:04 AM   #8
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Re: Chainsaws


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Get a Dolmar.
Thanks, I was just reading that the Makita DCS34 14" commercial chainsaws are rebranded Dolmarís made in Germany, which sounds very appealing. They seem priced right too.
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Old 09-08-2011, 12:58 PM   #9
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Re: Chainsaws


The tree guy I use runs stihl as well.
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Old 09-08-2011, 01:55 PM   #10
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Re: Chainsaws


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Thanks, I was just reading that the Makita DCS34 14" commercial chainsaws are rebranded Dolmarís made in Germany, which sounds very appealing. They seem priced right too.
I bought a Dolmar ps5100 18" last year and am very happy with both the performance and reliability.

I am going to upgrade to a 20" bar and 3/8 chain this fall.
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Old 09-08-2011, 04:06 PM   #11
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Re: Chainsaws


i have 3 homelite xl saws...2 used to run but are parts now

and the other one has a 20" bar on it and its about 50 cc thing screams

i just cut a large oak with it last saturday...it is not good on gas but you can stand on it and it will keep goin

i 2nd the dolmar/makita good saws

ive cut with a shindiawa 488 for the last few years beat the sh!t out of it leave it in the bed of my truck all year and while plowing ive tossed numerous rounds on it and it keeps goin 3 pulls
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Old 09-08-2011, 04:31 PM   #12
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Re: Chainsaws


My father has an ancient Homelite with a 26" bar, its nearly impossible to get a new chain for it and its so heavy you can't cut all day...not to mention you get a massive blister from the manual oiler.
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Old 09-08-2011, 05:18 PM   #13
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Re: Chainsaws


Many people think that adding more oil to the mix will make the saw run cooler but it doesn't. It will make it run hotter.
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Old 09-08-2011, 05:27 PM   #14
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Re: Chainsaws


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My father has an ancient Homelite with a 26" bar, its nearly impossible to get a new chain for it and its so heavy you can't cut all day...not to mention you get a massive blister from the manual oiler.
Oregon makes chains that will fit. or custom cut one.

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